The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - complete illustrated novel. Published by MobileReference (mobi).
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - complete illustrated novel. Published by MobileReference (mobi).

 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) (often shortened to Huck Finn) by Mark Twain is commonly accounted as one of the first Great American Novels. It is also one of the first major American novels ever written using Local Color Regionalism, or vernacular, told in the first person by the eponymous Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, best friend of Tom Sawyer and hero of three other Mark Twain books.

- Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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A seminal work of American Literature that still commands deep praise and still elicits controversy, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is essential to the understanding of the American soul. The recent discovery of the first half of Twain's manuscript, long thought lost, made front-page news. And this unprecedented edition, which contains for the first time omitted episodes and other variations present in the first half of the handwritten manuscript, as well as facsimile reproductions of thirty manuscript pages, is indispensable to a full understanding of the novel. The changes, deletions, and additions made in the first half of the manuscript indicate that Mark Twain frequently checked his impulse to write an even darker, more confrontational book than the one he finally published.

Customer Reviews:

  • Colorful and darkly funny satire
    Twain's colorful and darkly funny critique of the antebellum American South is no less stinging (and no less controversial) 125 years after it was first published. Its satire of race relations, vigilantism, hypocrisy, and romanticism may remain just as relevant, but it's Huck and Jim's travels down the Mississippi River - the quintessential journey to reinvent oneself - that makes Huck Finn the decisive Great American Novel....more info
  • Everyone should read this
    Wonderful book. Everybody should read it. Mark Twain is a genius. I don't care at what age you read this book whether a child or studying it in college you should read it. Read it for the story line, the literary technique and the deeper meaning....more info
  • Not Bad, Not the best ever either
    This one's for Huckleberry Finn. I first read this is high school and forgot everything about it a month later. A while back I read it again and now my memory is much better. This is about the travels of the boy Huck Finn down or up the Mississippi River with a slave named Jim. Huck had previously escaped from his drunkard father and from "civilized" society as well. The book chronicles their travels and the many adventures that ensue. Mark Twain was a supremely talented writer and uses his skills in an impressive way here. The attention to detail is astonishing and I felt like I was right there with the protagonists every step of the way. There is also a great deal of humor as is to be expected to Twain. And also, there is an uplifting message about the nature of racisim towards the end that could be said to be the cenral theme of the novel. Now that's what was good, so what was bad? Well, Twain goes on and on about boring minutae many times throughout this thing. Two characters named the Duke and King (I think) are introduced and are basically criminals. Almost to a letter they are boring every time mentioned, but I wouldn't call them filler though, I just didn't get into them. They get Huck and Jim into all sorts of trouble and meet their end in time. Other than the long-windedness there isn't much wrong with this novel. Alot of people have said that this is the best ever novel by an American writer, but I don't agree. Oh, one more thing. There is a certain word tossed about quite often here that some people find offensive. I won't mention it here, but most people will be able to guess what it is. Get over it people, It's just the language of the times. I'm someone who could choose to be personally offended by that word in this book but can look past it to see what Twain was doing. If you can't do that then you'll be missing out on the novel's greater message of tolerance and understanding and doing yourself a disservice in the long run. This novel is definitely one of the best ever written and deserves a go by every man woman and child....more info
  • A triumph in its day--less brilliant now
    Let's begin by noting that this is a remarkable work for two reasons. First, it's written in vernacular, from start to finish. This makes the book raw and lively, humorous, and honest. It has a far truer ring to it than a thousand other books from the 19th century. Second, Huck rises above his pro-slavery upbringing and comes to see Jim as a man and a friend.

    Both remarkable features guarantee this novel a place in American lore. However, a good deal of its genius is in working against the sentiments of its age. The racial politics of the day are very different, and thus the novel--like Uncle Tom's Cabin--loses much of its traction.

    With its humor and plain-talk it is superior to almost any American novel from the 18th century. It remains an exceedingly funny novel. Twain is masterful in his depiction of boyhood and the comedies that arise from childish misunderstandings, mischievous shenanigans, and the art of the con. And it is a vital historical document. That will never change.

    I do think the book has some racist and classist moments. Despite Huck's sympathies with Jim, Jim and other Negroes do not come off as terribly intelligent or well-rounded people. In Huck's eyes, Jim is a man worthy of friendship and freedom, but he is woefully na?ve and gullible.

    The lampooning of Blacks and poor Whites takes away from the greatness of this book, even if Twain's political sympathies lay with both groups. And given the changed nature of "race" in the 21st century, some of what made this book brilliant is only recovered with an effort. These are reasons to phase Huck Finn out of the high school cannon. I say this while hoping that college students, and all adult Americans, will continue to read and love Huck Finn for many more centuries. ...more info
  • the adventure of huk finn
    Once in the Mississippi river, a boy named Tom and his slave friend Jim were going down a stream to go to the Free states to get a fresh start. It was summer time and the two boys were running away from the trouble they left behind their old life. The two boys weren't just going to the Free states to get a fresh start, they were going there, because this way Jim could be free and Tom could stay away from his abusive dad. This is the only way that Jim and Tom could find a resolution to their problems.
    My favorite part of this book is when Jim and Tom were going down the Mississippi and they were both asleep and a steam boat ran over their raft causing the boy's to separate from each other for a very long time. This event caused the boy's to be more united and to go through a lot more cool adventures.
    The message that the writer wants to show here is that it is not ok to lie, to face trouble, no mater how bad it is, and to always say the true. The things that I like about this book were that it was really exciting and there were a lot of adventures in the story. But the only thing that I would like to change about this book is that is too much trouble going on, and it makes it really hard to understand. I would recommend every one to read this book because it is really exciting and it paints a picture in your mind making the reading really exciting.

