Break Like the Wind

 
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Product Description

Has there ever been a rock band more unjustly maligned than Spinal Tap? Accused of everything from heralding the demise of heavy metal to being the very raison d'¨ºtre for alternative rock, they suffered their greatest indignity at the hands of director Rob Reiner (cowardly hiding behind the moniker Marty DiBergi), whose 1984 "rockumentary," This Is Spinal Tap, muckraked its way through the band's courageous, tragedy-strewn history in service of a few mocking laughs. Reiner/DiBergi even stooped so low as to employ a heartless, mercenary band of Hollywood writer/comedians to burlesque the band's core members--David St. Hubbins (played by mendacious Michael McKean), Nigel Tufnel (callow Christopher Guest), and Derek Smalls (haughty Harry Shearer). But the great ones just won't be denied; Spinal Tap reached deep down in 1992 and let loose with Break Like the Wind, another potent blast of the very stuff that made their legend. Featuring an all-star supporting cast (the title track alone boasts Slash, Steve Lukather, Joe Satriani, and Tufnel look-alike Jeff Beck), the Tap gallantly tried to stem the tide of flannel and tattoos with thundering odes to gender enlightenment ("Bitch School"), mystic quests ("Clam Caravan"), and its own glorious rock-fest legacy ("Stinkin' Up the Great Outdoors"). Pop diva Cher and St. Hubbins share a vocal tryst on the uplifting ballad "Just Begin Again," while even Steely Dan's reclusive Walter Becker pens technical notes, praising the album's pioneering use of the Crosley Phase Linear Ionic Induction Voice Processor System. Sadly, they just don't make albums like this anymore. --J.D. Swift

Enhanced UK pressing of Spinal Tap's 1992 rockin' return to the charts features two bonus tracks: 'All The Way Home' and the Enhanced Video for 'Bitch School'. Crank this one up to 11! MCA.

Customer Reviews:

  • Better than most "real" heavy metal
    It's hard to believe that these guys are not professional musicians and that they don't make a living from music. For a "parody" or "spoof" album, this is great music in it's own right. I listen to it first because it's funny, but I listen to it again because it's great stuff. The haunting title track is awesome, and tracks like "Rainy Day Sun" sounds like it was written by the Beatles. Like the first album the rhyming lyrics are purposefully contrived and are a chuckle at first listen, especially in "The Majesty of Rock" ("together and ever"). And the band's breadth of styles highlights the versatility of this extremely talented group of "musicians." ...more info
  • not as funny as the original
    Look, like everyone else posting here, I saw the movie a billion times, and went right out and picked up this new album just before seeing them live in San Francisco. I even dressed up in fake rocker attire with "Viv Savage Lives!" penned across my thigh. The problem - nobody else seemed to understand it was satire. People took it so seriously. I figured people would be dressed up, but no...just two of us. This album seems to suffer from the same malady. Yes, the lyrics are funny, but it seems a little forced, and its just not as fun as the first farce. It's in the face of farce. Farce-faced, even. Ok, I'm just being silly now. But what made the first album - and the movie - so much fun was the variety and spontenaity that's just missing from this collection of songs....more info
  • Back from the dead
    This 1992 album was Spinal Tap's first album in 8 years. It featured new songs, as well as rerecordings of older songs from their out of print albums. Here is a track by track analysis:

    1. "Bitch School" is a song about a disobedient dog. This one really rocks.
    2. "The Majesty of Rock" is about the life affirming power of rock and roll. Yeah, baby!
    3. "Diva Fever" is about how "high maintenance" women can make a man miserable. Ain't it the truth!
    4. "Just Begin Again" is a duet by David St. Hubbins & Cher. It is a really inspirational ballad.
    5. "Cash on Delivery" features a rare lead vocal by Derek Smalls. It uses money as a clever metaphor for sex.
    6. "The Sun Never Sweats" is a rerecording of the title song from a classic Spinal Tap album. There is a good reason that they chose to rerecord this one!
    7. "Rainy Day Sun" was originally the b-side of their hit "Flower People". It is a fun bit of hippie nonsense.
    8. Nigel Tufnel is one of the most influential guitarists in rock. On "Break Like the Wind", some of his disciples (Slash, Steve Lukather, Joe Satriani and Jeff Beck) provide guest solos in tribute to him.
    9. "Stinking Up the Great Outdoors" is an autobiographical song about the band's appearance at the US Festival.
    10. In "Springtime", Nigel sings about his favorite season. I won't spoil it by telling which one.
    11. In "Clam Caravan", Nigel sings about traveling through the desert. The Saharah, I think.
    12. "Christmas With the Devil" is a remake of their classic Xmas song. Ho ho ho!
    13. "The 13th Song" is about a dying man. It's very different for Tap, and very strange.
    14. "All The Way Home" was the first song David and Nigel every wrote together. This one is a real treat for longtime Tap fans.

    In short (too late), this CD is a must get for all Tapheads....more info

  • A cataclysmic of the Mind
    The greatest band of all time products the greatest album of all time!
    Break like the wind is a transgenic odyssey of musical integrity.

    A music have for any true fan of music...more info
  • Tap surpass that which they mock
    Astonishingly, perhaps, Break Like The Wind was one of the best heavy rock albums of its year (92), despite being a "spoof". I think the reason is fairly obvious; they actually seem to enjoy being a heavy metal band, and put as much work into this as any real band would. These are well written songs; and where the parody "bad" element comes in, e.g the tuneless Clam Caravan sitar solo, they're deliberately, masterfully bad. It's a fine demonstration that comedy parody only works when the parodists have a regard for that which they parody, and do it seriously.

    As I said, this is good music. It's not a comedy album you'll listen to once for a laugh, it's a fine rock album you'll listen to again and again, with excellent songs you'll find stuck in your head. Highlights for me: The Majesty Of Rock is a glorious rock anthem, and the title track is simply awesome, while Bitch School is a wonderfully mindless headbanger you won't be ashamed to listen to (because you can pretend you're just being ironic).

    Don't get me wrong; you'll laugh too, but with, not at, Spinal Tap. The humourous lyrics are beautifully, intelligently crafted; 3 intelligent guys playing idiots trying to be deep "..we are the thumbs on a stranger's hands" croons St Hubbins on BLTW, while on Majesty wondering "When we die do we haunt the sky, do we lurk in the murk of the seas? What then, are we born again, just to sit asking questions like these?". And The Sun Never Sweats (another fabulously strong track) muses, "We may be Gods, or just big marionettes"... and so on... and so on...

    Simply brilliant, and an essential part of every rock fan's collection.

    One more thing; the production is superb too. A must buy....more info

  • And that's the Majesty of Rock!
    Spinal Tap returns! The most prolific nonexistant band ever is back with "Break Like The Wind," a wonderfully warped metal album that celebrates rock'n'roll, bad lyrics and exploding drummers. This a bad album -- gloriously, magnificently bad, in the way only a spoof can be.

    It opens with the roaring male dominance rocker "Bitch School," which would be offensive if it weren't tongue-in-cheek, then lurches on to the wonderfully bloated "Majesty of Rock," a gloriously ghastly duet with Cher, the insanely pretentious "The Sun Never Sweats" ("Bolder than the pirates who used to rule the sea/Braver than the natives, who never heard of tea...")

    The peak of this album may be the song "Break Like the Wind," which aspires to be deep and inspirational despite lyrics like "We are the thumb on a stranger's hand." And two of the most priceless songs are at the end: the mope ballad "All the Way Home," and the truly twisted Christmas song, "Christmas With the Devil."

