Where There Is No Doctor: A Village Health Care Handbook

 
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Product Description

Hesperian's classic manual, Where There Is No Doctor, is perhaps the most widely-used health care manual in the world.

Useful for health workers, clinicians, and others involved in primary health care delivery and health promotion programs, with millions of copies in print in more than 75 languages, the manual provides practical, easily understood information on how to diagnose, treat, and prevent common diseases. Special attention is focused on mutrition, infection and disease prevention, and diagnostic techniques as primary ways to prevent and treat health problems.

This 2007 reprint includes new material on preventing the transmission of blood-borne diseases, how HIV/AIDS is reflected in many health issues, and basic Antiretroviral treatment information, as well as updated information on children and aspirin, stomach ulcers, hepatitis, and malaria treatments.

Customer Reviews:

  • Missionary student, have used this book.
    Excellent for use in third world countries. Every missionary should own a copy of this book. The only reason I do not give 5 stars to this book is because of the philosophies of David Werner on community development, which contradict biblical community development ideas. For instance, he promotes some non-conservative ideas about birth control. So Christians, just be careful whose hands this book gets into. I would give the same warning about the "where there is no women doctor" book. That one is definitely not worth buying, you're better off with a good basic handbook on childbirth and prenatal care. ...more info
  • Useful in Africa
    I read this book years ago while posted in Gabon with the Peace Corps. Since I was 5hrs (by car) from the nearest western doctor, this book was indispensible. It was also useful to show to African friends and those curious about the English language or western medicine.