    ...more info
  • A great book telling of society's problems
    Preceding The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, which ends after both Tom and Huck receive a large sum of money after finding a gold stash hidden by robbers. Both take place in the small town of St. Petersburg, Missouri, sometime before the start of the civil war. This helps to set up one of the main conflicts of the book, the issue of slavery. The story is told in the eyes of Huck Finn, who's skeptical view of the world allows him to think for himself what is right and wrong based on his sense of morals rather than jumping on the band wagon and coming out upright disliking slaves and regarding them as property, as much of what the south did during those times.

    After being kidnapped by his biological father, he runs away and hides out on Jackson's Island and meets Jim, a run away slave. Although he has initial doubts on helping a runaway slave, he acts on what he believes to be right and team up. Throughout the story, Huck is tempted many times to turn Jim in for reward, and Twain incorporates these ideas through the characters surrounding Huck, like the con artists he is forced to join together with one time. They eventually sell Jim to Tom's aunt and uncle, and through a misunderstanding they think Huck is Tom and Tom is Sid, Tom's younger brother. Although Huck is initially surprised by the fact that Tom is willing to help Huck rescue Jim, because unlike Huck who was a social misfit, Tom was the product of middle-class society, strictly enforcing to the established rules by society. He acts as the foil for Huck through his strict adherence to rules despite moral issues while Huck acts solely through his own independent way of thinking. When Jim is "free" Huck learns that Jim had been free all along in the will left by the former slave's master. He realizes that was the reason why Tom was willing to help him. From the first book, the reader generally regards Tom as the good guy of the story, but it seems that in this novel, our view of Tom changes. He is willing to cause harm and risk lives for his own selfish motives.

    When all is well and over, Huck begins to see the world more clearly for himself, saying that he does not want to be civilized because it would mean losing his sense of logic and acting on cold and strict rules. He decides to go west, toward Indian territories unbound by these rules where he can decide for what is right and wrong.

    Twain's story is seemingly focused on Huck's "coming of age" with his discovery of the hypocrisy of the otherwise barbaric society. Where they cold-heartedly abide by rules and treat black people, who are also human as pieces of property to be bought and sold at their master's every whim.

    I would advise anyone to read this book because it has such a strong message and it reads well due to all the action in the story. In addition, Twain's use of foils allow the reader to see both sides of the story, albeit a little biased because it was told from Huck's point of view. All in all, it makes for one great book to read!
    ...more info
  • My Favorite American Novel
    This is a pleasure to read. I have listened to it unabridged on tape 3 times and hope to listen to it more. Full of humor and sadness, it is not a book for children as is Tom Sawyer. Huck is an abused youth who narrates an odyssey that he, the runaway son, and Jim, the runaway slave, have on the river. It is unfortunate that films cannot capture the Huck's narrative.

    ...more info
  • Ole Huck
    You'll notice pretty quickly when you pick this up that Huck doesn't spell too good and his grammar isn't so hot either. But if you look a little more closely, you find that he sure knows how to use the semi-colon, and his sentence structure is picture perfect. Mr. Twain may have decided that he was going to have some fun with his charming narrator, but he sure wasn't going to sacrifice good writing to do so.

    The novel, as everyone knows, is a masterpiece, and works splendidly on every level. Plot, character development, theme; everything is here. Anybody reading this review has probably read the book several times and moreover has probably read about it a dozen more so it's pretty certain that my little review is not going to add much. I would, however, like to comment on something which struck me while reading it most recently, which is how richly it evokes middle America of the mid-nineteenth century. In other words, as well as being literature of the first rank, Huckleberry Finn also functions as a thorough and fascinating historical document of a time and place that every year sinks deeper and deeper into our collective memory.

    Here he is describing Uncle Silas' place in Arkansas upon seeing it for the first time. "It was one of these one-horse cotton plantations and they all look alike. A rail fence round a two-acre yard; a stile made out of logs sawed off and up-ended in steps, like barrels of a different length, to climb over the fence with . . . some sickly grass-patches in the big yard, but mostly it was bare and smooth, like an old hat with the nap rubbed off; big double log house for the white folks--hewed logs with the chinks stopped up with mud or mortar, and these mud stripes been white-washed some time or another; round log-kitchen, with a big, broad open but roofed passage joining it to the house . . . hound asleep there in the sun; more hounds asleep round about . . . outside of the fence a garden and a watermelon patch; then the cottonfields begins, and after the fields the woods."

    The first thing that strikes you about this is how . . . impoverished this all is, especially compared to how we live today. And this is a cotton-field owner with a number of slaves! But this was the south: rural, poor, hot, languid. Oh, yes, we are all familiar with the palatial southern mansion from novels like Gone With the Wind; I suspect that most of the South in the 1840s was closer to Huck's description than to Margaret Mitchell's.

    Here's Huck's description of the town in which the King and Duke put on their first show: "The stores and houses was most all old, shackly, dried-up frame concerns that hadn't ever been painted; they was set up three or four feet above ground on stilts, so as to be out of reach of the water when the river was overflowed. The houses had little gardens around them, but they didn't seem to raise hardly anything in them but jimpson-weeds, and sunflowers, and ash-piles, and old curled up boots and shoes, and pieces of bottles, and rags, and played-out tinware . . . There was generly hogs in the garden, and people driving them out." Charming, eh? Of course, we in our modern twenty-first century aren't immune to such slovenliness. Sometimes, historical descriptions remind us that things don't change much.

    Along with his brilliant observations of humanity and the human habitat the novel also contains breathtaking descriptions of nature, especially the Mississippi River. There's heavy timber on the Missouri side, mountains on the Illinois side, the lights of St. Louis: "We run nights, and laid up and hid daytimes; soon as night was most gone we stopped navigating and tied up--nearly always in the dead water under a towhead . . . Next we slid into the water and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool off; then we sat down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee-deep, and watched the daylight come. Not a sound anywhere--perfectly still--just like the whole world was asleep, only sometimes the bullfrogs a cluttering, maybe. The first thing you see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull line--and that was the woods on t'other side." How wonderfully evocative this is; how it makes one ache to experience such things!

