Pride and Prejudice - complete illustrated novel by Jane Austen. Published by MobileReference (mobi).

 
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"It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters."

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In a remote Hertfordshire village, far off the good coach roads of George III's England, Mr. and Mrs. Bennet -- a country squire of no great means and his scatterbrained wife -- must marry off their five vivacious daughters. At the heart of this all-consuming enterprise are the headstrong second daughter Elizabeth and her aristocratic suitor Fitzwilliam Darcy, two lovers in whom pride and prejudice must be overcome before love can bring the novel to its magnificent conclusion.

Customer Reviews:

  • pride and prejudice review
    we received our book in one day. the book was in excellent condition. 5 star service...more info
  • Review plus response
    One reviewer (Jane Stewart) thanked me for my input on the "revised" setting of P&P. My reasoning came after my desire to have the setting be the end of the beautiful 18th Century - not the industrialized 19th. Jane Austen wrote the book in 1796, and it was published 17 years later, but it was the SAME book, and she naturally wrote about her time period. So I deducted 17 years from 1813, which equals 1796. (Note: An astute reviewer on Amazon also pinpointed the timeframe of 1794-1796 with a French action that Jane Austen mentioned, related to P&P.)...more info
  • Overwritten, dry, dull, and cliched
    From Becoming Jane to The Jane Austen Book Club, Me and Mr. Darcy toConfessions of a Jane Austen Addict, 2007 was the year of Jane-mania, sucking out whatever satirical bite Austen might have carried two centuries ago and replacing it with syrupy tote bags and cloying t-shirts that allow a girl to declare herself, "An Elizabeth in a Darcy-less World" or (more chillingly) "Property of Mr. Darcy." In all the fervor, the only things overlooked were that Austen's prose is overwritten and dry, her plots torturously dull, and her characters one-dimensional clich®¶s....more info
  • NOT a good version for Kindle
    Note to all Kindle users - there are some books that are meant to be read on the Kindle and some that must have just been scanned into the computer. This version is in the latter group. It's AWFUL. Sometimes you only get half a screen, other times the text is different sizes. It has no table of contents for navigation. I love the book, I hate the version....more info
  • Beautiful Classic
    This book is a timeless and beloved classic. It's a beautiful story of class in Jane Austen's time that appeals to us today because it is so well-wrtitten. It's scrupulously clean morally, and I would recommend it to anyone who appreciates the time when love stories were wholesome and pure and touching. All the characters have an appeal that's makes you appreciate the way they fit into the story....more info
  • Mr. Darcy!
    This is my all time favorite Jane Austen novel.
    I love the story line, I love the characters. The love story between Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet is timeless. Darcy is very rich, educated and handsome. He is the quiet reserved type. And of course he is very proud.

    'If you will thank me,'' he replied, ``let it be for yourself alone. That the wish of giving happiness to you might add force to the other inducements which led me on, I shall not attempt to deny. But your family owe me nothing. Much as I respect them, I believe I thought only of you.'
    ...more info
  • Justifiably a Classic
    This novel begins with one of the most recognizable lines in literary history: "It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife." With that begins, perhaps, the most copied plot-line in human history. Sisters Elizabeth and Jane Bennett are of a marrying age. When a handsome and wealthy young man comes to stay in their neighborhood, the Bennetts waste little time making his acquaintance. It turns out the handsome newcomer, Charles Bingley, is a fine and friendly gentleman and he has a liking for Jane.

    Mr. Bingley's cohort, Fitzwilliam Darcy, is, however, not nearly so friendly. Cold and formal, he quickly incurs the dislike of Elizabeth. Mr. Darcy, though, appears somewhat taken by Elizabeth and makes some half-hearted advances. Despite his great wealth, Elizabeth distaste grows the more she learns of Mr. Darcy's past.

    Just as the relationship between Jane and Mr. Bingley appears set for matrimony, Mr. Bingley suddenly leaves the neighborhood. Certainly, it seems, this is the doing of Mr. Darcy. Jane's hopes dashed and Elizabeth finding only comically unsuitable suitors, the Bennett sisters are headed for old-maidom. That is, unless the terrible events are due to improper pride and/or prejudice.

    Though I am not a great Jane Austen admirer and find much of her writing overly ornamental and preoccupied with unimportant subject matter, there is no disputing the greatness of this novel. The language usage is clearly Austenesque, but this book is nevertheless genuinely a page turner. Moreover, the tone is pitch perfect - touching the emotions, but maintaining an appealing comic feel. I found myself delighted to be in the company of Jane Austen who, though her writing is over two centuries old and her experiences obviously much different from ours, has a surprisingly modern voice.