    My only complaint is that the book could use better (more detailed) pictures....more info
  • Amazing!
    A great guide for field work in rural Africa!...more info
  • Fantastic
    As a first responder with years of Search and Rescue experience, I found this book to be of immense value and full of practical knowledge not normally available to the average layman. Even though some of the scenarios MAY never occur in America, I think it is very elitist to assume that they NEVER WILL occur in America. This book is an absolute must for all people who are serious about personal or community health care....more info
  • Indispensable outside Europe and North America
    When we visit my wife's village in Ghana, this is almost the first thing that we pack. Anyone travelling to the less developed parts of the world should take a copy - and leave it there with someone who can use it. This is probably the most widely used medical reference book in the world - it has been translated into 80 languages. Its simple language, clear explanations and illustrations make essential medical knowledge accessible to anyone with basic literacy. The diagnostic charts are very straightforward and make it easy for a lay person to distinguish between diseases which can be easily confused. The treatments described are completely appropriate for village conditions. There is considerable emphasis on preventative health care and on health education. Anyone familiar with village life in underdeveloped countries will acknowledge that this book is an extraordinary achievement. For those who complain that it is not relevant to the United States: the book was written for "those who live far from medical centers, in places where there is doctor". However there is plenty of information which *is relevant* to a North American audience, particularly the section on nutrition. Anyone backpacking or camping in the more remote regions of the US would benefit from taking this a long....more info
  • DONT LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT
    Everything and anything you need to know about healthcare. We live in the heart of africa where there are no doctors, and myserious illnesses & bacterias keep popping up. Since we have this book there is much less cause for worry. Dont leave home without it!...more info
  • A Real Life Saver!!!!!
    This book is written in very easy to read english. Which is part of its value. Not being in the medical field and if I had to deliver a baby in the bush in Africa I want the book to be written as simply as possible. The drawings are a bit better than stick men but they get the point across. My wife and I lived in West Africa and quite often in the bush. Places where you do not find a doctor and the hospitals are less than our American medicine cabinets. This book has helped through malaria; yellow fever; insect bites; dehydration; water purification; etc. These were areas that we truly faced and the book took us through. Yes, we survived!! If you know anyone in the 3rd. world, do them a great service and get them this book. No missionary or business men to the 3rd. world have any business leaving without this book....more info
  • WOW WHAT A GREAT BOOK!
    This book will keep you buisey for a long time trying to absorb all the good information in it.It was originaly written for villiges in remote places like africa so you know it will help us out in the forrest.Or werever we might be....more info
  • A village health care handbook for Africa, not an EMT manual.
    Judging this book by its intended purpose it looks very good. Many things are basic like cleanliness, diet, don't smoke ciggarettes, etc. But I thought some were not so basic (and I couldn't find them in my boy scout manual). For example:
    Page 67: the possible medicines needed for injection (Appendicitis - ampicillin or penicillin with streptomycin, syphilis - benzathine penicillin, gonorrhea - kanamycin, etc).
    Page 154: six different vaccinations and the reccomended ages.
    Page 169: a flowchart to care for a person with acute diarrhea (when would you give them metonidazole, or co-trimoxazole, or ampicillin?).
    Page 180: treatment for pneumonia.
    Page 208-210 chart: 38 different types of skin problems which include onthocerciasis, vitiligo, and kwashiorkor.
    ETC.
    Also the basic stuff is so well laid out that I could see it helping a worker organize their thoughts along the lines of "What do I need to check?" or "What do I need to teach those who don't know the basics?". If you were in a remote situation, people were sick wanting you to help them NOW, and THERE WAS NO DOCTOR this manual would be very reassuring to have. Stress can make you forget basics. Or maybe if you were in the States and couldn't afford health insurance and wanted to be sure you were in true need before you went to the doctor who will bill you for walking in the door?...more info
  • Can't be without it!
    I am studying for a laboratory specialist in the US Army now. While growing up, my mother many times cured me with this book ...this was our family doctor we have a very old copy and I am so happy to find this again... I have learned so much in this book and must say that this book is extremly valuable....more info
  • The best about this subject.
    I'm an (unemployed) agronomist, here in Brazil.I have this book and I read it.This book is the most usefull book about medicine, I ever read.This book isn't for the doctor, but for the patient itself.When I must go to work in a farm, here in Brazil, I pick this book sometimes.
    If you live 100% in a city, this book is usefull.If you live on a farm, this book is also an excellent choice. ...more info
  • OUR BIBLE FOR 2 YEARS
    WE SERVED IN THE PEACE CORPS IN RURAL PARAGUAY AND THIS BOOK ,IN SPANISH AND ENGLISH, WAS ONE OF THE TOOLS THAT THEY GAVE THE HEALTHCARE WORKERS TO TAKE TO THEIR ASSIGNED SITES. IT WAS INVALUABLE TO US AND WE COULD SHOW THEM THE SAME PASSAGE IN THE SPANISH EDITION AND THEY COULD FOLLOW ALONG. THANK YOU DAVID!...more info
  • A must for medical missionaries...
    Clear, concise, illustrated, and practical are but a few words that describe of this book. I especially appreciated the "attitude" of the book... not only one of healing the sick, but also one of teaching those in the village how to establish a medical community of their own. It's a great book to use and then leave for those with whom you've been working. "Where There Is No Dentist" would be a good companion, as well....more info
  • Where There Is No Doctor: A Village Health Care Handbook
    This book was designed for primitive health care. It isn't set up to turn the layman into a surgeon.
    For what it is; it does an excellent job. A huge block of it has little use here in the states, but there is at least one good tip on every page. Once you move past the political and socioeconomic points, it's a wonderful learning tool.