    Again, the novel is so much more than this. I'm not going to bother with the theme and the plot and the characters--what else is there to say?--but I can not finish this without giving an example or two of the wonderful humor contained in here. Here's the charming Huck after sneaking into the circus under the tent: "I ain't opposed to spending money on circuses when there ain't no other way, but there ain't no use in wasting it on them." And when the King and the Duke run on hard times: "First they done a lecture on temperance, but they didn't make enough for them both to get drunk on. Then, in another village, they started a dancing-school; but they didn't know no more than how to dance than a kangaroo does, so the first prance they made the general public pranced in and pranced them out of town . . . "

    Oh, how rich this is. Rich and funny and lovely and hilarious. Read it for the pure entertainment contained in here, if nothing else.
    ...more info
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
    Most everything about this book was GOOD!
    This book had many interesting unexpected moments! It had a great blend of mystery, suspense, and surprises. All of the chapters had a great sense of imagery. Mark Twain describes every character with great detail. You can imagine what every character is wearing and what they look like. It is a great fiction book.
    This book takes place out in the Mississippi River where two men from different races are looking for adventure and are traveling for freedom. There is murder, a feud, and a lot of adventure. In the book you are faced with many problems like how will Jim (the slave) get freed, or how will Huck Finn find a way to get away from his alcoholic father.
    This book had my attention ever since I picked it up! This is a good book for young adults because of the outdoor setting and some mature words.
    In the end this book has a great moral and teaches you so much on how to treat others and how you want to be treated. I highly recommend this book for anyone who wants an adventure!

    ...more info
  • A triumph in its day--less brilliant now
    Let's begin by noting that this is a remarkable work for two reasons. First, it's written in vernacular, from start to finish. This makes the book raw and lively, humorous, and honest. It has a far truer ring to it than a thousand other books from the 19th century. Second, Huck rises above his pro-slavery upbringing and comes to see Jim as a man and a friend.

    Both remarkable features guarantee this novel a place in American lore. However, a good deal of its genius is in working against the sentiments of its age. The racial politics of the day are very different, and thus the novel--like Uncle Tom's Cabin--loses much of its traction.

    With its humor and plain-talk it is superior to almost any American novel from the 18th century. It remains an exceedingly funny novel. Twain is masterful in his depiction of boyhood and the comedies that arise from childish misunderstandings, mischievous shenanigans, and the art of the con. And it is a vital historical document. That will never change.

    I do think the book has some racist and classist moments. Despite Huck's sympathies with Jim, Jim and other Negroes do not come off as terribly intelligent or well-rounded people. In Huck's eyes, Jim is a man worthy of friendship and freedom, but he is woefully na?ve and gullible.

    The lampooning of Blacks and poor Whites takes away from the greatness of this book, even if Twain's political sympathies lay with both groups. And given the changed nature of "race" in the 21st century, some of what made this book brilliant is only recovered with an effort. These are reasons to phase Huck Finn out of the high school cannon. I say this while hoping that college students, and all adult Americans, will continue to read and love Huck Finn for many more centuries. ...more info
  • A Mark Twain classic
    "Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot."

    With characteristic humor and self-satire, Mark Twain inserted this warning into the preface of his classic American novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Perhaps he was thumbing his nose at his critics, who often criticized his writing as coarse and unsophisticated. Perhaps he was acknowledging that the book, which contains elements of an adventure story, a hero's journey and a tall tale, defies easy categorization. Using first-person narrative, Twain skillfully employs his command of language and masterful storytelling to explore the idea that true individualism means following one's own conscience, even if that means coming into conflict with society's rules and prejudices.

    I found this story to be an enormously good time as Twain wonderfully describes Huck and his magnificent adventure. Twain brilliantly writes of the innermost thoughts of Huck as he struggles with whether or not to accept and help Jim, a runaway slave. This is a great book that offers more than just a boy traveling down a winding river and what he encounters along the way. Twain satirical writing delivers immense insight into the society of the time. His explores the problems that existed in nineteenth century America (pre-Civil War era) with regard to slavery. Twain's comedic styles allows for a good read while subtly emphasizing the importance of personal understanding and acceptance. Twain threatened to banish anyone seeking a moral in this work, but it seems likely that his compelling themes of individualism and shared humanity contribute to the enduring popularity of this American classic.
    ...more info
  • Eli Sashihara writes:
    Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a timeless classic that lives up to its prestigious name. It takes place in an array of locations along the Mississippi river around the time of 1835-45. The story is about Tom, a free-spirited boy, and his numerous adventures with a run-away slave named Jim.

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn proceeds Mark Twain's original novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, but within the first page Huck acknowledges this and says reading the first book isn't that important. However, I personally recommend reading The Adventures of Tom Sawyer before this book. While it is not essential, it adds a lot to the book and gives an initial understanding Huck's character.

    The book starts right where The Adventures of Tom Sawyer ended: Huck is struggling to fit into his new found "civilized" life with the Widow Douglas. Huck is uncomfortably forced to learn to be proper while his fortune is held for him.

    It wasn't long till Huck's Pap, the village drunk, came to kidnap Huck for his fortune. After living with his abusive father for a while, Huck decides to escape. One night, Huck feigns a robbery on his Pap's cabin and then feigns his own death. Huck escapes to a nearby island and decides to live there. Soon word spreads through town about Huck's death and the town suspects Huck's father, but then suspicions transfer to a runaway slave named Jim who was living on the same island.

    Jim and Huck set off on a raft before people could find them. They embark on a series of adventures, including boarding the ships of robbers, murder mysteries, gunfights, family feuds, great storms, mobs, con artists, and other extravaganzas. During their voyages they also come to deal with a series of topics and realizations, such as the irony and hypocrisy of "civilized" and adult culture, slavery, racism, morality, human nature, and superstition. ...more info
  • It's no Tom Sawyer, but still fine work
    This book, which is more of a companion to "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" than a sequel, has Twain displaying his talents on all fronts. His classic wit shines through as does his knack for expressing deep observations about life through the life and events of a child. This book lacks some of the mystique that Tom Sawyer has and the plot moves more slowly. This is still great reading, however, as Twain's effort here is better than many authors' strongest moments. If you liked Tom Sawyer, you will enjoy this book. If you're curious to try Twain, I would recommend Tom Sawyer before giving this one a try....more info
  • Key passage
    [Think about this part. Consider memorizing it.]