    Even more importantly, this book is an invaluable cultural gift. Though perhaps not in the same league as the Bible or some of Shakespeare's works, the influence of Pride and Prejudice on our culture is simply vast. Familiarizing yourself with Pride and Prejudice will make literally hundreds of cultural products more comprehensible (or reveal them to be unoriginal). The plot-line alone has spawned countless imitations, slight modifications and commentaries. The characters, especially Elizabeth and Darcy, have become veritable archetypes. This is one of those stories that you are already familiar with through its imitators. None, however, has done the material so well and so thoughtfully as Ms. Austen.

    Even if you don't have the stomach for Ms. Austen's other material, this novel is worth reading. It's both good for you and an enjoyable read - often a tough mix to find....more info
  • My Favorite Book
    Jane Austen's classic, Pride and Prejudice, is perhaps my favorite book of all time. Miss Austen's trademark wit and whimsy style of writing is appealing to readers of all ages, even to a modern teen like me. I find something, many things, to relate to within the main character, Elizabeth Bennet, as I, like she, "[takes] delight in anything ridiculous." Since the moment I read that infamous line: "It is a truth universally acknowledged......" I have considered myself to be a firm and loyal Janeite, joining the ranks of thousands of hopeless romantics and head-strong women whom only hope to one day find their Mr. Darcy.

    Between the playfulness of Miss Bennet and the comically formalness of Mr. Darcy lies a classic lesson to be learned. Originally, Jane Austen thought to name this tale "First Impressions", as the moral of the story lies within the importance of not relying on just that. Lizzie Bennet's fatal --- or perhaps only --- flaw is her characteristic quickness to judgement, which nearly cost her the love of her life. Although by the end of the story one is almost always in love with Darcy, his personality at the beginning of the story is purposefully icy and rigid, depicting him as the perfect example of an excess of pride. By the end of the tale, however, Darcy stands proud as perhaps the most romantic hero of all time.

    Prepare to be "bewitched body and soul" by the whit and wisdom and Miss Austen, perhaps the most perfect romantic author of all time. In addition, plan to be enchanted by the playfulness of Lizzie, charmed by the misadventure of Darcy, rendered speechless by the nerve and lack of tact within the Mrs. Bennet, charmed by the sweetness of Jane and Bingley, enraged by both Miss Bingley and Lady Catherine, and most of all, infuriated by the ridiculousness and insufferability of Lydia and Kitty. There is always something to take from a story so perfect and so classic as this. I make it a point to return to it's familar story at least once a month. This beautifully penned tale only stands to prove that Love, more often than not, will be not so easily defeated. ...more info
  • best Austen novel - so far
    After seeing a number of adaptations, I finally decided to read all of
    Austen's novels. Northanger Abbey was not bad, and Sense and Sensibility
    is excellent. However, this is the best so far. While there is a lot of
    insightful comment on the custom of English society of the time, and
    discussion of the character's motivation, the book just sparkles during
    the interchanges between them. While those between Elizabeth
    and Mr. Darcy are justifiably famous, I would say that many of the others
    are at the same level. My favorite are perhaps the interchanges between
    Lady Catherine and Elizabeth. I am very much looking forward to reading
    the remaining three completed novels....more info
  • Classic
    There isn't much else to say about this book that hasn't been said.

    One of the best novels ever written, for its humor, plot, and excellent insight into the quirky-but-real relationships of everyday people.

    Truly a classic. ...more info
  • Classic
    This book is a classic and a must read for everyone. Its a perfect book for students in school to read. I love the love/hate relationship between Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth....more info
  • Delightfully Perfect
    Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is one of the most delightful books I have ever read. It is the perfect blend of humor and romance, and every time I read it, I love it even more than I did the time before.

    Pride and Prejudice is the story of Elizabeth Bennet. She is one of five sisters with a rather silly mother whose only purpose in life is to marry off her daughters. With the exception of Elizabeth and sensible, good-hearted Jane, each sister is also remarkably silly in her own way. Because of her intelligence and wit, Elizabeth Bennet stands apart from the rest of her sisters. When Elizabeth first comes in contact with the proud Mr. Darcy at a town assembly, she isn't even considered handsome enough to tempt him to dance, even though she is reputed to be a local beauty. Throughout the novel Mr. Darcy is increasingly attracted to Elizabeth's intelligent and lively mind as well as her physical beauty while Elizabeth seems unaware of his increasing regard. Unfortunately, the lack of propriety among most of Elizabeth Bennet's family is a huge stumbling block to someone as proper and refined as Mr. Darcy.