    One thing that is often over looked; Hesperian the publisher distributes this and countless other books for FREE. Their whole philosophy is medicine should be cheap or free and is a world wide entitlement not a privilege.
    HINT, HINT go to Hesperian.org and while your at it Google "Ships Captains Medical Guide." This is also a free down load and packed full of good info.
    ...more info
  • what I think
    fist thing fist I'm as backpacker and survival instructor. most of the books I read deal with fist aid and truma [ sorry bad speller] long term village hearth care is not my thing. if it's your thing plaese buy this book and use's it , it will help ,most of this book is on preventive medicine and pregnancy and prenatal care, that fall out of my frield of need . it not A bad book but not great for me ...more info
  • I won't leave home without it!
    We just returned from a trip to Honduras to work as part of the Hurricane Mitch Medical Relief efforts. This book (Spanish Edition) was a life saver for the medical team and the Hondurans we were treating. The text is comprehensive enough to assist in diagnosis and treatment for the team, and basic enough to share with the patients and provide education for them as well as cure what ails them. A must for anyone practicing medicine in developing countries! I'm purchasing my own copies to help with our practice in NM very near the Mexico border!...more info
  • Must have!
    I recently returned from a week in Guatemala. We had a very basic health clinic set up. This book was invaluable for may things- rehydration solution, drug doses, all in an easy to use format. Although I'm an NP, this basic guide was a blessing for village medicine....more info
  • An essental for third world travelers
    As a former PCV, this book literally had infomation that was life saving. We still use it 15 years later and have bought the newest edition.

    For those who have never left the states, it may not be comprehensible "what do you mean - this disease might be worms or malnutrition? I'm an american and I can't get those diseases." However, if you have traveled outside the states (or into rural areas here in the states, you will have seen something described in this book.

    WTIND contains descriptions of causal factors, local remedies (that may or may not work) and some regional supersitions about diseases that can affect treatment and survival. It is a real life depiction of the diseases and treatments that a traveler or worker will face in most of the world....more info

  • An excellent overall look at medical emergent care
    This book is an absolute must have for anyone who feels they might be put in the roll of medical provider. I do recommend this book highly and have given it to several friends, as a reference. It gives clear and consise directions for many things including childbirth, trauma, and even many diseases and parasites we feel will never happen here. The only drawbacks are the diseases that require medicines that are precription and can't be purchased by an individual to take into the wilderness or home, in this country. The book does also list several alternatives to these medicines if they are unavailable. I recommend this book to anyone to read from cover to cover (and then keep as a reference) if you feel that at any time you may be hours or even days from medical care....more info
  • Very useful book for anyone in a rural area.
    I found this book to be simply written and easy to understand. It is full of useful information for anyone treating sicknesses in a rural area of the world. The book is practical even if you have no background in medicine. Everyone that I have heard of that have used the book found it extremely helpful....more info
  • Good Medical Resource
    I was introduced to this book while in the Amazon basin...It was a very handy tool for treating minor problems and emergency first-aid since medical help was hours away. I highly recommend the book....more info
  • Not Helpful for the Average Person
    At the risk of going contrary to everyone else who has reviewed this book...Too frequently it suggests one get the injured person to the nearest hospital. Or suggests they get a physician in to help. Or suggests one acquire different prescription medicines. There is a plethora of suggestions along the lines that one should encourage primative mothers to give their children fruit instead of sodas, if they have any money for snacks. I bought this book based on the glowing reviews, but after looking it over, I returned it. Maybe wonderful for the Peace Corps but not for the average household wishing to avoid the medical profession as much as possible. If you are thinking along these lines, this book was not written for you. Most of it is common sense. If you cannot figure out that a person with severe bleeding should be kept immobile and not fed, then by all means get this book!...more info
  • 0 star for good advice, 5 stars for entertainment
    We have a copy of this book at our hospital purely for entertainment. With such sound advice as "don't tie a crab to a goiter" or " don't eat a vulture to cure syphilis", it is quite possibly the most entertaining book that I have ever read. The illustrations alone have us all rolling. I can understand the layman's interest as a resource, but there must be at least a million better resources- but none as amusing. I recommend it purely for entertainment. And remember-you don't get worms from eating sweets, you get them from eating SH*T!...more info
  • It can really help.
    This book has been very to easy to understand to a person/s that are interested in basic health and simple diagnostics. A real boon for the first time pregnancy. A real must for people not living close to a Doctor....more info
  • Pretty good book ...
    Overall this book is very good, and I learned quite a bit from it. My only complaint (and the reason I gave it 4 stars instead of 5) is that there are numerous places throughout the book which recommend that you "seek medical attention" for serious conditions ... but how exactly am I supposed to do that "where there is no doctor"?

