Little Women

 
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Product Description

Christmas won't be Christmas without any presents, grumbled Jo, lying on the rug.

Customer Reviews:

  • Be free Jo.
    This book was intended for teenage girls and, as such, has an incredibly blunt moral tone which really offended this reader. Be careful about taking this too seriously -- if you do then you might miss what makes it so remarkable as literature.

    Most female authors from this that time period that matter in the English literature canon were English, meaning that their worlds were one of extreme class constraint and that females, even if they were intelligent, had to shackle themselves to male counterparts who ended up jailing them to the society around them regardless of intent. Jane, Villette, and even the remarkable Shirley could not escape. None of the intelligent women in Austen could. George Eliot and Virginia Woolf tried to, but they still existed at the edge of British society at the time and still relied on it in many ways for their support.

    Here, though, the females are free to choose their paths. Jo is probably the most free in her marraige and in her choices (she is able to write a great deal about her life just as Alcott did). Amy willingly takes on a more traditional English path but with American freedoms thrown in such that she is not like an Austen herione. Meg is probably the most boring and does what anybody would probably do given her situation.

    Also, there is a great deal of exploration abour role playing and creativity. The girls act in local plays, Amy has artistic interests that allow her to express creativity, Beth is a first class sewer of intricate objects and almost fairy-like to her family and friends, and even their respective spouses are reasonable male characters.

    The simple romanticism and freeing of women from the shackles of a broken society make this more than required reading if you feel trapped. It has certainly enriched my life. Alcott was intelligent enough - in her books and in her personal life - to be able to live a life devoted to what was really important to her. I need to get to know as many people like this as possible if I am do likewise.

    I suppose I should add -- this is literature very much in the Dickens model of things. Very character oriented and lots of unncessary prose that explains things omnisciently. If you don't like this sort of thing - as I usually don't - then you might find it tough going.

    ...more info
  • Razz Berry
    Wouldn't it be fun to live in the early 1900's? Jo, Meg, Amy, and Beth show us all of the mountains a girl could encounter.
    Meg, the oldest is strong and beautiful. Beth, slowly washing away like a wave upon the sand. Amy, the youngest and fiercest, would marry for wealth. Jo, fits in her own category. These historical "little women" are an inspiration.
    In my eyes the girls should be read by all. The second I began reading this miraculous piece of work my fingers began to cramp for they were turning the pages of my book much quicker than I had predicted. The friendships and relationships this book has to offer are so much fun to read about, especially anybody who has been a 12 year old girl.
    Louisa May Alcott uses a wonderful narrative voice to tell the story. She also has very good character development in the beginning she shows you Meg, Amy, Beth, and Jo; you can practically feel the wind rushing through your hair as you gallantly stride in and out of the pages.
    The work of this incredible author, Louisa May Alcott, is truly inspiring, those of you who want to read a flawless book sprint to your local library or bookstore and pick up a copy of Little Women.
    ...more info
  • Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
    Wouldn't it be fun to live in the early 1900's? Jo, Meg, Amy, and Beth show us all of the mountains a girl could encounter.
    Meg, the oldest is strong and beautiful. Beth, slowly washing away like a wave upon the sand. Amy, the youngest and fiercest, would marry for wealth. Jo, fits in her own category. These historical "little women" are an inspiration.
    In my eyes the girls should be read by all. The second I began reading this miraculous piece of work my fingers began to cramp for they were turning the pages of my book much quicker than I had predicted. The friendships and relationships this book has to offer are so much fun to read about, especially anybody who has been a 12 year old girl.
    Louisa May Alcott uses a wonderful narrative voice to tell the story. She also has very good character development in the beginning she shows you Meg, Amy, Beth, and Jo; you can practically feel the wind rushing through your hair as you gallantly stride in and out of the pages.
    The work of this incredible author, Louisa May Alcott, is truly inspiring, those of you who want to read a flawless book sprint to your local library or bookstore and pick up a copy of Little Women.
    ...more info
  • Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
    Little Women Signet classic, 449 pp., $3.95
    Louisa May Alcott ISBN 978-0-451-52930-5

    Wouldn't it be fun to live in the early 1900's? Jo, Meg, Amy, and Beth show us all of the mountains a girl could encounter.
    Meg, the oldest is strong and beautiful. Beth, slowly washing away like a wave upon the sand. Amy, the youngest and fiercest, would marry for wealth. Jo, fits in her own category. These historical "little women" are an inspiration.
    In my eyes the girls should be read by all. The second I began reading this miraculous piece of work my fingers began to cramp for they were turning the pages of my book much quicker than I had predicted. The friendships and relationships this book has to offer are so much fun to read about, especially anybody who has been a 12 year old girl.
    Louisa May Alcott uses a wonderful narrative voice to tell the story. She also has very good character development in the beginning she shows you Meg, Amy, Beth, and Jo; you can practically feel the wind rushing through your hair as you gallantly stride in and out of the pages.
    The work of this incredible author, Louisa May Alcott, is truly inspiring, those of you who want to read a flawless book sprint to your local library or bookstore and pick up a copy of Little Women.
    ...more info
  • Great history lesson, bad moral tirade.
    I am absolutely torn as to how to rate this book.

    On one part, I feel awful about giving it a BAD rating, because it is a classic novel with an impeccably clean story.

    On the other hand, I can't bring myself to give it a GOOD rating, because the whole thing read like a Puritanical rant.

    Therefore, I think I will go with a 2.5 out of 5 star rating.

    I feel that Ms. Alcott said it best in the following quote: "'You said, mother, that criticism would help me; but how can it, when it's so contradictory that I don't know whether I've written a promising book or broken all the Ten Commandments?...This man says, "An exquisite book, full of truth, beauty, and earnestness; all is sweet, pure, and healthy"...The next, "The theory of the book is bad, full of morbid fantasies, spiritualistic ideas, and unnatural characters."'"

    As this quote was found in Part 2 of the book, which was written some years after Part 1 was published, I can only assume that the quote itself reflects real criticism that Ms. Alcott received for Part 1 of Little Women and reiterate that "I couldn't have said it better myself."

    Of course, all of this is coming from one who is long past childhood and young adulthood and therefore somewhat jaded in both spiritual and relationship matters, and as this book is basically the epitome of happy endings and moral tirades, I just could not bring myself to enjoy it as much as I may have 10-15 years ago....more info
  • Little Women
    I read Little Women recently and I would probably reccommend it to anyone that is okay with a sad, romantic book. The main character is Jo, a tomboy growing up in the late 19th century. It is Jo's story as she becomes an adult, and I think it is a great coming-of-age book for both boys and girls. (Girls would probably enjoy it a little more than boys.) Either way, it's a great book and you should read it as soon as you get your hands on it....more info
  • great mother daughter story
    This book is a wonderful book that tells the story of 4 girls who are living during the Civil war and trying to cope with their father away at war and their mother who is busy trying to make ends meet until their father returns. This book is great and touching. You see how unselfish these girls are and how they will do anything to help their mother. But this book also shows conflicts that arise between sisters. I recommend mothers and daughters and sisters to all read this book. ITs a great memory to share togehter. ...more info
  • THIS BECAME A CLASSIC?
    Little Women has a very weak plot, going back and fourth between what the character is thinking and what is actually happening.