    Pride and Prejudice, with its large cast of amusing characters, exposes the follies of human nature in the most humorous light. It is a novel I think anyone would be hard pressed not to enjoy....more info
  • Clasic Romance Novel
    Jane Austen is an amazing author! I loved this book. I got a little frustrated with it sometimes, but I'm very glad I decided to keep reading it. Pride and Prejudice will always be a clasic. I plan on reading the rest of Jane Austen's books also. Highly recommended....more info
  • as always, better than the movie
    I enjoyed this book thoroughly. It takes a little bit of time to get used to the language used, but once you get into it, it is hard to put down. A true romance. Why doesn't it happen like that anymore? :) ...more info
  • A classic that can be read again and again
    I've read this book twelve times, and I will never get bored with it. I'm hoplessly romantic, and I love the different conflicts, the interesting and independent characters, the plot twists, and the happily ever after at the end. Elizabeth Bennet is an independent, youthful, clever, and witty young woman in the eighteen hundreds. She is my favorite character in the novel, and has a wonderful spunky nature that keeps the book alive. The characters are fully formed and realistic, from beautiful Jane to the hilarious Mrs. Bennet. This is, by far, the best Jane Austen book ever published, and recommend it very strongly for anyone starting to read eighteenth and nineteenth century literature. ...more info
  • Pride and Prejudice
    It seriously does not get any better than this! This book unfolds slowly allowing you to fall in love with the characters and get a feel that world and time. An amazing love story, it leaves you wanting more!...more info
  • Drivel
    This is a terrible novel. I was expecting a "classic" when I read this and the only reason that I can think of for this book to be considered a classic is because it was written by a woman at a time when women were repressed in society. The plot is shallow. It is simply a love story with a few hints of irony thrown in. The characters are very unlikable. In fact, I hate the characters because they are shallow and self-centered. Also, Austen clearly never learned that readers do not like run-on sentences because the so called "novel", consists of run-on sentences that sometimes consist of more than one page. Austen also describes everything way too much, when one sentence is clearly enough. This novel is complete trash, and I really regret having to read it for my literature class. I could have simply read the celebrity tabloids, and I would have been exposed to as informative and moving of a story as this piece of trash.

    ...more info
  • Boy oh boy was I ever wrong about Lady Jane!!!
    "Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves; vanity, to what we would have others think of us." Jane Austen

    I let my own foolish pride, my own ignorant prejudices; deter me from ever picking up a Jane Austen achievement until about a month ago when I finally decided to give her a shot. This classic novel was definitely not on my `must read' list, but somehow, someway, it landed on my lap one afternoon and I decided to at least take a quick peek at it while no one else was looking. After all, a man's man like myself (whatever that means nowadays) has no time to read early 19th century Chick Brit Lit., let alone a sweet, love story like this one. Especially during football season! I could almost hear Bukowski's ghost laughing at me when I opened up the first page and read those unforgettable first lines regarding man and marriage. However, I forged on, just Jane and I, and when it was all said and done - I can't believe what a fool I've been all these years! Yes, this classic is a thing of beauty. And like Jane's main protagonist and narrative voice in the novel - Elizabeth Bennet - I too learned a valuable lesson about not judging a book by its cover. Isn't evolution great?

    Don't make the same mistake I did. I love classic literature, but for too long now I avoided such greats as the Bronte's, Wharton, Cather, et al... because of my foolish male ego, my ridiculous machismo pride. My biggest regret though, was avoiding Austen all these years. Now, I may not go out and rent the movie anytime soon (of course the wife made me promise that I would watch it with her after I introduced her to "Scarface" the other night), but I will definitely be purchasing some more of Jane's classics (Emma, Persuasion, Mansfield Park, etc...) and if they are anything like this pleasant surprise, I am going to be one happy camper.

    Never a dull moment, never a page not worth perusing, simply put - Austen is awesome!
    ...more info
  • What a Year for the Bennets
    As much as this book revolves around three of the four daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Bennet, all of those characters revolve around Mr. Darcy - whose personality and character matures and unfolds before you.

    Neither poor nor rich, the Bennets cannot establish great wealth and comforts for their children - and Mrs. Bennet's hard opinionated character further deprives the lovely lasses of possibilities for advancement. But, through the character weakness(es) will come happiness in all levels - where some smile and others are more joyous and laugh. And, thee events happen quickly, all within one year's time.

    Darcy, who adores his 10-years-younger sister Georgiana, is the proper gentleman who has never raised his voice during his 28 years. Elizabeth, her father's favorite and mother's least, befriends Mr. Darcy and soon aggravates his senses and challenges him to make it to 29 without harsh verbal exchange or raised voice.

    After some embarrassingly wrong misconceptions of his character, and equally wrong characterizations about a person whose life has plagued Darcy's, Elizabeth watches the young man blossom as he singlehandedly controls her family's pitfalls, confronts those who attempt to deliver her family to near disasters and financially saves the family from other possible misfortunes. In such actions, Darcy has to befriend an enemy, deliver embezzled money, negotiate with creditors of his enemy, and more. And, all for love - and who ever said love would be easy?