    But regardless, I'd still recommend it as a good backcountry first-aid manual....more info
  • Very clear - and influential
    UPDATE: Last time I was home in 2006, my friend who's a nurse in a district hospital in the middle of nowhere (in Pahang state in the middle of west Malaysia; they see a lot of Orang Asal tribal patients with malnutrition) came to visit and I lent it to her. I think she really liked it because she didn't want to return it, but my parents wanted it back because it's an "heirloom" of sorts. So I got her her own copy of the latest edition.

    This was one of my favourite books as a child because I've always been interested in the biomedical sciences. Seriously, the text and diagrams are straightforward enough for a six-year-old to understand, an important thing in developing countries where literacy varies. One of the things it addresses well is the importance of both combating superstition among rural people and the need for the healthcare worker to do so without being arrogant. It's probably had a big influence on my decision to study infectious diseases....more info
  • Read this before you go!
    This may not be the be all end all, but read at home before the adventure begins , it will get one ready to ask the right questons, and be better preped for what remote intails! Lots of usable info, tech, and prevention!...more info
  • Very VERY basic
    Unless you have no experience with basic medical care you will likely find this book very elementary and you would be better off buying a boy scout's handbook, although it wouldn't cover some of the female items, it would give you more information on dealing with the day to day.

    The numerous references about 'seeing a doctor' defy the title and purpose implied by the book....more info
  • excellent
    Very useful and have already used it myself twice . And very accurate ....more info
  • ...
    Excellent book for people traveling to relatively undeveloped countries to help people there. Not the best book for do it yourself medicine unless you will be very far out in the wilderness and have almost no previous nowledge. This books deals with things like basic hygiene, and how to avoid cavities by not eating sugar and instead eating a balanced diet. It can be used by someone who is semi-literate in English....more info
  • Tanzanian girls found it excellent
    I gave a copy of the Swahili version to my Tanzanian nieces, who spent every evening reading it by candle-light. They ranged in age from 6 to 17 and said it was the best thing they had ever read. I had hired a young woman as cook during a three month stay in Tanzania and she was so taken with the book that she later wrote to ask me to help her with fees to train as a nurse, a profession in which she has now qualified. With government health services deteriorating in Tanzania, the girls were very thankful to have this book....more info
  • Very useful material
    David Werner has assembled a wonderful primer for anyone rendering care in the third world. There is useful information for everyone from lay people to MDs, well worth the time it takes to read the book. I especially like the succinct treatment plans with common and inexpensive medications. Treating patients in the third world without a laboratory, X-ray, or other modern tools takes a different mindset that WHERE THERE IS NO DOCTOR puts into perspective.