    This book also completely lacked amusement! It talked and talked and talked, about NOTHING!!!! It absolutly moved to slow and when the book finally started getting faster, so much had changed in the story!
    There are much better classics out there! DO NOT WAIST YOUR TIME ON THIS BOOK!!!...more info
  • Just not my thing
    I read this book a long time ago and absolutely hated it. Then someone recommended Louisa May Alcott to me so I gave it another shot, but by the end I was truly wondering why Little Women had become such a classic. I found that the first half was lacking in plot - when I looked back on it I realized that I had spent at least a couple hours reading about a ball, a sickness, and a bad dinner - and that the second half had far too much plot. The first part was very hung up on morality and sometimes felt too pious, although Marmee was a remarkably enlightened woman. The characters, especially Meg, didn't feel distinct and realistic throughout the second half; I felt like the three years that had passed distanced me from the characters. Attempting to jam three romances, a death, and a storyline involving Jo's writing into the second part only made things feel more detached. As for the aforesaid romances, I tried desperately to find the emotional reasoning behind Jo's choice and came up empty handed. The one thing that saved this book was the simple language and writing; I found it easy to read.
    In short, I'm sure that this book appeals to some, but I didn't like at 7 and I don't like it now. I definitely agree with the people that recommended Anne of Green Gables instead - it and its sequels are great books....more info
  • A Treat For All!
    As the father of a teenage daughter who was about to see the screen play based on this book, I am probably an atypical reader of "Little Women", but I enjoyed it none the less. "Little Women" tells the charming story of the March family as the girls grow over several years. Presenting an idealized view of life beginning in Civil War era New England, it gives a glimpse into the world of their class and time. Occasionally it is refreshing to read a book which is just plain enjoyable, without devious characters and subliminal agendas. This book is a delight, even for those who are not, and never were, Little Women....more info
  • Absolutely a MUST read!
    You know the story. If you don't, many of these other reviewers have done the job for me. For me, this is my most favorite book in all of American literature. Growing up, I had a friend who was just like Beth and everytime I re-read this book, I remember my childhood adventures with Beth. The fictional Beth in "Little Women" was as much of a friend as my other friend, too.

    I cannot recommend this book enough. If you haven't read it -- you must read it....more info
  • LONG AND BORING
    Little Women is too long and very boring. There is just so much extra details in this book!!!! Half of wich, do not even make any sense!!! The girls in the book worry about everything and constantly cry, Marmee is and unrealistic mother, and EVERYTHING IS DESCRIBED! If you have patience for tiny print and dry story, you may find this book somewhat interesting.
    Also, I would like to ask, what is a teen girl (Amy) doing getting married to a man AT LEAST 40 YEARS OLD??!!...more info
  • Little Women
    I usually only read Action/Adventure, so when my friend request that I read this book I just stared at her with a blank expression.

    I started reading and I could not get through the sentences fast enough. I laughed and I cried.

    This truly is a great read!...more info
  • Timeless Classic
    The story of the March girls is a timeless classic that will never get old or out-dated. It is a book that can make you cry and sing. It is the story of life and the trials faced within it. It is a book everyone should read - and not because they have to, but because they want to....more info
  • Not Eye Catching Work!
    Maybe to the older person "Little Women" is an interesting book, but let's face it, the new genereation is just not interested in this kind of book. When I was in grade school, I had to read it for a project, and I hated it. The reason was probably beause it was not flashy or out of the ordinary. It just told the average story about the average family at that time. it may be interestign for some, but the young readers of today just don't like it all that much. ...more info
  • Good, except for the -- ah -- romance
    Don't get me wrong. While I'm the type that shrieks and covers my eyes when watching something like "Spiderman II" at a kissing part (or at a violent part, for that matter...) I don't mind books about marriage. And so the first part, Little Women book I, was a perfect portrait of a family. A good book, despite the heavy prejudice I carried against it, as it was (gasp) A Required Reading Book.

    The Part II, Good Wives, was -- er....interesting. Let's go through it, marriage by marriage.

    Meg's marriage. Cute. Same age, good match, and even I, who have decided that my marriage to ANYONE (or dating, for that matter) would be a sign of the Apocolypse, could understand why some less fortunate souls devote their life to another, staying with that person forever (well, not in the twenty-first century they don't - unfortunately). Meg and John Brooke was good. Nice. Sweet. You get it. Now let's move on.

    Laurie (Theodore's his real name, for all you thinking that to name a male child Laurie is about the greatest measure of torture you can inflict upon a boy) and Amy. Still okay, though -- and I speak for my entire class here -- LAURIE AND JO SHOULD HAVE GOTTEN MARRIED!!!!

    Jo and Mr. Bhaer. Gag. Vomit. WHAT IN THE WORLD WAS THIS AUTHOR THINKING??!! Assuming Mr. Bhaer is NOT in his late forties, assuming he is simply forty. Jo is around -- what, nineteem? Twenty? HE -- IS -- OLD -- ENOUGH -- TO -- BE -- HER -- DAD. She hits the ripe ol' halfway mark (in a manner of speaking) at fifty, and where is he? Seventy. Ol' granddad over there.

    Yep. Loved the book, hated the last romance. That's all I have to say.


    Rating: Very Good
    ...more info
  • The Lovliest Novel
    I read this book when I was 12 years old. I had to read it for school-it was a desperate last choice for the required reading. Boy, didn't I see this coming! It took a while, I will offer that (I eventually had only read half by the test.) But it changed my life. I model myself after Marmee, the loving and kind mother. This book taught me to have self respect and hold myself with dignity. I taught me to be polite and respectable. Throughout the turmoil of adolescene, with kids growing up to model pop culture icons and growing up too fast, with sex and drugs littering the road to adulthood, I held myself like a lady. Thank you, library, for having little selection. This book changed my life. Everyone has to read it. After that book, I read more classics, and let me tell you they are lovely. I mean this with all my heart, when I say that Little Women is the purest, realest, lovliest novel I have ever known. Thank you, Louisa. I now long for a better time. ...more info
  • Little Women Told By: Louisa May Alcott
    Rosemary R.
    ISBN:1-4027-1236-7

    I would recommend this book to anyone because of it's amazing qualities and meanings. The characters just all around have great qualities and are so loveable. It's a nice life story to read about. The genre is like a biography but not quite. It's a great old fashion book to read and shows the true meaning of family. It's a sure attention grabber! The Little Women have gone along way in their lives and will continue to live their lives to the fullest ability no matter if riches come or do not come their way....more info
  • A story that you will not forget.
    This is a book that once you read it you will never forget it. It is a timeless tale of 4 sisters and their struggle through life. When I read this book I started thinking about the charecters and thinkng would Jo do this or I wish I was more like Beth. Every girl needs to read this book even if you hate to read you neee to read this book. You wont be sorry....more info
  • A Wonderful, Awesome Book!!

    A timeless tale that has a special place in all of our hearts, Little Women. The magical story of four girls having adventures while they lay in wait for their father to come home from the Civil War. In this tale, Meg, the eldest, marries Mr. John Brooke, Teddy's tutor, and has the life she always wanted, like her mother. Meg moved down he road from her family, and had twins, Demijohn and Daisy, becoming the model mother she always wanted to be. After Jo had "scorned" Teddy's love for her, Teddy went off to Europe to sulk. Around that time, Beth was getting weaker. With all this stress, Jo went away to New York. There, she met Professor Bhaer. She fell in love with him as he helped her to cultivate her writings, helping her to write a book based on her childhood. He promised her that he would help her get it published. Beth was getting sicker and sicker, so Jo went home to help Beth. Beth died in Jo's arms. Professor Bhaer came to the March's doorstep to give Jo her published book. He asked Jo to marry him, she said yes. When Aunt March died, Jo inherited her plantation. She realized, I love boys, why not fill this house with boys that she would grow to love. So the plantation became "Jo's School for boys." The rooms were filled with the boys that she loved very much. Amy went abroad with Aunt March to help cultivate her art. There she met the crabby, snobbish, horrid side of Teddy that had come out because of Jo's answer. The more time they spent together in Europe, the more time they got to grow to love each other. They were married in Europe and Amy got the wealth and prominence she longed for as a child. This book is a wonderful tale for all. We all should read this book in our life. It belongs in our lives.