    I felt good and all washed clean of sin for the first time I had ever felt so in my life, and I knowed I could pray now. But I didn't do it straight off, but laid the paper down and set there thinking - thinking how good it was all this happened so, and how near I come to being lost and going to hell. And went on thinking. And got to thinking over our trip down the river; and I see Jim before me, all the time, in the day, and in the nighttime, sometimes moonlight, sometimes storms, and we a floating along, talking, and singing, and laughing. But somehow I couldn't seem to strike no places to harden me against him, but only the other kind. I'd see him standing my watch on top of his'n, stead of calling me, so I could go on sleeping; and see him how glad he was when I come back out of the fog; and when I come to him again in the swamp, up there where the feud was; and such-like times; and would always call me honey, and pet me, and do everything he could think of for me, and how good he always was; and at last I struck the time I saved him by telling the men we had small-pox aboard, and he was so grateful, and said I was the best friend old Jim ever had in the world, and the only one he's got now; and then I happened to look around, and see that paper.

    It was a close place. I took it up, and held it in my hand. I was a trembling, because I'd got to decide, forever, betwixt two things, and I knowed it. I studied a minute, sort of holding my breath, and then says to myself:

    "All right, then, I'll go to hell"- and tore it up. ...more info
  • ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain
    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, originally published in 1884. It is the sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Ernest Hemingway (and many others) called it the greatest American novel ever. Huck Finn picks up right where Tom Sawyer left off - Huck's abusive father appears to lay claim to Huck's fortune, so Huck fakes his own death and goes down the Mississippi River with Jim, the escaped slave.

    Much like Tom Sawyer, there's not a lot of plot going on here most of the time, and that's okay, because Twain's writing is extremely entertaining. Twain has a good old time mocking social conventions, and the novel is gripping almost all the way through. Hemingway was right: the end of Huck Finn is poor. After Jim is abducted and Tom Sawyer reappears, things just get silly, not to mention highly convenient (And Tom Sawyer here is just as immature as he ever was, reinforcing that no real maturation occurred in Tom Sawyer, and that that book really isn't a coming-of-age story in the truest sense).

    Twain has made Huck the narrator. On the whole, this works, although it gets tiresome to read Huck's dialect sometimes. Twain-as-narrator is definitely missed here. Nobody could write a clever sentence like Twain, and most of that is lost here, although occasionally Huck will turn one (and by doing so break character, but that's the price you pay).

    Huck Finn has been exceedingly controversial because of the extensive use of the n-word. So is the novel racist? Certainly the characters have the racism of the day ingrained in them - in that sense, it is racist. But more important to most people is whether Twain was racist; that is, whether he put his own personal racism in the book. That is harder to determine, especially since Twain has made Huck the narrator. Perhaps the fairest thing to say is that Twain was genuinely criticizing racism, but the way in which he portrayed Jim and the other characters contains some residual racism of its own.

    So is Huck Finn America's greatest novel? Well, maybe not. But it's definitely up there.
    ...more info
  • American Classic
    Twain's Huckleberry Finn has derived much controversy from its use of the "n" word in the dialogue as well as what some believe are stereotyped characters within the novel. As some have noted in defense of Twain, Twain's main object was to portray and depict the typical Southern dialect of this time period, and so his use of the word was to mainly show that this was a common expression used. This "overuse" of the word is most obviously an attempt at debunking the idea that people should speak this way. What some forget while reading Huckleberry Finn is that it is a satire aimed at breaking down and making fun of many of the conventions of not only the South, but other aspects of social life. Perhaps the biggest indicator of Twain's intent of facetiousness is in his "Explanatory" and "Notice" in the book's preface, where it is inferred that we are not to take everything so seriously in the book. There are many other things going on in the novel, and it is a shame that often we overlook that a classic like this has so much more going for it.

    For one thing, the novel is as much about growing up and striving to do good as anything else. Huckleberry Finn has this battle throughout the book, and mostly after he meets up with Jim on Jackson's Island and must do some serious soul searching to figure out what is right and what is wrong. An abolitionist wasn't thought of lightly in this setting, and so Huck is not easy to let go of society's laws. However, through much of Jim's guidance, Huck does learn morals and principles of life. Jim represents the father-figure in Huck's life, mainly because Huck's "real" Pap is an alcoholic, abusive, neglectful and mean-spirited to his son. If there ever were a case for a character breaking the stereotype idea, it would be Jim. After all, isn't it Jim who questions what Huck believes about him running away from slavery? When Huck examines ironically to himself is, and will always be, a "no good abolitionist", this admission and growth of character can be chalked up to Jim, who has already influenced Huck by then. Jim helps Huck grow up and be a more thought-provoking character. Huck gains a better picture as the novel progresses; for instance, he comes to understand that the duke and the king are not only frauds, but that they are lower than low because of their greed and callousness to the Wilks family.

    On another level, the novel is a lot about light-hearted fun, satire, poking fun of society and just Huck's imagination. Huck is a child who is not easy to civilize; he wants to be out in the world and living an adventure, being in a band of robbers with Tom Sawyer or adding "style" to a given situation. Huck often lives life by the moment, and has to use his "street smarts" to get out of predicaments, which might mean making up a story, faking his own death, dressing up like a girl to get information or using quick wit to escape a sticky situation. He seeks freedom and adventure, and the Mississippi River, where Jim and he spend much of their time on the raft, is a symbol for this escape.