    Strongly recommended. I'm taking a copy back to the mountains of Panama with me next week. ...more info
  • Simply Superior - Period.
    I first saw this book in Africa. My team was treating pretty much everything that came down the pike. This book helped us more than anything else besides experience. I had three copies of this book from the Peace Corps. They've all gone "down the forsaken path of the loaned book". This and "Where There is no Dentist" are simply superior - Period....more info
  • Excellent for the missionary
    This is an invaluable book for travel to the less developed parts of our shared world. I have given several copies to villagers for their empowerment when little medical help was available. As a physician I found the book both readable and accurate and as a priest the concern for the poor was evident and despite my opposition to abortion on the whole I can still recommend it. Chuck Petit+...more info
  • Helping East Africa
    My family and I are missionaries living in E. Africa. I am a registered nurse in the U.S. so I do have medical training, yet here in Africa I have turned to (the older version of this book) many times. I have turned to this book for ringworms, scabies, malaria, medication, birth control options, infant malnutrition, etc. A lot of teaching to the local people, and plan to do much more. This book is easy to read, and a great reference. I did not give it a 5 start b/c for some reason (the older version of this book)not sure about the latest one, but it uses the word shi* for the word stools, or poop. And I can see how someone who does not have medical training could try some of the procedures in the book (ex. circumcision) and end up doing more harm than good. So that is my review. ...more info
  • Peace Corps Handbook
    As a Peace Corps Volunteer I found this book to be an incredible resource, as a new parent I am finding it to be valuble once again. Clear concise information without all of the holier than thou medical jargon. Good home remidies, good drawings and good emergency advice....more info
  • Kmart version of a good book.
    Groundwood paper pages make this a disposable version of the same book published in the U.S. on more durable paper....more info
  • Simply the best layman's medical guide, period.
    This book should be in every home. It was especially designed for people in rural areas without access to a doctor but the medical information is applicable anywhere. The way the information is presented - it is written to be easily understood by anyone and you don't need a medical degree to do so - is impressive. The wealth of information here on a large number of topics, from symptoms to treatment to possible drug side-effects, is also impressive. While most laymans' medical manuals deliberately withhold information and tell you to "see a doctor" for certain things, this book does not. As such it should be extremely valuable for emergencies. It is no substitute for a doctor but is indespensible for those situations where no doctor is available....more info
  • Not really applicable to most North American situations
    Get this from the library before you buy! Luckily, I did! It was disappointingly lacking in functional medical knowledge, given the title. Most of the book kept drifting into discussions of handling political/social/superstition issues associated with living in tribal/Third World villages. I found the implied assumption that these people groups do not possess even a modicum of common sense regarding basic hygiene to be elitist at best, and downright insulting at worst. Get a copy of the American Red Cross First Aid and Safety Handbook, and go forth armed with your own personal knowledge and sensitivity to others - you'll be miles ahead of this book. I really had high hopes for this reference before I read it - maybe a later edition will be more focused....more info
  • A must for anyone working in international development
    This book is amazing! I worked in Guatemala for around 8 months in community development, with a rural indigenous pueblo. We tried to get in as many doctors as possible, but when that failed, we could always use this book--the diagrams of each disease (especially the skin diseases, prevalent in Central America) helped us to decide how to address each person's health concerns. I only wish there was a copy in K'iche' for the community leaders to have to use!

    The forms included in the book for basic check ups and keeping medical records will be helpful in the future when we set up a clinic. I can't emphasize what a straight forward, useful, and practical book this is. If you intend to work anywhere in a developing country, with health or not, you need this book....more info