    This book had very detailed characters. Teddy is so detailed in the book, and you can actually hear them talking and his point of view on things. When Teddy got in a fight with Mr. Laurence, his grandfather, about going to college, he was so mad that when Jo meekly knocked on his door, he fired a mean insult and threatened to hurt his grandfather if he knocked one more time. Amy, at times, can be very nice in the story, but other times she was lying to make herself seem bigger than she was, and would even the score pretty well. When Jo, Teddy, Meg, and John Brooke went to the theater, Amy begged and pleaded to go, but Jo was firm, when she said no, she meant no. As they were leaving, Amy yelled at the top of her lungs to Jo, and said, I will get you back! (Not the exact words) When they came back from the theater, Jo wanted to write, but she could not find her book. She asked around, and then saw Amy watching the fire burn her book! Jo started yelling that she hated her and never wanted to talk to Amy ever again. Amy never even said she was sorry. Jo gets very fired up when something bad happens to one of her friends or family. When Amy was in school, she got in trouble, and the teacher struck her hand, and she had to stand up in front of the whole class, humiliated. When Jo heard about this, she was yelling, writing nasty letters, and was thinking about go down there and giving that teacher a piece of his mind.

    This story was very realistic. When Meg received John Brooke's invitation to wed, she refuses. Again and again, John asks, but she still says no. Rich, snobby Aunt March "overhears" and commends Meg for making such a decision, because John is dirt poor and money is one of the things that makes marriage run smoothly. Meg is appalled that Aunt March would say that. Aunt March also said that if she didn't marry in wealth, she would be cut out of her will. Meg tells Aunt March off, and tells her that John is a kind; caring, man and He would love her whether she was dirt poor or a princess. Then she realizes that she does love John, and she accepts the invitation to wed. Jo was asked to wed by Teddy, but she said no. The reason she said no was because they would always fight, like they did, with both of their tempers, they would never have a calm, cool, and collected argument, and they would never be really happy. Of course, Teddy did not understand at the time, but what Jo was trying to say was that she didn't want to be trapped in an unhappy marriage. Lastly, when Professor Bhaer proposed to Jo, He told her that his hands were empty. That meant that he would not have any money and could never buy the things that she would like. She replied, that his hands weren't empty anymore, and then she put her hands in his. This meant that she didn't care whether he had money or not, as long as he loved her, for she never cared about money, social status, or new clothes. She just loved Professor Bhaer.

    This book was very long. I loved this book, but she kept explaining every single little detail. When Beth died, she didn't just die, she died with an expression on her face. An expression that showed that she was content and ready to die, because she knew that there was nothing that the doctor could do. An expression that sent Jo into crying uncontrollably when Jo died. An expression to make Hannah, the Marches "live in cook", into sobbing while she was cooking, and saying "Too young, she was too young. She had so much strength left. See what I mean? When Amy burned Jo's book she was writing, Jo kept thinking about it, which made her even madder. When Jo and Teddy went ice staking on the pond, Amy came, but Jo and Teddy ignored her. Then, Amy fell under the ice. After that, Jo beat herself up over being mean to Amy, she even thought about either running away, or being Amy's eternal servant. When Jo was apologizing to Amy, tears were flowing and flowing down her face, and, one half of the chapter was about Jo regretting ever being mad at her. During the book, Demi, Meg's son, would get out of the bed during the night to be with his mother. John would not allow this, so every time he got up, John would take him back to his room, talk to him about why he should not get up and pop his bottom. This would go on for pages and pages without any progress. Finally, he stopped.

    This book is for everybody. I suggest for those to have the patience to read a book this long, I quite enjoyed it for it was a challenge; to read it and meditate on the lessons it shows us

    B. Rimando...more info
  • A Wonderful, Awesome Book!!

    A timeless tale that has a special place in all of our hearts, Little Women. The magical story of four girls having adventures while they lay in wait for their father to come home from the Civil War. In this tale, Meg, the eldest, marries Mr. John Brooke, Teddy's tutor, and has the life she always wanted, like her mother. Meg moved down he road from her family, and had twins, Demijohn and Daisy, becoming the model mother she always wanted to be. After Jo had "scorned" Teddy's love for her, Teddy went off to Europe to sulk. Around that time, Beth was getting weaker. With all this stress, Jo went away to New York. There, she met Professor Bhaer. She fell in love with him as he helped her to cultivate her writings, helping her to write a book based on her childhood. He promised her that he would help her get it published. Beth was getting sicker and sicker, so Jo went home to help Beth. Beth died in Jo's arms. Professor Bhaer came to the March's doorstep to give Jo her published book. He asked Jo to marry him, she said yes. When Aunt March died, Jo inherited her plantation. She realized, I love boys, why not fill this house with boys that she would grow to love. So the plantation became "Jo's School for boys." The rooms were filled with the boys that she loved very much. Amy went abroad with Aunt March to help cultivate her art. There she met the crabby, snobbish, horrid side of Teddy that had come out because of Jo's answer. The more time they spent together in Europe, the more time they got to grow to love each other. They were married in Europe and Amy got the wealth and prominence she longed for as a child. This book is a wonderful tale for all. We all should read this book in our life. It belongs in our lives.

    This book had very detailed characters. Teddy is so detailed in the book, and you can actually hear them talking and his point of view on things. When Teddy got in a fight with Mr. Laurence, his grandfather, about going to college, he was so mad that when Jo meekly knocked on his door, he fired a mean insult and threatened to hurt his grandfather if he knocked one more time. Amy, at times, can be very nice in the story, but other times she was lying to make herself seem bigger than she was, and would even the score pretty well. When Jo, Teddy, Meg, and John Brooke went to the theater, Amy begged and pleaded to go, but Jo was firm, when she said no, she meant no. As they were leaving, Amy yelled at the top of her lungs to Jo, and said, I will get you back! (Not the exact words) When they came back from the theater, Jo wanted to write, but she could not find her book. She asked around, and then saw Amy watching the fire burn her book! Jo started yelling that she hated her and never wanted to talk to Amy ever again. Amy never even said she was sorry. Jo gets very fired up when something bad happens to one of her friends or family. When Amy was in school, she got in trouble, and the teacher struck her hand, and she had to stand up in front of the whole class, humiliated. When Jo heard about this, she was yelling, writing nasty letters, and was thinking about go down there and giving that teacher a piece of his mind.

    This story was very realistic. When Meg received John Brooke's invitation to wed, she refuses. Again and again, John asks, but she still says no. Rich, snobby Aunt March "overhears" and commends Meg for making such a decision, because John is dirt poor and money is one of the things that makes marriage run smoothly. Meg is appalled that Aunt March would say that. Aunt March also said that if she didn't marry in wealth, she would be cut out of her will. Meg tells Aunt March off, and tells her that John is a kind; caring, man and He would love her whether she was dirt poor or a princess. Then she realizes that she does love John, and she accepts the invitation to wed. Jo was asked to wed by Teddy, but she said no. The reason she said no was because they would always fight, like they did, with both of their tempers, they would never have a calm, cool, and collected argument, and they would never be really happy. Of course, Teddy did not understand at the time, but what Jo was trying to say was that she didn't want to be trapped in an unhappy marriage. Lastly, when Professor Bhaer proposed to Jo, He told her that his hands were empty. That meant that he would not have any money and could never buy the things that she would like. She replied, that his hands weren't empty anymore, and then she put her hands in his. This meant that she didn't care whether he had money or not, as long as he loved her, for she never cared about money, social status, or new clothes. She just loved Professor Bhaer.