    The world was first introduced to Spinal Tap in "This is Spinal Tap," the classic rockumentary about England's loudest band. With the help of Cher (yes, that Cher) and Dweezil Zappa, they take it upon themselves to roundly mock metal, hard rock, rock ballads, and quite a few other things as well -- they're funny because they put so much effort into doing a nudge-wink bad job.

    The music itself is pretty standard hard rock riffs -- it's merely okay, and therein lies the irony. What's really startling is that while the music is not amazing in the technical sense, it's actually much better than many real-life bands were. Scary, no? It does have its moments of brilliance, due to Zappa and Jeff Beck mostly, as well as some gloriously ghastly sitar.

    It's not the music but the lyrics that are genius. Michael McKean, Christopher Guest, and Harry Shearer are true geniuses of the bad song -- what's even better, these are the sort of bad songs that people write, but don't know that they are bad. "And that's the Majesty of Rock!/The Mystery of Roll!/The darning of the sock,/the scoring of the goal!" Does it get worse than that? Yes, if you include lines like "Rise! for you are cream" and "We may be gods or big marionettes/But the sun never sweats."

    "Break Like the Wind" is a wonderful album by the loudest band in Britain, and the best band that never technically existed. Tap into this! ...more info
  • Almost better than the first!
    I have to say reading reviews that if people aren't laughing out loud at the music on this album you're missing the point. I agree that the lyrics are what give Spinal Tap their edge but if you're a musician listen to their dead on take of all forms of rock. The Sun Never Sweats is a highlight for me particularly the middle section that switches into three unrelated keys while the riff badly apes Slade or Jethro Tull. Rainy Day Sun does a great job of evoking bad '60's psychedlic rock - a cross between the Doors and the Kinks. The best part of the album though is Nigel's voicebox solo on Springtime. The only bad parts for me were the duet with Cher (too blatantly bad for me) and the remake of Christmas with the Devil which is done better on the remastered soundtrack (Take number one with their Hoiday greeting kicks every other version)....more info
  • It takes real talent to sound THIS bad!
    To master an art, you have to learn every possible way to get it wrong. By that definition, Tap are the masters, and they prove it with this disk. Spinal Tap finds more ways to suddenly and unexpectedly veer away from excellence and toward sardonic awfulness than any other individual or group I have ever heard. It takes real talent to sound this bad.

    The reason for the four stars is that, after a certain point, bad is just bad. My CD gets one listen a year. I doubt if I could stand more....more info

  • Maybe could have been 5 stars if this came first.
    This CD is the companion piece to the video "The Return of Spinal Tap", which comes up short as a follow-up to the classic original movie. So it follows that the soundtrack is not as good either. But how could it possibly be as good? The original was a masterpiece. The main problem with "The Return of Spinal Tap" and "Break Like The Wind" is that they sort of ruin the joke of the original. These guys were bungling idiots, both off and ON the stage. Now the actors seem to be taking themselves too seriously as musicians. There should be no way that big-name guest stars like Jeff Beck, Slash, and Cher would ever appear with the likes of Spinal Tap. Fortunately, the lyrics are almost as delightfully awful as they were in the original. "The Majesty of Rock", "The Sun Never Sweats" and "Just Begin Again" are particularly funny, and there are some good musical gags like the talk-box guitar on "Springtime". Finally, no holiday celebration can be complete without faux evil of "Christmas With The Devil"....more info
  • **
    For those that remember an immortal phrase from the original film, I thus dub this new soundtrack:

    S_ _ _ sandwich....more info

  • Break like the WIND!
    Spinal Tap returns! The most prolific nonexistant band ever is back with "Break Like The Wind," a wonderfully warped metal album that celebrates rock'n'roll, bad lyrics and exploding drummers. This a bad album -- gloriously, magnificently bad, in the way only a spoof can be.

    It opens with the roaring male dominance rocker "Bitch School," which would be offensive if it weren't tongue-in-cheek, then lurches on to the wonderfully bloated "Majesty of Rock," a gloriously ghastly duet with Cher, the insanely pretentious "The Sun Never Sweats" ("Bolder than the pirates who used to rule the sea/Braver than the natives, who never heard of tea...")