    Over all, I found this to be a difficult review because Huckleberry Finn is probably one of my favorite books and Twain is one of my favorite authors. But, I think if you read Huckleberry Finn in the right light, it is an amazing read about adventure and growing up. Definitely recommended!
    ...more info
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Bantam Classics)
    I read this book years ago when I was very young, but it still stands today as my alltime favorite. As I turned the pages, I lived that exciting adventure along with Huck and Jim. The language is a bit difficult at first, but you get the hang of it rather quickly. It is recommended reading for all ages. ...more info
  • An adventurous novel, my favorite book!
    Witness Huck's transformation into maturity, through reading this captivating book that preaches independence and loyalty. Huck's dedication to his friend, Jim, is truly touching and serves as an inspiration to all!
    Since the beginning of Huck's journey, Huck is living on his own without real adult supervision for the first time. He escapes from the custody of his abusive and manipulative father, and runs into Jim, who becomes a father figure to Huck later on in the story. Along with this "independence" Huck is forced to make his own decisions, which Huck first derives from the racist thoughts he had learned growing up, which he was having problems applying to his new African American, and escaped slave, friend. As Huck sees the cruelties of the world, where the white race call African Americans "[...]" and when the life of a slave is not valued, he eventually decides that what he was taught as a young child, no longer applied to the circumstances that he now lived in. As a reader, we can read and marvel at the brave adventures that Huck takes on and acknowledge him for his independent thinking!
    Huck's refusal to give up their friendship and trust, and the knowledge and wisdom that Huck gained should be envied by everyone. Therefore, Huck is an inspiration for courageously breaking away from the negative views of society by upholding honor and establishing his individuality. Don't miss out on a book that can change your own outlook on life, learn the positive impact your decisions can make on the world!...more info
  • A True Classic
    I am enjoying reading this classic to my son. I read it years ago. By reading this story to him, I am finding myself excited and ready to take on a new adventure. The price is unbelievable, too....more info
  • Huck Finn Book
    The book is "new", and is the classic that I recall from years ago. Recommended reading!...more info
  • An Adventure
    It has been said that all American literature begins with The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Reading this book for the first time was a delight. Though I was thoroughly familiar with most of the story, I still found the book to be a page turner. The character of Huck, the manchild, has to be one of the most fascinating in all of literature....more info
  • Both a wry observation of 19th century America and a classic adventure tale
    I was introduced to this book back in high-school (in Australia), where my English Literature teach (who was an American) used this as one of our set texts. Despite this, I really enjoyed it, and now, near 20 years later, I picked it up in some second hand book shop for $1.50 and got engrossed in it all over again.

    Mark Twain (not his real name) sailed the Mississippi river as a riverboat pilot early in his career, and the truth of his depiction of people and way of life in this novel shines through, despite the fanciful nature of the adventure. I couldn't help but get caught up in the crazy tale of Huck Finn, hopeless trouble-magnet that he is, as he struggles to get free of his troubles with the less-than-helpful assistance of a large cast of characters.

    The language is a joy to read. The characters are fun to follow. And although the plot isn't the most complex, the characters themselves do a fabulous job of making the simple into convoluted mayhem. Several times I had to laugh out loud at the absurdity.

    Even though I picked this book up cheap, it's well worth hanging onto. I can easily see myself re-reading this again - hopefully before another 20 years pass!...more info
  • The best Book I have ever read
    This is the most entertaining book I have ever read. Numerous times I laughed out loud. "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" has been called the greatest American novel ever written and I don't doubt that it is....more info
  • Tangents

    Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was a great piece of satire, that is, all the parts I understood. This book is incredibly difficult to understand. For those of us that are literary scholars, feel free to purchase and dig away at the complex plot that at times seemed to go absolutely nowhere. Be prepared, because this story is not as fast paced and exciting as Tom Sawyer. Unlike Tom, this is an adult book that wrestles with themes of prejudice and severe elitism that plagued the antebellum south and was Mark Twain's response to the lynchings and other cruel acts committed against African Americans. So while it deals with serious issues concerning Americans even to this day, it contains half the excitement. If you're going to buy this book, devote every iota of your concentration power to it. The seemingly pointless tangents in the plot ultimately come back to enforce Twain's more important themes. The plot focuses on Huck's desire to escape civilization and eventually is accompanied by Jim, the runaway slave accused of murder. Jim has been the subject of intense controversy. I was completely turned off by his representation as a complete idiot who completely depended on his white master. Some may argue that it was in the best interest of the slave to appear ignorant so their masters would never grow suspicious of them. Yet considering that Twain once owned slaves and was a southerner himself, I have my doubts. I guess that's part of the enjoyment provided in the novel; we'll never be completely sure what Twain thought of blacks and social equality. Modern readers beware of the n-word, as it is used quite frequently. But also pay attention to the way Twain criticizes the south's complete support for slavery when in fact it was an institution that hurt the majority of southerners. I recommend the book, but devote a lot of time to it.
    ...more info
  • The Greatest American Novel
    "Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain is the greatest American novel. Because it is our greatest novel it has been reviewed, analyzed, admired and vilified probably more than any book in American literary history.

    Everyone knows the story. Huckleberry Finn is a character introduced in "Tom Sawyer". He's the neglected son of the town drunk. After discovering a small fortune with Tom at the end of Tom Sawyer, Huck is given a home with spinsters. The idea is to `civilize' Huck. That means bathing regularly, going to school, church in order to elevate him above the level of poor white trash.

    (Forgive me for using the term. But author is unsparing in his use of language considered to today to be politically incorrect. We'll discuss this more later.)

    Huck's father's paternal instincts are stimulated by the smell of money. He wants custody of his son. Unfortunately the law is on his side. Huck decides to run away. Inadvertently he takes one of the household slaves with him a runaway named Jim. They ride down the Mississippi River on a raft and sail into the annals of literature.

    The single largest misconception about "Huckleberry Finn" is this is a children's novel. It is often given to children as a gift or taught in junior high English class. Twain was master of American dialects. His characters speak as they should for their time and place. Consequently, the n-word is used extensively. If you're the only black kid in the class, constant use of this word could make things uncomfortable.