    This book was very long. I loved this book, but she kept explaining every single little detail. When Beth died, she didn't just die, she died with an expression on her face. An expression that showed that she was content and ready to die, because she knew that there was nothing that the doctor could do. An expression that sent Jo into crying uncontrollably when Jo died. An expression to make Hannah, the Marches "live in cook", into sobbing while she was cooking, and saying "Too young, she was too young. She had so much strength left. See what I mean? When Amy burned Jo's book she was writing, Jo kept thinking about it, which made her even madder. When Jo and Teddy went ice staking on the pond, Amy came, but Jo and Teddy ignored her. Then, Amy fell under the ice. After that, Jo beat herself up over being mean to Amy, she even thought about either running away, or being Amy's eternal servant. When Jo was apologizing to Amy, tears were flowing and flowing down her face, and, one half of the chapter was about Jo regretting ever being mad at her. During the book, Demi, Meg's son, would get out of the bed during the night to be with his mother. John would not allow this, so every time he got up, John would take him back to his room, talk to him about why he should not get up and pop his bottom. This would go on for pages and pages without any progress. Finally, he stopped.

    This book is for everybody. I suggest for those to have the patience to read a book this long, I quite enjoyed it for it was a challenge; to read it and meditate on the lessons it shows us

    B. Rimando...more info
  • Allies book review
    it was close to christmas and the four girls Jo,Meg,Amy, and Beth
    were in the living room playing. then later on in the story they met a boy named Lori.Beth knows how to play the piano so she goes over to Loris house to play the prettiest piano in the world to her.when the girls get older meg gets married.Lori and the girls are best friend.Lori and Jo share everything together like a brother and sister would. in the beginning of the book it describes all the girl as jo being the tomboy meg was the oldest beth was the gentle one that never was a bad girl and amy was the girly girl of the family.his father got sent to war but got sick and came back around the time beth did beth recovered partly but never completely before she died....more info
  • Heart Warming
    I have a very special place in my heart for this book, & not only because I really learned to LOVE reading as I enjoyed this book for the first time, but also because of its characters & heart-warming story. It truly is a coming of age tale of the March sisters & their unbreakable bond through all of the tough times that life places before us.

    In my opinion, this book was very relateable with situations that many of us as readers have encountered. For me, it was very nice to see such a close-knit family who loves each other so much, as opposed to the broken family homes turning up in novels so often today. (And don't get me wrong, I know how important it is to portray the 'broken' homes too-I come from one myself.)Another reason why I loved this book was because of the warm & endearing bond that the March sisters shared. I never had a sister & having the chance to peek into such a relationship between these sisters was very much so enjoyable for me.

    This novel is well-written & has obviously withstood the test of time for it is just as well-loved now as it was five, ten, or twenty years ago!


    ...more info
  • Read Anne of Green Gables instead!
    The book is the coming-of-age story of four sisters. In a very precise way, their lives together are documented in accordance with the times - of what's expected of them as women and what contradictions arise and also social situations that demand attention to several of the sisters.

    The characters are almost unreal - they're so exaggerated that one cannot help to relate SOMEHOW although weakly to any of them. Even the trials and tribulations warrant a very soft feel to them. I found myself emotionally detached to most of the situations and was scanning after near half of the reading and I feel as if I had gotten just as much out of it as I had previously.

    If you're going to read it, be a 7 or 8 year old girl learning the value of friendship and family and other kindly things that involve morals, love, and adaptation to change.

    Otherwise, read Anne of Green Gables instead. It offers just as much and more... esp. with entertaining situations that as compared to the reviewed are so much more the delightful. ...more info
  • There's a beTTer print out there!
    Little WOmen (the boOk) is a great novel, and deserves 5 stars, it's wholesome and innocent, and it's a genuine classic ... but if you want the best edition of the novel, I suggest the Barnes&Noble print of it, and that's why I gave this review only 3 stars. Unfortunately, you can only purchase it from Barnes&Noble because of their trademark name, and they don't sell to outside vendors like Amazon, or anyone else for that matter ... but for like $3 more, you get the exact same words, PLUS ~ introduction, time-line, short bio of author, end-notes, and even questions and comments at the end about the novel, and for like only $10, you can get a beautiful hardcover edition from Barnes&Noble, the cover is a beautiful painting ... although I really love this painting on the Signet Classic paperback edition too, the painting on this one is "Home Sweet Home"....more info
  • Wonderful Little Christian Novel
    When i was sixteen, my favorite book in the world was little women. i identified very much with jo march, a tomboyish girl who loves to read, go for "larks" with her best friend (the neighbor, a boy named laurie), has a short temper and dreams of one day becoming a published author.

    i longed for the companionship jo had with her three sisters, the short "romance" and the longterm firendship she had with laurie, her sucess as a writer, and finally, her romance with the german, Professor Bhear.

    this book is comical, witty, and has a wonder and warm sense of family life for those of us who hunger and thirst for love and belonging....more info
  • Not bad, but not excellent.
    I found Little Women okay, but a bit boring at times. There was absolutely no humor and I frankly didn't care what happened to the very unreal characters. The four sisters were too different to be actually related and Beth was too much of an angel. At the end of the novel, I did not find that I was attached to any of the characters.

    The book did not give me any emotional satisfaction and there were too many plots going at once.

    However, I will give some points to the quality of the plot. It was very realistic and surprising. Set during and after the Civil War, the March sisters(Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy)struggle to grow up and, if not conquer, at least suppress their worst faults.

    In short: This is an okay book, but I would never reread it.
    Recommended instead: Anne of Green Gables series(characters are much more satisfying)...more info
  • Oh, how I LOVED this book!!
    If I could give it 10 stars, I would. As someone who never had a sister, I closed this book wishing dearly that I had. Following the trials of the four March sisters was something that I didn't want to stop when the book ended. It was overall, a book of good will and good nature, full of people who are struggling to find themselves and ending up in places they never quite suspected by the end. But what I found most astonishing about Alcott's characters was how I found a little bit of myself in each one.

    What I found most fascinating was the culture of the mid-1800s- learning what was proper and not proper, and being astonished at just how much women's roles have changed since then.

    The book is a very quick and easy read, perfect for young people and adults alike. I was literally absorbed into this story, much like I was with the movie version starring Winona Ryder that was so perfectly cast and faithful to the book, I should hope that all filmmakers are as kind to the literature on which they are based.

    I highly, HIGHLY recommend Little Women!...more info
  • A must-read for all
    Little Women is, to put it simply, an great book. Any young woman with the slightest interest in reading would certainly be able to identify with at least one of the four unique sisters, and as I child I was fascinated by the predicaments and adventures of their lives- and convinced that I was in love with Jo, their charming yet complex "boy next door." This story has not lost its charm because of its powerful illustration of female (obviously, sisterly in particular) relationships, as Alcott emphasizes their commitment to each other even as they grow in separate directions and face adversity. To put it bluntly: read this book! It's an amazing classic!...more info
  • An American Classic & A Superb Read!!
    I first read Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" the summer between 4th and 5th grades. I was absolutely riveted by the story and characters and clearly remember sitting on the porch steps, my nose in the book. I cried when I reached the conclusion, because I was afraid that I had just read the best book in the world, and that I would never find anything else as good. The local librarian convinced me otherwise. I cannot recommend this novel highly enough - for people of all ages. It will always have a special place in my heart.