    The peak of this album may be the song "Break Like the Wind," which aspires to be deep and inspirational despite lyrics like "We are the thumb on a stranger's hand." And two of the most priceless songs are at the end: the mope ballad "All the Way Home," and the truly twisted Christmas song, "Christmas With the Devil."

    The world was first introduced to Spinal Tap in "This is Spinal Tap," the classic rockumentary about England's loudest band. With the help of Cher (yes, that Cher) and Dweezil Zappa, they take it upon themselves to roundly mock metal, hard rock, rock ballads, and quite a few other things as well -- they're funny because they put so much effort into doing a nudge-wink bad job.

    The music itself is pretty standard hard rock riffs -- it's merely okay, and therein lies the irony. What's really startling is that while the music is not amazing in the technical sense, it's actually much better than many real-life bands were. Scary, no? It does have its moments of brilliance, due to Zappa and Jeff Beck mostly, as well as some gloriously ghastly sitar.

    It's not the music but the lyrics that are genius. Michael McKean, Christopher Guest, and Harry Shearer are true geniuses of the bad song -- what's even better, these are the sort of bad songs that people write, but don't know that they are bad. "And that's the Majesty of Rock!/The Mystery of Roll!/The darning of the sock,/the scoring of the goal!" Does it get worse than that? Yes, if you include lines like "Rise! for you are cream" and "We may be gods or big marionettes/But the sun never sweats."

    This particular edition includes some extra goodies -- the rambly little song "All The Way Home," which was a pre-band song that the guys sort-of-sing in the movie. And then there's the "Bitch School" video -- an all-girls school, where a leather-clad Monroe-lookalike turns up to be the new teacher, and teaches the girls to get in touch with their inner S&M madam.

    "Break Like the Wind" is a wonderful album by the loudest band in Britain, and the best band that never technically existed. Tap into this! ...more info
  • Comic Metal
    Spinal Tap makes a triumphant return with "Break Like the Wind." Again, David St. Hubbins (Michael McKean), Nigel Tufnel (Christopher Guest), and Derek Smalls (Harry Shearer) pick up their instruments and bring us a tongue-in-cheek look at hard rock. Anybody who knows who this band is has seen the movie, "This Is Spinal Tap," a hilarious look at the ups and downs of touring. Although there are no in-depth interviews of the band members, this album is actually pretty good, and these guys can rock pretty well.

    The music is good, but definitely not wowing. It's not the music that makes this album, or the band, worthwhile. We are here for the lyrics. Nothing is sacred, and the Tap attacks within the opening bars of the album with the opening track, begging the question whether this is double-entendre or if it really is about sending a dog to obedience school. The Beatles even fall under their spoofing with "Rainy Day Sun." They get some help from guitar greats Jeff Beck, Satch, Slash and Steve Lukather for the title track, Dweezil Zappa on "Diva Fever," and Cher lends her voice for "Just Begin Again."

    This album is quite the production, and all the songs are keepers, some of the lyrics are absolutely great. A fun time had by all, the listeners, the band and the guests....more info
  • Wisen Up
    Yeah for all you people saying how This is Spinal Tap "disgraced" the band, there was no real band Spinal Tap. This is Spinal Tap invented the band. The movie made up the band to make fun of other bands.

    Some people are really stupid.

    But its a good CD (4 1/2 stars)...more info

  • As good, if not better than This Is Spinal Tap
    With more of a 90s sound, Break Like The Wind is a classic. With songs like Break Like The Wind, Christmas With The Devil, and B School (You have to see the video for it) this album will satisfy any Tap fan. David, Nigel, and Derek (Mike McKean, Christopher Guest, and Harry Shearer) show they can write songs with the best of them. I highly recommend the album, and the insidre cover is also good....more info

 

 
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