    Pride is swallowed not only by Darcy, but by so many others in this novel. "Pride. . . is a very common failing. . . Human nature is quite proud of some quality or other, real or imaginary." We learn, "Vanity and pride are different things." "Pride rises from a good opinion of ourselves; vanity from what we would have others think of us."

    We are wrongly told ". . . almost all his [Darcy's] actions may be traced to pride, and pride has often been his best friend." In the end, we learn Darcy ". . . has no improper pride."

    Interestingly, prejudice is not a word defined, used or explained like its title counterpart. But, prejudice is a concept belying each page, each acquaintance, each personal affront, and somehow is easily overcome by youthful passion. Prejudice helplessly loses amidst the betrothing of the three daughters full of young passion.

    In the end, a Cinderella-like conclusion befits the young hearts' defiance to prejudice through passion. And, in the persuasive methods of young Elizabeth, the originally perceived overbearing pride of Darcy evolves into what she describes to be proper pride.

    If there is one thing this reader enjoys in this Austen book it is the dialogue. Whether it be the hindered ire of Darcy in civilly responding to Elizabeth's overzealous impertinence, or Elizabeth's steadfast refusal to succumb to Lady Catherine's requests that she never wed her nobleman nephew, the calm and polite retorts are deliciously phrased and eloquently presented. Few plays can match such work....more info
  • Pride & Prejudice--all time favorite book and movie
    I love Jane Austen all around, but most especially Pride & Prejudice. If I can't find anything else to read, I pick up P & P. Austen is so very clever, and the multifaceted storyline never gets old....more info
  • Who am I to critique such a classic work by Jane Austen?
    Not someone properly suited for such a task, I can tell you that. What I can do, however, is give an honest and heartfelt account of what I thought of Jane Austen's 'PRIDE & PREJUDICE'. I have always wanted to read some of the classics but have never up until now dug up the courage to actually do so. I thought if I was going to start reading a classic novel Jane Austen would probably be a good author to start with and what better choice was there than her stand out 'PRIDE & PREJUDICE' ? I was pleased to find out that I was absolutely right. 'PRIDE & PREJUDICE' has to be one of the most romantic novels that I have ever read. The romance between Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy literally made me swoon quite often (and I don't swoon!). Romance mixed with a little bit of drama and Austen's most descriptive prose made it impossible for me to put this book down. Now I see why 'PRIDE & PREJUDICE' is on so many people's favorites list because now it is most certainly on mine....more info
  • Pride and Prejudice
    For the first time ever, I liked the movie (w/Colin Firth version) way better than the book....more info
  • One of my favorite books
    This is an absolutely wonderful book! It is a timeless story about the tangled relationship between Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy. What I love so much about this book is how relevant these situations still are and how easy it is to relate to all of the characters. I have read other Jane Austin novels, and so far this is by far my favorite. Elizabeth is such a strong female character, and Mr. Darcy is a wonderfully complex and interesting male character. This is definitely one of my "comfort books." Whenever I have had an unpleasant day or need to relax, rereading Pride and Prejudice always makes me feel better. Truly, it is on of the best books I've ever read. ...more info
  • Classic Fave
    This is probably the most classic romance novel of all time. I get shivers every time I re-read it and fall in love with the story over and over. While I love most of Austen's other books, this is the one I return to at least once a year. ...more info
  • noisy...
    This is not a good recording. Too much noise and
    the voice sounds muffled. The discs are CD-Rs,
    not Audio CDs.

    Looks like it was made in a garage by
    indifferent migrant workers.
    Promptly returned.

    Very poor quality product,
    not recommended....more info
  • Clasic Romance Novel
    Jane Austen is an amazing author! I loved this book. I got a little frustrated with it sometimes, but I'm very glad I decided to keep reading it. Pride and Prejudice will always be a clasic. I plan on reading the rest of Jane Austen's books also. Highly recommended....more info
  • Looks good
    Haven't had a chance to read the book yet. But, it looks like it will be a great read. The book came as promised. It is a paperback - but a high quality one. If you are looking for this classic, I do recommend this printing....more info
  • My favorite Jane Austen Book
    If you have never read any of Jane Austen's books, I recommend you read this one. Definitely her masterpiece. Wonderful love story, great characters. You won't want to put it down....more info
  • A nice plunge into the past
    The core character in this novel is Elizabeth, an attractive and intelligent 20 year-old and the second daughter (out of five) of Mr. and Mrs. Bennet. . Her mother's main interest is to see her five daughters, all eligible, nicely settled down and married to respectable and rich gentlemen.
    Elizabeth's personality, very unlike her mother's, unfolds throughout the pages in a crescendo of emotions resulting from various issues connected with the whole family saga and especially to her own contrasting feelings towards a certain young man, Mr. Darcy. Will Elizabeth's passionate and sensible nature, combined with a certain degree of boldness (for those days), make her discover what lies beyond his seemingly unpleasant and unreadable personality?
    The graceful politeness in the prose is charming, delineating a faithful image of life at the end of the 18th century in England.