    Ms. Alcott writes about four young women, living in New England, during a period of much strife in America - the Civil War. They are self sufficient, creative and well educated, and each chooses a different life path, traditional and non. Considering the period when the book was written, the author's views on opportunities open to females, restricted though they were by society, is refreshing and liberating. Of course, this was not my focus as a nine year-old. The novel is long, but that never bothered me as a young girl, or much later when I reread it. I didn't want the story to end, actually.

    Sisters Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March and their beloved Marmee, (who offers her daughters guidance, comfort and unconditional love), learn to live in genteel poverty while their father, a doctor, is away treating wounded soldiers. This beautifully written classic, chronicles the girls' adolescence through womanhood, with all their trial, tribulations, and joys.

    Much of the novel focuses on Jo, the second daughter, and a gifted writer. She is very much a tomboy, and an avid reader who writes plays which the girls act-out with delight and exuberance. When they meet their new next-door neighbor, the wealthy, lonely Theodore Laurence, (called Laurie), they befriend him and invite him to become the only male member of their exclusive theater ensemble. Laurie becomes an important person in all of their lives, and the March family in his. Margaret, (Meg), the oldest, is quite lovely - a young woman with traditional values and tastes. Sensitive Elizabeth, (Beth), is the most fragile sister -quiet, caring and timid. And Amy, the youngest, is a gifted artist, with a tremendous sense of self-importance.

    Together they cope with their father's absence and their fear for his safety, severe illness in the family, a death, lack of money precluding many of life's small luxuries, romance, love, marriage and many glorious adventures. In the second part of the novel, Meg marries, Jo's writing becomes a priority, as does Amy's art. During a time of impoverishment, they learn how good it feels to give to those who are much needier than themselves. This aspect of the book is very moving. Ms Alcott brings her characters to life on the page. All of them, even minor personages, are extremely well developed.

    "Little Women" was first published in two parts in 1868 and 1869. The author drew from her own childhood experiences to dramatize the lives of the March family. The character "Marmee" is based on her own mother, Abigail May, (Abba), Alcott, whom she described as having: "A great heart that was home for all." Like Marmee, Abba was loving and passionate about women's rights, temperance, and abolition. A truly compelling and wise novel!
    JANA...more info
  • 4 "little" helpers
    This story takes place mostly at the March's house and the Laurence house which is important because it gives the reader an idea of how the each live and helps the reader understand them better.

    This book is mostly about four sisters named Margaret, Josephine, Elizabeth and Amy March,their mother Marmee March, Theodore Laurence, Mr. Laurence, they are always helping each other and others in need and are happy the way they are and will always be friends, are always thoughtful, truthful, and use manners even when talking to each other and others and even though they have very few money they still enjoy their lives and Mr.Laurence enjoys the company of them at his house, even though the Laurence's are wealthy the girls him and his grandson the same way they treat each other with respect and tells about their lives.

    In my opinion this is the best book I've Ever read ! I think this is an educational book because it teaches that money isn't everything that's better to be happy the way you are and you don't need money to be happy and you can be happy by helping people and that you should respect elders and others.

    I would recommend this book because it's educational and a good book to read when bored or just want to read a book or read an interesting book....more info
  • Little Women, American Classic
    The loveable March sisters are easy to grow on you. For my recent (14th) birthday, my 16 year old brother gave me Little Women. I read it, and it took me a while, but it was totally worth it. Occasionally, I would have to re-read sections. But that helped me to understand it, which payed off in the long run. If you're thinking of purchasing this book, a word of advise: Go for it!...more info
  • A wonderful read for all ages
    As I began the first chapter of this book, I thought I had made a mistake in purchaing it. It started off kind of "goody-goody" sounding and written for young adults. But I gave it a chance, and it paid off. As I got further into the book, I was hooked. I fell in love with the characters and kept turning the page to see what would happen next. It's a classic story for every woman. I enjoyed it so much I bought it for my 8-year-old cousin.

    The story is essentially about 4 sisters as they grow up. Each sister is unique, with different ideas and priorities. "Watching" them grow up through out the book is entertaining and heart-warming....more info
  • A Wonderful Classic
    Alcott's 'Little Women' is delightful and heartwarming, ever since I started reading it at 10 years old. The novel never fails to show me how we all make mistakes, we all fail, and we all triumph. Some of my friends have told me the book is boring, slow-paced, and idealistic. Little Women is simply about a family facing trials during the Civil War, and every chapter presents a fresh situation with a good deal of humor too. Alcott's style allows you to feel you are one of the March family, and her development of all characters is fantastic. Her details and dialogue allow the story to flow smoothly, and I've learned a lot from this great piece of American literature. I never tire of reading Little Women. It's that wonderful....more info
  • Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover
    One of the best books I've ever read. It started out that I just wanted to get more AR points than this other girl in my class who had been unable to finish the book because she had thought it was so boring. I was anticipating the worse, but I began to read it and I just fell in love with the dear little book. It was just so great! My favorite character by far was Jo. After I read it more people in my class became curious and four other people in the class read it including the first girl who gave up on it. She tried again and after she finished it she said that she had loved the book too. ...more info
  • A really bad soap opera
    This story is so incredibly melodramatic it's not even funny. Jo is such an unlikeable character. She's arrogant, fickle, and a complete drama queen. I was frustrated the whole time I read this book. I was hoping that there would at least be a good ending to this story, but the ending was the worst part of it. So Disappointing. ...more info
  • History Lessons/'Adult lessons AND nostalgia
    I decided to reread Little Women before reading the Pulitzer Prize-winning March by Geraldine Brook, which is written from the viewpoint of the family's father, off serving as a Chaplain during the Civil War.

    As always happens, as I read a favorite children's book as an adult, I find things that I love to be reminded of, but also notice how many life messages simply slipped past me during the early reading. There are some great life lessons about marriage and relationships, especially after a child is added to the mix, for example.

    There were certainly aspects of the book that come across a bit too sweet and cloying, but those are balanced by the images of a young girl Jo (and her mother Marmee) stepping out a bit from the controlling and limiting expectations on women of the time.

    I read the book now from the viewpoint of a military spouse who has also watched my husband deploy into a war zone. I also do many workshops for military spouses dealing with the current deployments so I know what they deal with. My first reaction was that the March family and mother especially had it pretty good in comparison. They have a fulltime maid Hannah for one thing, something that any military spouse would give a lot to have! But many of the emotions, thoughts and fears of current military spouses are matched in this book (and even more so in March).

    All in all a great read, a nice view into a totally different time in our history -- now I want to watch the movie again!
    Kathie Hightower, coauthor of Help! I'm a Military Spouse -- I Get a Life Too! 2d Edition...more info
  • Little Women
    It was such a good read, enjoyed it so much...I want to read more of Louisa May Alcotts work..It takes you back to that era, and makes you want to be right there with the Marches.....more info
  • Terrific price for this classic
    This version is a compact pocket size of the complete novel, a classic by a great American author. The print is quite small, due to the book's small size, but the binding is nice for a four dollar book, and my younger sister (for whom I purchased the book) is enjoying her forays into the innocent fun-filled world of Jo, Meg, Beth and Amy. Classic values of modesty, honesty, kindness and love meet challenges such as poverty, death and war, and the March sisters discover that love and faith can overcome even great obstacles. A book every young girl should read!!...more info
  • Little Women
    This book has become one of my favorites. I don't know what took me so long to read it, I've seen the movie version a few times.

    The four March sisters named Meg, Jo, Amy & Beth live in a cozy home with their mother 'Marmee' while their father is away in the Civil War. The family was wealthy at one time, but it is hinted that he helped a friend who did not repay the debt, and that is how the family ended up living in poverty. The girls do feel sad having so little, but their mother reminds them that they have more blessings than most.