    This one of the reasons this book this book keeps winding up on the banned lists. But to put this book on the banned list in the name of political correctness is short-sighted and ignorant.

    Another reason this is not a kids book is it tackles issues and situations far beyond the junior high level. The average 13 year old simply does not have the life experience to fully appreciate the book.

    Huck and Jim represent the dregs of pre-Civil War southern society. All their lives they've been reminded of this. They must always listen to the counsel of their `betters', be it con men, childless old ladies or noble families hunting each other to extinction. Most of their `adventures' are because they yield their better judgment to idiots.

    But there is a notable exception. Jim ran away rather than be sold away from his children forever. He's not as interested in freedom as much as he is in taking care of his family. Huck is conflicted because he's stealing an old woman's property. However he begins to see this `property' as a human being.

    The point where Huck decides he will go to hell before he returns Jim to an uncertain future is one of the greatest moments in the history of American letters.

    Huck and Jim may not be the smartest people in the world. But they both show presence of mind, loyalty, devotion and love in abundance.

    In short, they represent the best of humanity.


    ...more info
  • Was Twain Off His Mark?
    I first read this when I was about the fictional Huck's age. Rereading it after nearly 50 years was especially enjoyable. Numerous incidentals and turns of phrase came flooding back, yet major portions were lost to memory. This has to do with my particular literary appreciation of course, but it may also reflect on the author's construction. My memory was strong for the first half, but after Tom came on the scene it was as though I were reading it for the first time. Ernest Hemingway remarked that the book should end where Jim is betrayed and returned to slavery. That would have made the novel more a tragedy and a truer picture of 1830s America.

    Somehow, I cannot enjoy Tom Sawyer's machinations and contrivances to romanticize Jim's escape. I appreciate Twain's satiric style, but it went on far past my point of tolerance. Tom Sawyer is exposed not only as a twaddle-headed romantic, but as an arrogant little cockalorum, eager to toy with regular folks for his own amusement. Had I been Mark's editor, I would have urged him to abbreviate Huck and Jim's association with the King and Duke and especially shorten Tom's influence at the end. Some would say I am making too much of this. The Tomfoolery is there to allow Mr. Twain to display his unique spoofing. I get it. But why allow the brave and noble Tom to be shown as such an overweening brat?...more info
  • Perfect for Teachers
    I have heard about many of the essays included in this text and was excited to find that I could get them all in one book. I love the footnotes for additional information and the fact that the essays include both sides to teaching this book. I highly recommend for anyone who needs to know more about this classic text....more info
  • Legendary
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: classic. I really enjoyed this book. Mark Twain managed to keep the boyish atmosphere of the Adventures of Tom Sawyer while adding in adult like concepts, such as decisive moral choice and honor, to create a work of fiction that many hail to be the "Great American Novel."

    If you're not familiar with the story: Huck, after having found riches with Tom Sawyer, is living with the Widow Douglas and no longer leading a life of vagrancy. I won't go too deeply into the story because: a) there are a lot of plot elements and it would be impossible and b) it really is something that you have to experience through the eyes and in the language of Huck Finn (the entire story is written from his perspective and in his dialect as opposed to the Adventures of Tom Sawyer, which was written in Twain's distinct voice). Notable plot elements: Huck's escape from Pap, Jim and Huck's travel down the Mississippi, the Duke and the Dauphin and the Royal Nonesuch, and Huck and Tom's (who is present at the end of the book) contrivance to "free" Jim (you'll understand the "quotations" after you read the book).

    Overall, all the hype surrounding this book is well deserved. Anyone who can read the English language should read this book (it should be a requirement punishable by death). You won't be disappointed....more info
  • Huckleberry Finn
    This book accurately depicts the lifestyle and thoughts and feelings of Americans during the time slavery was legal. This book incorporates many concepts from other books such as Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet when the Grangerfords and Sheperdsons feuded against each other over a marriage. I recommend this book....more info
  • A great American classic
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is one of those novels that could easily go either way in the minds of a reader. Some people find it either boring or offensive, particularly because of its excessive use of the "n word." Others balk at the unbelievability of the plot premises (such as carrying an escaped slave south rather than north). Still others find the excessively colloquial linguistic style distracting and difficult to read. Any or all of the above could cause a person to dislike this story.

    I myself certainly noticed the shortcomings above (although I personally enjoyed the colloquial language and realized that the use of the "n word" was historically accurate and would have been used much as we today say "black" or "African-American"). However, I was able to largely overlook the problems of the novel and appreciate it on a more simple level: an adventure-filled journey down the river.

    In addition, I appreciated the central device of Huck's character: he acts consistently against his conscience, which is representative of the deplorable attitudes that were prevalent at the time. Through his actions, we see that he is not truly racist, but that society has imposed racism upon him. We see that he is impressionable, and will allow bad things to happen for a while, but ultimately he will step in and try to stop them. In this way, he is representative of the "innocent" child, whose worse qualities are always a result of others around him rather than anything innate.

    Overall, this book is worth reading as a parable on freedom and conscience, and deserves a place among the great American classics....more info
  • ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain
    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, originally published in 1884. It is the sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Ernest Hemingway (and many others) called it the greatest American novel ever. Huck Finn picks up right where Tom Sawyer left off - Huck's abusive father appears to lay claim to Huck's fortune, so Huck fakes his own death and goes down the Mississippi River with Jim, the escaped slave.

    Much like Tom Sawyer, there's not a lot of plot going on here most of the time, and that's okay, because Twain's writing is extremely entertaining. Twain has a good old time mocking social conventions, and the novel is gripping almost all the way through. Hemingway was right: the end of Huck Finn is poor. After Jim is abducted and Tom Sawyer reappears, things just get silly, not to mention highly convenient (And Tom Sawyer here is just as immature as he ever was, reinforcing that no real maturation occurred in Tom Sawyer, and that that book really isn't a coming-of-age story in the truest sense).