    The intrigues beyond wished-for marriages are very accurately described by Ms. Austen, with a touch of humour "hither and thither". I could not help myself comparing similar issues with nowadays. Beyond the characterisation and a part from the language, style and general progress, I believe that human nature, as depicted, is the same as it always was and it is not all just about "love", it is also about people attempting to incorporate into a higher position in society, seeking integration at a greater level. It was also interesting, I thought, to see how relevant (or irrelevant) the "worth" bestowed on the female gender was back then, compared to the present day in most societies. This, combined with the rapidity with which one fell in love, got engaged and/or was forbidden or denied to marry, could be stimulating subjects for ensuing conversations.
    ...more info
  • THE quintessential romance
    This book speaks to every romantic. It's written beautifully in the classic language that every man and woman speaks while in the throes of the mating game. I read this book at least yearly to remind myself of not only the gloriously beautiful fluent English language and wit of Miss Bennett, but the always refreshing humility, which this book's title fails to mention. It is truly a beautiful piece of romantic literature. The sensual / sexual tension between Miss Bennett and Mr. Darcy is something I never tire of. ...more info
  • A Nice Novel
    I enjoyed Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen, with the exception of two things.

    First, the version that I read has a nauseating, fan-boy introduction. I don't particularly care which version of this book you purchase; you should skip the introduction. Just in case. This is not the fault of the author, but of the editor, and I will not ding the author because of its presentation - especially hundreds of years after her death. It would be dirty pool.

    Second, there is a single passage in the novel which details Elizabeth's growth as a character, where she, introspectively, weighs in on how she feels she has developed. This was out of character for her. She spends much of the novel in angst about various things (such as Mr. Bingley's interactions with her sister Jane, Mr. Darcy's feelings for her, and vacillating between like and dislike for Mr. Darcy himself). The loss of this paragraph would have, in no way, mutilated the perception of Elizabeth as a cogent and erudite character with a mind of her own that was well-working. Nor would its absence have colored an intelligent reader's perception of her growth.

    Mr. Bennet, however, was hilarious. His steadfast perception of all of the women around him (excepting Elizabeth) as being irredeemably foolish was, I think, a major highlight of the book. Not because it was accurate (although it certainly was in the case of the youngest daughter, Lydia), but because it highlights and gently satirizes the perception of ladies at this time in England. This is made particularly clear in the case of his wife, who is the most grasping fictional woman since Becky Sharp. The juxtaposition of Mr. Bennet's foolish perceptions of women (as themselves being foolish), and the intelligence of two of his daughters (Jane and Elizabeth) faithfully, I believe, points out one of the main purposes of Ms. Austen's writing: To throw into stark contrast the difference between the commonly, culturally accepted perceptions of women (e.g., Mr. Bennet) and the reality of their perceptions and their intelligence (e.g., the two eldest Bennet sisters). This was, in my perception, one of the most important purposes of Ms. Austen's writing, and she performed it well.

    The interactions between Elizabeth and several of the other characters, especially Lady Catherine De Bourgh, are often times hilarious. Other times, such as her frequent misperceptions of Mr. Darcy and her excercise of her sometimes rapier wit at his expense, are less amusing than they are painful; not because of their inaccuracy or their sharpness, but more because an astute reader will realize the reality of Mr. Darcy's character much earlier than Elizabeth does. And once that point is reached, and even before, it is hard to take her chidings with equanimity. Even if he is a jerk, he is still a human being, and it seems malicious of Elizabeth to treat him this way. Unlike some, I will not excuse her behavior as common for the times, because Elizabeth seems...transcendent of her times in some ways, much like the author herself.

    This was, by and large, a very entertaining book. It is well worth reading, whether you are curious about the foundations of romantic comedy (which got their first big push in the public here), in the time period of the Napoleonic War (which doesn't figure in the novel, but the social interactions of the time are well detailed), a fan of novels of manners (such as this one, Sense and Sensibility, and Emma, by the same author, Thackeray's Vanity Fair, or Evelyn Waugh's A Handful of Dust), or just in the mood for a fun book. If I could, I would give it 4.5 stars.