    The one thing I didn't like about this book was that it got real 'cheesy' at times. At one point Jo and her professor are singing together out loud in front of family, him in his German accent none the less...lol. It also tends to get 'preachy' as well at times. Looking past that, I highly recommend Little Women. I found it to be a 'comfort book', a very sweet read. It's about family, friends and love.
    ...more info
  • Still a delight after all these years...
    I've read "Little Women" several times through the years - the first time when I was about 10 years old I guess, and always enjoyed it.

    The story is simple and sweet, but I think it still carries a strong message about the strength in the bonds of women. Progressive for the time, Alcott presents in the March women different "types" - Meg, the pretty, domestic one; Jo, the tomboyish, independent rebel; Beth, the too-good-for-this-world moral angel; Amy, the flighty, spoiled, bratty princess - at least at first; and then Marmee, the redeemed wild child who is now their strength and moral compass. The men, while not maligned are almost incidental, serving as props to highlight the different personalities of the women.

    The characters are wonderfully developed, as we see them grow through the years. The setting is very well described - you can "see" the gardens and rooms. And again, having been written for young women, the writing is easy to read and follow, if a bit long-winded. Despite Jo's detailed character development, I feel her love story was rushed and not developed enough - as opposed to those of Meg and Amy. I imagine her relationship with Bhaer is delved into more in the sequel "Little Men", which I haven't read yet.

    Although I like the book very much I think it suffers in comparison with Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice". Even though the time frame of "Little Women" - during and after the Civil War - is almost 100 years later than "Pride and Prejudice" - late 18th century/early 19th century - I think Austen's classic feels more relevant.

    I definitely recommend "Little Women" to everyone, not just pre-teen and teen girls. It's a beautiful, well-told and surprisingly progressive story.
    ...more info
  • I can always trust Amazon to have what I need immediately!
    It was great to find the book I needed quickly and for a great price as always. Thanks Amazon!...more info
  • One of those obvious classics
    I originally read this book in elementary school. I don't know what possessed me to pay the book order money to do so, but it proved to be well worth it.

    This book is a classic for many obvious reasons. There is a reason why books like this endure so long. On one hand it is simply a great story about a group of sisters who are very different and yet care for each other beyond anything.

    Then we have the Civil War story. Granted, the story doesn't exactly focus in great detail on the war, but we get a good look at what life on the homefront would have been like.

    Thirdly, this is a book about people. Louisa May Alcott does a marvelous job of getting inside her characters' heads and exploring their relationships.

    Definitely a girly book, but then again there are so many. Romantic, funny, and heart-breaking, everyone should read this. ...more info
  • Little Women
    I have seen the movie, both the old and new version. I truly like the story, but as a male student required to read this prior to 8th grade, I think I would have rather read "Little Men."...more info
  • Frustratingly realistic.
    I first read this book when I was in third grade. I was about halfway through the book when I had to fling it across the room from me in utter horror. Eventually, the pull of the book was too strong: I picked it up, finished it, and sulked for a week. And ever since then, whenever I try to reread it, I end up tossing it across the room, screaming, pulling my hair: the characters just get under your skin. You *care* about what happens to them.

    The little women are Meg, Jo, Amy, and Beth. They have flaws, just like real people: Meg is vain, Jo is boyish, and Amy is a bit of a brat. Beth is utterly angelic, and can do no wrong. But while these may sound like pasted on personalities, they're not. Over the course of such a long book, you become deeply attached to the characters, and get to know and love them.

    The story centers primarily around tomboyish Jo. She is constantly getting into scrapes, but is dedicated to her family and goes to great lengths to prove it. It's a growing up story: we follow Jo from a carefree girl who whistles and runs outside to a wife who would give everything for her husband.

    Now for the bad: Louisa May Alcott is fond of injecting moral lessons into every chapter. That might have been nice in the 1800s, but now, it can seem a bit cloying. That said, the stories themselves are enjoyable enough if you can get past the morality.

    Further, this book offers some of the most emotionally dissatisfying scenes I've ever read. Hence me throwing the book across the room. I don't want to spoil it for you; you'll know it when you get to it. And you'll be as upset as I was. So be prepared.

    Overall, Little Women is a good family story with realistic characters. Young girls will probably enjoy it the most, but I think anyone can get something out of it....more info
  • The Sticking Together Sisters
    Little Women is a story about four sisters who live with their mother. I thought it was a great story because it is really easy to figure out what they are doing in a jiff. The best part of this book is that it shows the characters have feelings and emotions that are throughtout the whole story. The story explains to me what it was like to live back in the older days. Yet to me this book seems new. If I could say who represents me most,it is Jo. Jo is a great reader and it comes in handy when she meets a boy named Laurie. Laurie is a rich kid who ends up being like family to these sisters. This story really reminds of how life is sometimes. Will you find out what happens to these sisters? Read Little Women and get into the story. I think the best rating for this book is four and a half stars. It needed a little more happiness towards the end. But still take the risk and read Little Women....more info
  • Smooth Transaction
    This was a very good transaction. The product was shipped on time and was in good condition....more info
  • Read "Little Women" a great book of love, exceptence and realization
    "Little Women"expressed to me, is that you should always be happy with what you have. I remember getting the same thing for Hanukah each year from an uncle, although my mom would always say," it's the thought that counts, not what you get, and that one should try to be happy with what one gets even if you don't like it that much, it's still something. Louisa's book describes how the 4 girls enter womanhood and they should except whatever they get. Meg, the oldest, has trouble not wanting more than what she has, for she envied her classmates with their shiny boots and beautiful dresses. Meg only realizes that other things, besides what she has she didn't want at all when her sister gets sick. The last thing on her mind is things, she realizes what a great family she has, and she didn't need things other than her family. Being grateful for what one already has is the key to happiness.-L.B....more info
  • Disappointing and waste of time.
    After reading Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre, both written in the 1800s and which I loved, I thought I'd try another classic, Little Women. What a disappointment. I couldn't even read the whole thing. I only read the first 176 pages out of 470, so if the last half is better than the first half, I wouldn't know. Thank you to other Amazon reviewers for giving me the major plot points. I skimmed a few of these and that was enough for me. I didn't want to spend any more of my time reading what I felt was a boring book. I liked three characters, Jo, Laurie and Beth, but again not enough to want to read the rest of the book. It was too syrupy sweet with the mother teaching her girls values such as helping those less fortunate than yourself, control your temper, work hard, be polite etc. These are nice values, and this might be more desirable for a parent to read to young daughters a little bit every night. Although the parent should be aware that there are a couple of deaths of main characters. For me, this book was not good enough. I want entertainment, creativity, surprise, unexpected events and interesting characters. I prefer books like Twilight and Harry Potter for young adults and myself.

    Data:
    There is no sexual content which makes it appropriate for children. Setting: 1860s the North during the civil war. Genre: fiction for young girls....more info
  • Pleasant Reading
    The book reads like a children's novel and is an extremely pleasant reading experience. Really lovely!!!!...more info
  • little women
    i loved this book soooooo much. i read it 5 times. it still never gets old. i first read it when i was 7. now im 12. istill recomend it to everyone who asks me for a book idea. i give it 5 stars...more info
  • Little Women
    Little Women's Dreaming Glasses
    I have always had extremely vivid dreams. While asleep, I have been known to shout out loud to people in my life who are hard-of-hearing; speak French; throw punches; laugh; and carry on lengthy one-sided conversations. Throughout these dramas, I am treated to Technicolor images playing on the back of my eyelids.