  • A book to keep and pass on.
    This book offers the very best reference for providing medical care in an environment where medical professionals are not available. It should be required reading for all medical students and certainly should be in the poses ion of anyone interested in emergency preparedness....more info
  • Great Book!
    I borrowed this book from a friend who had used it while in the jungles of South America. It helped me diagnose myself as having a kidney infection and push the doctors to treat me (they didn't believe me before hand.) I actually live in an urban area of California, but was unfortunately limited to using the Kaiser-Permanente medical system (which is basically like having no doctor.)...more info
  • Wannabe practitioner beware
    I will admit that while I lived in West Africa, I had a copy of Where There Is No Doctor on my shelf, and that I consulted it on a frequent basis. As a public health worker, it was an invaluable resource at the time. However, this was not the only book I had on hand, and I certainly didn't view it as the Medical Bible that so many cavalier explorers think it is. The simple fact is, unless you have adequate training to perform any sort of diagnosis or treatment, YOU SHOULD NOT DO SO, and you will probably do more harm than good. This book DOES NOT make you a medical professional to any degree whatsoever. It is also filled with horrible ideas that "might work" (that is a direct quote). Teaching people to rinse out condoms (as the French Language version suggests) or using bisected lemons as impromptu cervical caps is dangerous and totally irresponsible. There is no way in hell anyone who has simply leafed through this book is ready to deliver a baby. That is ridiculous. Sure, most of the time a mother will pretty much deliver her baby herself, but if something goes wrong, and you don't have the experience, you little tour into obstetrics is likely to kill the mother and/or the child.
    There is enough misinformation in the rural areas of the developing world already, and this book has the potential to take lives. Even in the most dire of situations, untrained yahoos should not be tempted into thinking that they can diagnose even the simplest of bacterial infections and prescribe the proper antibiotic.
    Another thing that this book does is take cultural health information that has evolved amongst native peoples, and it simplifies it so that other people can "try" it. There is a scarily simple illustration of a technique for circumcision in this book that has the potential to lead to the loss of a little boy's penis. In cultures where circumcision is practiced there is (almost) always a dedicated practitioner who performs such rites, and either has done hundreds (or thousands) of them, or has studied under the previous practitioner as an apprentice. i.e. this person is practiced, and has experience. This person is NEVER some wiseguy who got a copy of Where There is No Doctor from a friend, along with a rusty pair of scissors. Trying to circumcise a boy with the helpful sketch provided by this book would be ludicrous. God forbid some charlatan gets ahold of this book and comes to the great idea that he should be his village's "doctor." Many of the techniques in this book must be performed in an aseptic manner to reduce the chance of infection, but they are not done in such a manner in the book.
    That being said, the book can be a powerful tool for public health workers who do not have a strong background in clinical medicine. But it must be used cautiously, with supplemental information. There are innumerable fallacies in this book, and the author has taken little care to edit it. I'm sure the man means well, but really what he's done is reassure people who've watched too much ER that they can be doctors too.
    Honestly, the book should be re-edited, and many of the techniques should be removed, as they have the potential to cause more harm than good. If you want to help the developing world, support the local Ministry of Health, and empower them to either place trained nurses in the area, or to sponsor traditional healers and midwives to get the vital bits of training they need, training that can bridge the gaps in their significant knowledge base. Proper health networks are not built by medical tourists and short-stay medical missionaries who want to play doctor. They are constructed from the inside by countries who have people working to distribute resources and fight against corruption. If you want to help, pick up a few bags of cement and build a village health center that can be kept clean, but don't pick up a syringe and act like you know what you're doing. ...more info
  • Where there is no Doctor
    Best information for medical & non-medical people going on mission trips I have found. I have been on 15 trips to 4 different countries and I always take this book. It's always packed along side my Bible....more info
  • Nick P. owes me his life...
    While living in the wilds of San Diego, CA, I used this book to help send a friend to the emergency room. Diagnosis: Acute appendicitis. How did I know? I read this book! Being he had no health insurance he didnt want to go, but using the rebound method learned in this book, I convinced him to go and dragged him there in the back of my pickup. He is probably still mad at me about the bill he got, but that is another story......more info
  • A great read no matter how urban you are
    I first ran into this book when I was sharing a dorm room with two young women training to be health missionaries in South America. If you plan on going to any developing country in the near future, it is a must-read. I especially like the matter-of-fact treatment in the book of abortion and family planning. Abortion is not a good thing; but having women bear children they don't want and can't support is worse.

    While the authors don't mention it, this book also has more relevance than you might think to the problems of health care in the developed countries. We're so used to high tech medicine in the U.S. that we forget medicine is subject to a very steep curve of diminishing returns. Most of the benefits of modern medicine come from the first few dollars spent on people's health; precisely what is addressed in this book. For all the billions we spend on U.S. health care, sickness and death are still with us and always will be. Spending all that money doesn't necessarily translate into better or happier lives. We would be wise to keep this in mind when we are trying to rein in our out-of-control costs in Medicare and health insurance. This book also has something to teach the citizens of developed countries on the subject of faith healers, remedies for the common cold, dietary supplements with exaggerated claims of health benefits, and the like: don't waste your money.

    The book does have some weaknesses. For example, the authors emphasize that many rural village families have many children as a way of providing for their old age. I don't see how a large family can provide old age benefits to anyone if they are all starving together on a plot of land too small to support them.