    A

    Harkius...more info
  • Beautiful Classic
    This book is a timeless and beloved classic. It's a beautiful story of class in Jane Austen's time that appeals to us today because it is so well-wrtitten. It's scrupulously clean morally, and I would recommend it to anyone who appreciates the time when love stories were wholesome and pure and touching. All the characters have an appeal that's makes you appreciate the way they fit into the story....more info
  • One of the best novels ever written
    I have read this novel 6 times and I never get bored of this novel! It seems every time I read this novel that I realize something new about the characters that Jane Austen so cleverly created and what's more is that I enjoy the novel each time as much as I did the first time I read it!! I would definitely recommend this novel to anyone who enjoys a great classic with whitty characters and an excellent love story. ...more info
  • A Classic
    A classic that should be read by anyone interested in expanding their vocabulary, and their use of the english language...more info
  • Comedy of social manners
    This -its author's most popular novel-revolves around the Bennett family which consists of Mother,Father and 5 daughters.The family is not wealthy and marrying off the progeny to suitable young men is a financial necessity, something felt particularly sharply by the Mother.The family and the district roundabout is thrown into confusion by the arrival of 2 wealthy young men both of whom are unattached.There is Charles Bingley who leases a house close to the Bennett home ,and his friend Mr Darcy with whom he shares. Visits are exchanged between the households and Bingley falls in love with the eldest Bennett daughter ,Jane.The second daughter ,Elizabeth, and Darcy circle each other warily.There is much verbal sparring and Elizabeth-clever,witty and ironic-finds herself intrigued by Darcy while being repelled by his apparent aloofness and seemingly arrogant demeanour.She also hears negative things of him from other people.Events conspire to keep the pair apart and a mix of social snobbery,self-will and just plain misunderstandings are other barriers that must be overcome if true love is to triumph over its enemies -pride and prejudice.
    I have concentrated above on the relationship between darcy and Elizabeth but while this is the key relationship in the book it also has some well drawn supporting figures such as Lady Catherine de Bourgh ,a monster of snobbery and self-satisfaction personifying the aristocaracy at its worst and Mr Collins ,the oleaginous and toadying clergyman whose true colours emerge in his cringe worthy proposal to Elizabeth.
    The book is popular as a romance and while recognising this dimension to it have to say that for me it works best as a social comedy and an acute dissection of manners and relationships.It is among the great literary comedies as well as romances and is very clear eyed and unsentimental about such matters as marriage and social convention .

    This is not just a museum piece and deserves its wide readership...more info
  • Excellent Book
    Best romance book ever written and one of the top ten books of all time, in my opinion. Jane Austen has a remarkable skill for capturing cultural snapshots and portraying the essence of human nature like no other author I can identify. I also love the BBC movie version for the complete story and the recent movie with Keira Knightly for the highlights. I only purchase the Barnes and Noble collection for my classic books because they look nice together on shelves and have interesting introductions....more info
  • 5 billion stars
    I have no right to review Jane Austen. I give this book 5 billion stars....more info
  • Jane Austen's "Sex and the Country"
    PRIDE AND PREJUDICE was the first book I downloaded onto my Kindle. How is it possible that this adorable, timeless love story is now almost 200 years old? I read this book while in high school and could not admit to anyone how much I loved it. There weren't a lot of Jane Austen book clubs for high school boys back then and white-bread suburbia did not lend itself to those types of disclosures. However, reading it and EMMA and JANE EYRE and Dickens spoiled me forever for good storytelling. To this day, I am drawn to novels of eternal themes: love, sex, family and friends. I don't mean to trivialize Jane Austen with my pithy Candace Bushnell nod, but Pride and Prejudice has all of the intrigue and sex and love of Sex and the City--we just can't see it. And, let's face it--Big is Darcy. . .200 years later. . ."abso--f'in--lutely." ...more info
  • 18th Century Chick Lit
    I am so disappointed. Being a fan of classic literature I was looking forward to reading Pride & Prejudice. But what I got was moderately-well written chick lit. Think of Pride and Prejudice as the Bridgit Jones of the 18th Century.

    The story-line is predictable - you know how the whole novel is going to play out after the first couple of pages. The only thing that kept me going was the hope that there would be some little twist. Maybe Jane would end up with Darcy, or something a little more interesting. Unfortunately not.

    I honestly think Austin was writing a parody of women. The only concern of every female character in the book is to get married to a rich, well-to-do gentleman. Of course, some will argue that Elizabeth is different, but as she states herself, her interest in Darcy is only aroused when she sees what a wonderful estate he owns and considers that she may be the lady of it. Each of the female characters are shallow, self-centred (Jane excepted) and vacuous.

    On the positive side, some of the characters are interesting - Mr. Bennet is amusing, and Darcy started out being intriguing before turning into a school girl-like idiot.

    Perhaps, if you're a fan of straight-down-the-line, predictable romantic (semi comedic at times) novels then you might enjoy this. But don't expect to find a masterful tale, expertly told. Unfortunately that is what I was expecting (it being a "classic" and all) and I was totally disappointed. I really think this is one of the worst books I have ever read....more info
  • The violence of my affections.
    I don't know how it came about that - after avoiding it in high school and watching two movie versions of it - I found myself reading PRIDE AND PREJUDICE. I didn't think that the book would be able to much surprise me. But, my goodness, this book is one of the most delightful, compellingly readable pieces of fiction I have ever found. And, oddly enough, knowing the story through the movies made the surprises that the book has to offer all the more valuable.