    At one point in my life, a friend suggested I talk with a psychologist who was well-known for her expertise in deciphering dreams. To be honest, I was pretty skeptical. It sounded like either fortune-telling, or a waste of my time, or perhaps both. Talking with this woman, however, turned out to be incredibly helpful. She did not tell me about myself, my life, or my dreams: instead, as the best guides do, she gave me the tools to find my own insights.

    Surely, this is what our best writers and most influential teachers have done for us, as well. When people write a good story, or help us to interpret those stories, they are offering us a new set of glasses to try on - a set of glasses through which we may catch a different way of looking at ourselves and our world. These glasses, whether they are labeled "Marxist", "Christian", "Feminist", "Jungian", or what-have-you, may give us deeper insight into parts of our own personality, or they may give us a view of a part of the world we've never even considered.

    In the case of the above-mentioned psychologist, she suggested I look at each object or person in my dream and see it as a representation of ...ME. So, the ugly couch is me; the thunderstorm in the background is me; the broken teapot is me, as is the table it is sitting on .... This may not help me understand every aspect of my dreams, nor every dream I have, but it is a great starting point. I have also found this to be true in my personal reading. Even if the purpose of reading a certain book is to learn about something completely foreign to you, it helps to get a foothold by finding a familiar aspect, something to which you can relate.

    Recently, I started reading Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women". This lovely little book is, unfortunately, one of many of the "classics" that I have never read. Despite the fact that I love to read, I do find "The Canon" (capitals completely intentional) rather daunting. I was surprised, then, to find myself wholly sucked in to what could be criticized as a overly simple, moralizing story, written too long ago to be relevant, in words which may now seem stilted. What could Jo, Amy, Beth, and Meg have to say to a modern woman, more than 130 years later? Why, as I devour the pages of their story, do I feel such love and sympathy for them?

    And then, I realize, in the clarity of thought that often comes as I put down a book for the night and just before sleep takes me, that these characters are ... ME. Scholars and historians who have studied the life and writings of Louisa May Alcott attest to the autobiographical aspects of "Little Women", and how Louisa created the character of "Jo" to represent herself. As I am reading, I sympathize with Jo - her stubbornness, her tomboyish ways, her fierce loyalty to her sisters and her family, her writing, her bossiness. So, at first, I say, "I am Jo." But then I realize I relate to Beth, too, especially as members of her family protect her, with her perhaps overly sensitive heart, and her health problems. And - admit it, ladies, even the toughest among us - who doesn't want, in some corner of her soul, to be "petted" and admired at times, like the little princess Amy wants to be; or to be the nurturer, older sister, eventual wife and mother, Meg. And, hey, guys, who knew that "Little Women" might be a better guide to understanding the females in your life than anything contemporary pop psychologists are writing?

    And so, with the help of this classic, I have touched base with parts of myself I haven't acknowledged in a while. The way symbols and themes and people may show up in your dreams, though you haven't consciously thought of them for a long time. This is why the great stories truly last.

    Author of "Hobo Finds A Home" editor "Of A Predatory Heart"...more info
  • A wonderful coming of age story
    When I started reading this to my children, I had to read ahead. Soon I had finished reading it to me, but not to them! My oldest has since read it. I liked this book so much better than Little Men and Jo's Boys. Girls coming of age really strike a chord with me. I wish I'd discovered these as a girl!

    I would highly recommend this classic for girls and women alike. The stories are engaging enough for boys as well, if they can get past the title. :) It definitely belongs on my list of my 10 favorite children's books of all time....more info
  • a classic piece of beautiful writing.......
    I must have read LITTLE WOMEN when I was about ten years old, yet, it is one of those exceptional examples of literature that stays with you years after you've first come to know the March sisters, their trials, triumphs, joys and sorrow. This beautiful book truly captures the strength of family, the courage one must exercise in the face of great adversity and the wisdom we are lucky to acquire if we get through it in one piece. Jo March is the epitome of the irrerepressible, hot-headed and adventurous tomboy. Her character was actually based on the personality of the author, Louisa May Alcott. Meg is the eldest and the most traditionally-minded, Beth is the more retiring, shy and selfless one and Amy is the selfish and strategic one. Together, they all are devoted to and have great respect for their mother, Marmee March, and await the arrival of their father who is serving as a chaplain for the Union Army.

    LITTLE WOMEN is the first book in a series chronicling the lives of these intriguing and well-developed characters. Even more than one hundred years later, this book still presents timeless themes of friendship, courage, dedication, faith and determination. It's not difficult to see why this story was retold so many times in film. ...more info
  • Little Women
    It was such a pleasure to meet the sisters as they were created by the aurthor. At first you feel like it was written to teach young girls their morals, but it is so much more. Ms Alcott's reflections on relationships still hold true today. For a period book, the writing is very smooth and clear enough for our generation to understand. In fact, it actually helps you to get closer to the era. ...more info
  • The Best Louisa May Alcott Novel!
    I read this book when I was a little girl and I love it as much now as I did then. The neat thing about Little Women is how I connect more with different characters during different points in my life. Romantic Amy, Rebellious Jo, Homemaker Meg, I love them all. This is a definite must read!...more info
  • A Classic
    Girls of all ages should read this book and come back to read it again as women. This novel is truly a treasure....more info
  • Quiet surprised
    Was very surprised in that I received this so quickly...one day before stated. Since was purchased for a grandchild, she will have way before Spring Break and be able to finish before returning to school....more info
  • I Loved this book
    I'm 10-years-old and I love this book! It's about friendship, sisterhood, romance, etc. This book should be on every 10-year-olds favorite reading list!...more info
  • The time has passed
    Nowadays, if they read at all, children read wide variety of texts. From SF and fantasy to Bukowski and Ginsberg. If they are too young to read they are being fed with television and video games and all of the wonders of modern society and bliss. It is hard to imagine, mother or father, somwehere out there who actually has time to sit by the bed and read to their children some story or novel of old. What's even worse is that it became hard to imagine children that are willing to await with eagerness that time in which another chapter will be read to them.

    In that sense, this book expired long time ago.

    Written in 1868., in a manner that resembled its authors views of life and her surroundings, this book stands as a monument to a time that has passed. Sometimes being didactic too much, Alcott still succeeds keeping interest for her characters. Four girls are loveable as they get, but their interactions, replicas and "life talks" with her mother often provoke vomiting.

    One mustn't forget that it is, after all, book for children, and being such, it couldn't be too much critical, or written in some manner that would shatter fragile world of children (sickness of Beth was damaging enough). As it draws itself near the and, Alcott suddenly develops sense for action, for charaters and motives which simbolises transition from youth to "life", if I'm allowed to call it that way.

    Reader of today, with his eye accustomed to different world, and his ears tuned to a different tune, will find this book completely bleak, simplistic and banal. Some more childish, or romantic will enjoy, not so much in characters and narration as in traveling to some faraway time and land. And children, the most important audience that exists, will have hard time in understanding it, without some kind of tutoring over their reading. ...more info
  • Good Social history
    I read this book after talking with a friend of mine about it. She said I would enjoy it because of the historical setting (Civil War). I took her advice end enjoyed reading it. It gives a look at the social history of the time which is all too often over looked by many authors, something about battles and war being more interesting. Don't let the title fool you, men and women will enjoy this great piece of literature despite some of the questionable events (A man marrying a women 20 years or so his junior was more acceptable back then)...more info
  • Enjoyable in Alcott's day and in ours
    This timeless story of four young sisters growing up in Civil War-era New England is the sort you can re-read over and over, picking up new details every time...