    Twain has made Huck the narrator. On the whole, this works, although it gets tiresome to read Huck's dialect sometimes. Twain-as-narrator is definitely missed here. Nobody could write a clever sentence like Twain, and most of that is lost here, although occasionally Huck will turn one (and by doing so break character, but that's the price you pay).

    Huck Finn has been exceedingly controversial because of the extensive use of the n-word. So is the novel racist? Certainly the characters have the racism of the day ingrained in them - in that sense, it is racist. But more important to most people is whether Twain was racist; that is, whether he put his own personal racism in the book. That is harder to determine, especially since Twain has made Huck the narrator. Perhaps the fairest thing to say is that Twain was genuinely criticizing racism, but the way in which he portrayed Jim and the other characters contains some residual racism of its own.

    So is Huck Finn America's greatest novel? Well, maybe not. But it's definitely up there.
    ...more info
  • Twain: From Great to Just Good
    "Ambivalence" is the word that comes to mind when discussing this, Twain's supposed masterpiece, and the term that also comes to mind when considering the state of race relations among the leading thinkers in our nation during most of its history. Twain published "Huckleberry Finn" past the halfway point in this time line, and it stands as a fascinating monument to how even "enlightened" leaders viewed the race question at the cusp of the 20th Century.

    Twain's work continues to be heralded for its descriptive prose and rendering of river life, for its spot-on use of dialect and its clever plot and dialogue; but in the end, all that matters is the author's treatment of the race question.

    Like Huck, Twain began life in a lower-middle class, slaveowning family, and like Huck, the author slowly grew less tolerant of overt racism. That sort of almost grudging transformation is on full display in this epic work, and for most of it, we take our own grudging, yet sympathetic view of Huck and Twain. After all, we ask, would it be fair to judge 19th Century morality through the prism of 21st Century democracy?

    That laissez-faire approach by the reader comes to a crashing halt, however, when we realize that we have been led "down the river" by Twain through his boyhood alter ego, Tom Sawyer, who - like so many of his time (and even like some of us today) - find a million rationales as to why the black man must undergo additional inconvenience to suit the white man's whims. Tom is the 19th Century Everyman who finds every excuse in the book not to release Jim until he is forced to admit publicly that this former piece of property has already been set free legally. And so, for the final one-fifth of the book, we are made to watch Jim surrender to Tom and Huck's nonsensical games, thwarting what had been the almost inexorable progression of a moralistic plot line, and disappointing this reader to no end.

    In twisting what a vast majority of readers expect and are waiting for, Samuel Clemens may be making clear what he felt about some of the tougher, racially-tinged exchanges in his book. Those passages could have been construed as the author's surreptitious way of commenting on the racism of his time, but that argument begins to collapse as the moral imperative of Twain's plot crumbles.

    In the end, no amount of adoration for Twain's wonderful caricatures of bumpkins and hoboes or for passing moments of hilarity can compensate for the disappointing conclusion to this "beloved" book. Like Jefferson, who said all men are created equal but who, unlike Washington, simply could not bring himself to free his slaves, Twain paints a narrative of gradualism - ultimately, not through Huck Finn, but through his majoritarian stand-in, Tom Sawyer - and Twain seems content with it.

    A major bonus of this 2001 Modern Library Classics edition is the thought-provoking introductory essay by George Saunders of Syracuse University and the collection of shorter, back-of-the-book commentaries, which in their own way clearly demonstrate the slow evolution of race relations in our country.

    It is ironic, and indeed somewhat fitting, that the cover testimonial for this edition comes from H.L. Mencken, who hails "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" as "One of the great masterpieces of the world." As someone who derided the "booboisie" and evidenced a streak of intolerance in his own public utterances, perhaps the choice of this particular endorsement is more fitting than one might realize.

    Read this work by Twain as a compelling historical record first - and if you can stand to, as an "entertainment" second. ...more info
  • Well it made me a happy boy
    I was down in the dumps I was. Wonderin' when my Huck Finn would come, and wonderin' if it would be righ' on time. But it was, I tell you, it was. ...more info
  • A great book teaching some of our most valuable morals
    In Twain's most prized novel, he reveals the problems in a judgmental, racist society and shows the need for reform. He argues for an end to such acts throughout the novel with Huck's union with the runaway slave and his ultimate decision to leave such a tainted world for more free ground.


    Throughout Huck's travels, he struggles with the decision of whether or not he should stay loyal to his most precious and dedicated friend or turn him in just because he is a runaway slave, revealing the problems with judging people based on their skin color alone. In the beginning of the book, before Huck runs away to be alone, he would talk to Jim, Miss Watson's slave and property, on occasion, playing tricks on him with the help of his friends. But once he is able to escape society and discover the runaway Jim along his path, he decides to protect him and they band together in their journey. Although Huck repeatedly refers to him as "my Jim," he sees him as more than property but more in the sense of him being his friend. It is only when Huck is able to abandon all the "ideals" that society had taught him that he accepts Jim as his friend, not at all associated with any means of property. He decides this one night, even willing to go to "hell" for his actions, showing how he achieves Twain's goal of ending the extensive judgment in society based on a man's outward appearances.


    As Huck learns more related lessons, he notices many problems that society has and decides that he does not want any part in such actions, abandoning those who do not share his views and becoming the full embodiment of Twain's wishes. Once Huck has decided that he will not dispose of Jim and return him to the hands of his owner he decides that he must break Jim out of "jail." He finds himself once more reunited with Tom and shares his goals, amazed at the fact they Tom is willing to free a runaway slave. He thinks that Tom has changed to share his views, but is once again let down by those who were once close to him. It turns out that Tom only agrees to do this after he learns that Jim is already free. He would not have agreed to help Huck otherwise because he still believes in the fact that slaves are property. When Huck discovers this and Jim is set free as he should always have been, he no longer wishes to live in a place where people are considered property and others do not keep their promises or base their acts on faulty premises. He then decides to leave for the Indian territories--a place where he can act as he knows is right and how things in the world should be. ...more info
  • My favorite book
    It's hard to write a review of your favorite book. It's hard to describe in words the wonderful hours I spent reading and rereading it. No other book has captured the joy of being a kid so well, and the adventures that the world has to offer. Through excitement and peril to lazy days spent on Huck's raft, this book absorbs you from start to finish.