    The language Austen uses is fantastic. The book is charming and very funny. The characters are all fully developed and funny, from the annoying Mrs. Bennet to the startling, judgmental Mr. Collins. And the romance is wonderful.

    Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy are great characters, and I'm glad to finally be acquainted with them in their original form....more info
  • A Must Read
    I loved this book and Persuasion as did my husband. It is a wonderful and well wriiten story. Someone mentioned in another review that they thoght the paper quality to be poor, but its not. The book is of excellent make....more info
  • Drivel
    This is a terrible novel. I was expecting a "classic" when I read this and the only reason that I can think of for this book to be considered a classic is because it was written by a woman at a time when women were repressed in society. The plot is shallow. It is simply a love story with a few hints of irony thrown in. The characters are very unlikable. In fact, I hate the characters because they are shallow and self-centered. Also, Austen clearly never learned that readers do not like run-on sentences because the so called "novel", consists of run-on sentences that sometimes consist of more than one page. Austen also describes everything way too much, when one sentence is clearly enough. This novel is complete trash, and I really regret having to read it for my literature class. I could have simply read the celebrity tabloids, and I would have been exposed to as informative and moving of a story as this piece of trash.

    ...more info
  • A True Classic
    Pride and Prejudice is Jane Austen's most popular novel and it is remarkable that it has sustained such a high popularity 200 years after it was originally published. The primary plot of the story follows Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy in a highly contentious courtship that begins with mutual contempt but evolves quite unexpectedly for both into very different feelings. Subplots involve her sister Jane and Mr. Bingley in a courtship of their own as well as the romantic entanglements of various other sisters and friends. The story is a bit of a roller coaster ride with soaring hopes and crushing disappointment in store as events unfold. I won't reveal the ending for the handful of people who haven't read it but suffice to say that the novel concludes in a way that leaves the vast majority of readers well satisfied.

    Darcy and Elizabeth are complex and multi-layered characters who both grow and change somewhat as the book progresses. They are the heart and soul of the book and about as well fleshed out as any characters you are likely to see. The supporting characters, however, are considerably less deep and are more caricatures than anything else. Some are good and kind like Jane and Mr. Bingley, and others are ridiculous and vain like Mrs. Bennet but none are remotely as substantial as Darcy and Elizabeth. So, does this ruin the book? Hardly. These secondary characters offer a wealth of material for the author as she plays them off of Darcy and Elizabeth.

    This novel is almost certainly the one where Austen best displays her sharp-edged wit both through Elizabeth's dialogue and in the narrative voice describing some of these characters and their actions. If some of them were less ridiculous, the potential for the satire would be weakened considerably. And make no mistake, Pride and Prejudice is as much a satire of the time it was written, as it is a romantic drama. Even today, the prose is quite funny and enjoyable.

    In summary, this is a great novel. Admittedly, there were a few times where I thought a character's behavior was a bit over-the-top but the overall story is so riveting and the book so compelling that I just can't find any serious fault with it. Pride and Prejudice is deserving of its reputation and I highly recommend it to Austen fans and newcomers alike....more info
  • Jane Austen's "Sex and the Country"
    PRIDE AND PREJUDICE was the first book I downloaded onto my Kindle. How is it possible that this adorable, timeless love story is now almost 200 years old? I read this book while in high school and could not admit to anyone how much I loved it. There weren't a lot of Jane Austen book clubs for high school boys back then and white-bread suburbia did not lend itself to those types of disclosures. However, reading it and EMMA and JANE EYRE and Dickens spoiled me forever for good storytelling. To this day, I am drawn to novels of eternal themes: love, sex, family and friends. I don't mean to trivialize Jane Austen with my pithy Candace Bushnell nod, but Pride and Prejudice has all of the intrigue and sex and love of Sex and the City--we just can't see it. And, let's face it--Big is Darcy. . .200 years later. . ."abso--f'in--lutely." ...more info
  • Jane Austen's MASTERPIECE!!!
    Ah, what girl doesn't want Mr. Darcy to marry them? I have to admit, as and avid Austen fan, I'm a bit obsessed with this one. One cannot come upon better characters than the beautiful and witty (way to be a smart girl!) Elizabeth Bennet, and the tall, brooding, but devilishly handsome (not to mention exceptionally rich) Mr. Darcy. And of course, what better way to start off a romance than with two characters who hate eachother? And Austen does it complete justice--for we all know that they can't stay disgusted for long! However, did we ever expect Lizzy to actually refuse a man who has ten thousand pounds a year? Heck yes! And that's why we love her. I've never come across an author better able to create stunning characters than Miss Jane Austen herself. She's timeless. I highly recommend this book to every person who comes across it. Pride and Prejudice merits the title of MY FAVORITE piece of literature ever written! ...more info
  • Ahh Jane Austen
    I'm very biased because this is my favorite book of all time by one of my favorite autors. The story comes alive, the characters come alive. To me after years of reading and rereading the story, these characters are like people that really lived and I feel like I know them better then alot of real people. Wonderful book, if you've never read Jane Austen, start here and enjoy!...more info
  • Pride and Prejudice: The Source....
    Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice", first published in 1813, is considered her best novel. It continues to be a fertile source of material for television and film adaptations. First marketed as a romance, "Pride and Prejudice" might today be labeled a romantic comedy. Its enduring appeal lies partly in Austen's biting and still relevant social commentary on the rituals leading to marriage as practiced in Regency-era England.