    Overall, though, a great book. ...more info
  • Excellent Book
    I highly recomend this book. The author has done an exctraordinary job. This book is for both novice and advance people interested....more info
  • Indispensable outside Europe and North America
    When we visit my wife's village in Ghana, this is almost the first thing that we pack. Anyone travelling to the less developed parts of the world should take a copy - and leave it there with someone who can use it. This is probably the most widely used medical reference book in the world - it has been translated into 80 languages. Its simple language, clear explanations and illustrations make essential medical knowledge accessible to anyone with basic literacy. The diagnostic charts are very straightforward and make it easy for a lay person to distinguish between diseases which can be easily confused. The treatments described are completely appropriate for village conditions. There is considerable emphasis on preventative health care and on health education. Anyone familiar with village life in underdeveloped countries will acknowledge that this book is an extraordinary achievement. For those who complain that it is not relevant to the United States: the book was written for "those who live far from medical centers, in places where there is doctor". However there is plenty of information which *is relevant* to a North American audience, particularly the section on nutrition. Anyone backpacking or camping in the more remote regions of the US would benefit from taking this a long....more info
  • By far the best "Home Doctor" book around
    As a person living in tropical Asia, health is always a concern and health care is not often very good. Therefore I have continually used this book in diagnosing and treating disease which I may pick up along the way. The advice has always been accurate and the instructions easy to follow. Note that the emphasis of the book is on tropical medicine but is highly relevant to anyone living in a remote area where health care is distant....more info
  • Can't be without it!
    I am studying for a laboratory specialist in the US Army now. While growing up, my mother many times cured me with this book ...this was our family doctor we have a very old copy and I am so happy to find this again... I have learned so much in this book and must say that this book is extremly valuable....more info
  • When I traveled to India, this was an invaluable resource
    If you are traveling to a third world country, you must have this with you. Just buy it. You will be thankful that you have it. And, follow the instructions if you need help. But do not limit your review of this extraordinary book to international travel to third world countries, it can be used in your family and your community. You will have a solid understanding of health issues both personal and public after reading this book. ...more info
  • A Fantastic Book
    This and the companion volume, Where There is No Dentist, provide great practical grass-roots solutions to the problem of rising health care costs. As you might guess, Where There Is No Doctor and Where There is No Dentist, people practice proactive prevention instead of reactive treatment. Certainly it is good to live in a country where Doctors and Dentists abound, but they are expensive, and preventitive living is healthy living. Following the advice in these books won't just save you medical bills; it'll make you a healthier and better person all around. My highest recommendation......more info
  • Where There Is No Health Insurance
    I bought this book for traveling in Latin America but upon returning home have nicknamed my copy "Where There Is No Health Insurance". It's readable and specific (no medical euphemisms) and doesn't take the usual home health manual tack of "if you suffer anything more than a paper cut, you must go immediately to a Licensed Professional who will charge you $500 to recommend rest and fluids." My advice to the uninsured is to read this book CAREFULLY from cover to cover, then go to Mexico and stock up on basic antibiotics, etc that are available over the counter there. You will no longer have to choose between ignoring your health problems and incurring massive debt (and people claim this book is not relevant to the US!)...more info
  • A "Must Have" for Missionary Pilots
    For the last 18 years I have used this book, in English, Spanish, and in Portuguese. Those who are critical of the book in a USA context are probably right. However, they have never walked where I walked. Now, even in "civilized" USA, I don't want to be without a copy at home....more info
  • Stacie Pyfer Is An Idiot. Period.
    I don't know what else to say about her review. Obviously, she's never been in a situation where a book like this would come in handy. I don't think sneaking smokes and wine coolers behind the hospital dumpster count as being a place where There Is No Doctor. This is a great book. Please disregard Stacie Pyfer's (idiotic) review.*

    *As she is an idiot. Period....more info