    Jo, Meg, Amy and Beth March may face serious troubles, such as poverty and concern over their father, off fighting in the war; but no matter what, their unique personalities still result in endless daily squabbles and laughs...especially when their rich but shy and isolated young neighbor Laurie gets involved.

    If you enjoy this book, be sure to pick up "Little Men" and "Jo's Boys," which continue the sisters' stories as they mature and begin their own families....more info
  • I heroic tale of little women's life
    "Little Women" by Louisa May Alcot fills my heart with suspense, love and joy. Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy go through what any young women goes through: excitment, heartbreak, and acceptance of life. They all have their "castle's in the sky", and use them to fight through the challenges of life. Any young women would appreciate the girls for their comitment, and love for the world they take role in. I find the story of Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy a page turner, and I can visualize every segment of the heroic tale. ...more info
  • Wonderful Book
    Set during the Civil War, "Little Women" is the story of the four March sisters. Meg, the oldest, is sixteen and very much into being a "young lady". Jo, fifteen, is the exact opposite of Meg, a tomboy who hates everything girlish. Beth, thirteen, is a homebody, always cheerful and looking at the bright side of things. Amy, the youngest, is loving but a bit selfish and shallow. The March's don't have much money, but they are rich in love and that love carries them throughout the course of "Little Women" which takes place over a span of ten years. The March's have many adventures as they grow up, several of them with their next door neighbor, Teddy Laurence. There is joy and sorrow in their lives, but the love they have for each other carries them through everything.

    "Little Women" is old fashioned, sentimental but not too sentimental, and a wonderful book to read. The book is partially autobiographical, based on Louisa May Alcott's own sisters and the love she had for them is evident throughout the book. There are heartbreaking parts which make me cry each and every time I read "Little Women", yet there are heartwarming and comical moments that make me smile every time I read it. The four March sisters are very realistic, even Beth, who is almost too good to be true. Alcott was an imaginative writer who could make inanimate objects, such as roses, seem alive. "Little Women" was originally written in two parts and Alcott's style changes a bit in the second part, as she addresses the reader directly and at times delivers little "sermons" to her readers.

    "Little Women" is a delightful book for readers young and old.

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  • Alcott Threw Me For A Loop!
    This may sound ridiculous, but I was bound and determined to hate this novel. I had managed to avoid it all my life, but was recently assigned the text in a graduate class on the "Study of the Novel." I consider myself a feminist, and a somewhat cynical one at that, and was sure this was going to be too "Pollyanna" for my literary tastes. I stand corrected!
    I absolutely fell in love with Jo's tomboyish headstrong character and furthermore, I must confess that next to Dolores Price (from Wally Lamb's "She's Come Undone) and David Copperfield (Dickens' own), Laurie has become one of my all-time favorite literary characters.
    There are a lot of overly religious maxims being spewed forth in the first half of the book, but it was not enough to detract from my overall enjoyment. And while the book is "light hearted" in many respects, there are many serious topics worthy of graduate level discussion, such as the suppression of feminine anger and utilization and importance of self control, inner versus outer appearances, Victorian expectations of behaviors across classes and genders, and the cause and effect of the absence of the "father" for the sisters, as well as Laurie.
    My overall literary experience has been greatly enriched by having read this book and I recommend it to all who have not yet had the pleasure of reading it. Of course, I especially recommend it to those skeptics out there, like me, who think they already have the whole thing pegged for "fluff" :)
    Alcott's "Little Women" is, without question, an American masterpiece and deserves to be on the shelves with the "Huck Finn"s and "Great Gatsby"s....more info
  • little women, great book.
    The book starts out with four teenagers, tells the story of them growing, until the four girls become little women. The four girls have very different personalities. While they are growing, many things happen to them. Here are four explanations of the four little women:

    The oldest and probally the most important to talk about is Meg. She loves to play with her sisters and to take care of them. She gets married (first) to Mr. Brooke the tudor.

    The second oldest is one year younger than Meg, named Josephine. She is a tomboy whom is a very great author. She is feircly independant, and likes people to call her 'Jo'.

    The second youngest is Beth. She is a little girl with a very shy personality, and loves music. (By the way, I was suprised of the fate to one of the girls...)

    The most young of the children is Amy. She is a very selfish, prissy, bossy, and artistic. She is the third person who marries, and she marrys "the Laurence boy". She complains to many people that her nose is flat.

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  • This is the greatest book ever written!!!!:) :>
    I just love this book!!
    YOU should READ THIS BOOK

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  • The best book I have ever read
    Little Women is without doubt the very best book I have ever read. I first picked it up about a year ago in a bookstore when |I was bored, which pretty unusual because I can usually always find something to read.
    It was the name that caught my eye. I had read a biography of Louisa May Alcott in a Social Studies textbook, and I knew about this book. But I had never read it.
    It was a small, thick copy in Scholastic Classics Edition. I opened it and the first sentence got mee hooked, about how tomboyish, bookworm Jo March wishes she had presents for Christmas.
    And then, I read on and on. I learned about grownup, sweet Meg, shy and music-loving Beth, and artistic, pretty Amy. '
    But of course I had to leave that bookstore. But my very nice aunt bought the book for me.
    In that edition the book was 560 pages long, and I finished it in less than three days.
    This terrific book of love, laughter, friendship, and family is sure to charm everyone who takes the time and patience to read its thick volume. But, believe me, it's WORTH IT!!!...more info
  • Little Women--A Review from a Point of View
    I felt that Little Women was a very moving story. I had tears in my eyes when Mr. March returns from the War. Louisa Mae Alcott was a very talented writer, indeed. I'm sure her story has touched many other hearts just as it has touched mine. Anyone, young or old, should read Little Women. It is a story of unfaltering love for one's family, even though times are hard and the limits of tempers are tested, the March family still shared its love. ...more info
  • A Child's Own Peerings
    I had the great pleasure of reading the book "Little Women," written by Louisa May Alcott, a story of real experiences and new feelings one experiences through the miracles of family and letting life take it's course; to live it to it's fullest. The March family is a true loving family who is as tightly woven as an old pair of blue jeans. In fact, they have as many stories to tell as old jeans that have been worn by so many. The March family had some hard times, but even burning of each others manuscripts can't put holes in their pockets. I believe this story is worth reading, because Louisa May Alcott defines si wekk in words how a family like the Marches can use their abilities for good and to learn a little more about life's true meaning. When I read this book I can see their life like I was a curious on-looker peering from behind a bookcase. I have become friends with these characters, and feel as if I had been a part of their noveled life. I became so engrossed in "Little Women," when it was time for the light to go off I just realized that in fact I was not touring Europe with the Carroll's, I was laying on my old lumpy mattress with sleep nipping expectantly at my eyelids. To be truthful, the books I had been reading, such as "Babysitters Club" or "Vampires Don't Wear Polka Dots" hadn't been keeping me up so late that my light bulb flickered off with a sputter.
    There are not any faults in this wonderful story that my peering from behind the shelf could notice. It was as if Alcott wrote about her own real life and saw it from all her family's point of view.
    This book may be sad in some parts, but the blue jeans threads held it together. This was so inspirational to me I decided I should be a Beth or Jo. Maybe even a Meg or Amy. This book isn't just entertainment for the young (or even old) person's mind, but it is a lesson written to fit 400 pages. It can teach you about life, I recommend it greatly.
    I will not give away the ending, but here is the summary: a dear family holds on to each other through thick and thin, and with their friend's help they still are a family. The family gets smaller then bigger, and the book ends with one sentence, "Oh my girls, however long you may live, I never can wish you a greater happiness than this," and this is where I end....more info