    "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a good wife." So begins the story, as the five eligible young Bennet daughters and their scheming mother learn of the arrival in their small English village of a wealthy young man and his wealthy friends. A village dance provides the opportunity to meet the newcomers. The wealthy young man, Mr. Bingley, quickly becomes attracted to Miss Jane Bennet, the pretty, even-tempered, but reserved oldest sister. Elizabeth Bennet, the spirited and headstrong second sister, meets but immediately dislikes his seemingly haughty friend Mr. Darcy. Elizabeth is more interested in the charming young Army officer Mr. Wickham, who feeds her derogatory stories about Mr. Darcy that she is all too prepared to hear. As the relationship between Mr. Bingley and Jane deepens, Elizabeth is ardently courted by her cousin Mr Collins, an obnoxious and clueless clergyman. Elizabeth, to the despair of her mother, will not have Mr. Collins, who instead marries her spinster friend Charlotte. When Mr. Bingley suddenly departs the village without proposing to Jane, Elizabeth soon suspects the proud Mr. Darcy of curtailing the relationship based on Jane's lesser social status. While visiting Charlotte, Elizabeth is astonished to receive a proposal of marriage from Mr. Darcy, which she refuses in the most scathing terms.

    This failed proposal is the dramatic crux of the story. Mr. Darcy, mortified by Elizabeth's refusal and by her accusations with respect to his pride and his actions toward Jane and Mr. Wickham, writes a long letter to her. The letter, if not exactly an apology, makes clear that Wickham's accusations were false, and that Mr. Darcy's actions in separating Mr. Bingley and Jane were based on the perception that Jane was less enthusiastic about marriage than her intended partner. Elizabeth begins to realize that she has been guilty of prejudice as well, a feeling reinforced by a chance meeting with Mr. Darcy and his adoring sister at his home of Pemberly in Darbyshire. When Elizabeth's flirtatious younger sister Lydia elopes with Mr. Wickham, Mr. Darcy will have the opportunity to prove his character and his love to Elizabeth.

    Austen's novel contains a huge cast of well-developed characters and a series of cascading social mishaps, yet the story remains tightly focused on the relationship between Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy. They are attracted to each other fairly early in the story, yet are unable to appreciate each other's qualities for pride and prejudice.

    Underlying the humor in the social mishaps is a grim economic reality of Regency England, that failure to make a good marriage could doom middle class women like Jane and Elizabeth to a life of poverty. For Elizabeth's friend Charlotte, still single at 27, a loveless marriage to Mr Collins brings the saving grace of financial security. Lydia's elopement with Mr. Wickham not only disgraced her family but threatened to make her sisters ineligible for marriage as well. The Bennet family's lack of social standing and manners was a serious barrier to the making of good marriages, a fact less obvious to today's readers.

    Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" features a engaging plot, lots of excellent dialogue and two classic romantic characters in Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy, a combination that holds up astonishingly well nearly two hundred years on. It is very highly recommended to fans of the various Jane Austen film productions as the entertaining source of the story....more info
  • BedBook
    The "BedBook" format is so unusual, it should be made more clear to purchasers....I wouldn't have been interested if I had known this. ...more info
  • best Austen novel - so far
    After seeing a number of adaptations, I finally decided to read all of
    Austen's novels. Northanger Abbey was not bad, and Sense and Sensibility
    is excellent. However, this is the best so far. While there is a lot of
    insightful comment on the custom of English society of the time, and
    discussion of the character's motivation, the book just sparkles during
    the interchanges between them. While those between Elizabeth
    and Mr. Darcy are justifiably famous, I would say that many of the others
    are at the same level. My favorite are perhaps the interchanges between
    Lady Catherine and Elizabeth. I am very much looking forward to reading
    the remaining three completed novels....more info
  • Awesome of course
    Never fear this is not a novelization. It's the classic story with a revamped cover. If you are interested in getting the book this is not a bad choice...more info