    The plot is superb and extremely well-written. Twain writes with a remarkable feel for dialog and description. This knowingness probably stems from the fact that the story is partly inspired by Twain's own boyhood. He himself lived along the Great River, and he knew all of its sights and sounds.

    The characters are extremely well-crafted. I could always relate to Huck, who seems to represent boyhood personified. His wish for greater adventures, for fun - for the easy life - was something that enthralled me when I was young. I, too, wished to have a raft, to be floating down the Mississippi River with Huck.

    However, this remarkable book is not so much an adventure story as it is a critique of the society of that time. Many not-so-childish issues are addressed, such as the evil of slavery.

    The story is filled with adventure: Huck runs away from his abusive father, finds a canoe and sails to an island, where he finds a runaway slave named Jim. Together, they sail through the Mississippi River while danger hounds our protagonists every step of the way. There are twists and turns, but be assured that all will be fine in the end.

    What I believe makes this book great is how Twain is able to make the reader feel as though he is with Huck. The story, told from Huck's perspective, complete with bad grammar, etc. is so convincing that you almost forget that Huck himself didn't write the book. A remarkable achievement in American literature.

    The Dover Thrift Edition is cheap and unabridged, and I highly recommend it. There are, however, no pictures, but in a book as good as "Huck Finn", it seems as though one sentence is worth a thousand pictures!...more info
  • Key passage
    [Think about this part. Consider memorizing it.]

    I felt good and all washed clean of sin for the first time I had ever felt so in my life, and I knowed I could pray now. But I didn't do it straight off, but laid the paper down and set there thinking - thinking how good it was all this happened so, and how near I come to being lost and going to hell. And went on thinking. And got to thinking over our trip down the river; and I see Jim before me, all the time, in the day, and in the nighttime, sometimes moonlight, sometimes storms, and we a floating along, talking, and singing, and laughing. But somehow I couldn't seem to strike no places to harden me against him, but only the other kind. I'd see him standing my watch on top of his'n, stead of calling me, so I could go on sleeping; and see him how glad he was when I come back out of the fog; and when I come to him again in the swamp, up there where the feud was; and such-like times; and would always call me honey, and pet me, and do everything he could think of for me, and how good he always was; and at last I struck the time I saved him by telling the men we had small-pox aboard, and he was so grateful, and said I was the best friend old Jim ever had in the world, and the only one he's got now; and then I happened to look around, and see that paper.

    It was a close place. I took it up, and held it in my hand. I was a trembling, because I'd got to decide, forever, betwixt two things, and I knowed it. I studied a minute, sort of holding my breath, and then says to myself:

    "All right, then, I'll go to hell"- and tore it up. ...more info
  • The Adventures of Huckelberry Finn
    Again, I am never disappointed in purchasing books from you because they are always superior to buying local. Thanks for your service you provide to your customers....more info
  • Huck Finn
    What I appreciate most from this book is its ability to create rollercoaster sensation, in which the reader participates aside with the characters within the novel. The life seems unimagineable but it's that very reason that makes it memorable.
    Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn explores the human flaws of an American society through the eyes of Huck Finn, who ultimately triumphs over societal expectations; Twain argues that in order for one to genuinely perceive flaws of a body of people, one has to be truly detached and thus objective of that group. Huck Finn is the epitome of an intrepid individual, who ignores societal expectations, when he learns that it is not he that is abnormal, but the others that are unusual. It is not until then that he truly assumes an objective stance and investigates and analyzes the slave-oriented society. Able to prevail against the initial despairs of isolation, Huck Finn ultimately overcomes through his eventual apathy towards the people's views. He does exactly what the others do not expect him to do so. Instead of diminishing, Finn firmly stands even stronger than before, an attitude that irate the rest. It is then that the individual truly undermines the established norm and understands societal flaws. Following one's moral compass, anyone can rise against and unjust conformity, upholding one's genuine beliefs.
    The reason you should read this book is that it becomes good source, as it is cited and referred to in allusions....more info
  • An Entertaining Flight in American Literature
    How can one critically review what is arguably the greatest American novel? Very carefully! Twain, who briefly served the Confederacy was a river boat pilot, miner, reporter, lecturer, acerbic wit, devoted family man, was the premier writer of 19th century America.

    In "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" Twain thoughtfully and compassionately weaved a tapestry of mid-stream American life and culture which probably did more to positively change white America's view of its black minority than any legislation ever could. He achieved all that while creating a timeless world of youthful adventure to where countless generations can escape.

    This wonderful volume is a replica edition that contains almost 200 original illustrations by E. W. Kemble, which conveys the raw excitement of life on the Mississippi. It should be given as a present along with "The Complete Tom Saywer," so the reader can have access to the the entire mythos that Twain recorded....more info
  • Genius Work but Difficult to Teach
    The temptation to teach Huck to high school students must be taken seriously. No matter the racial makeup of the class, the "N" word has to be defused before reading begins. We can explain and discuss and meltdown some of the ascerbity of the word, but unless the issue is fully resolved, the 200-plus appearances of such a slander will eventually work us back to tender. Background reading on Twain is a must. His short story, "Disgraceful Persecution of a Boy," about a boy returning from Sunday School who stops to stone a Chinaman (in San Francisco) makes a pointed comment about the "teaching" of prejudice. This story makes good pre-reading since a reference with a similar point is made in "Huck Finn." When a river boat has an accident, a riverside discussion goes: "Was anybody hurt?" "Nope. Killed a N- though." This bit of dialog slipped in and overheard is painfully offensive and yet such a perfect contrast to Huck's feelings and the "teaching" he has received, both from the Widow Douglas and from life itself. Jim, of course, is the subject of Huck's racial feelings. Throughout the story, Jim is a father, brother and friend to Huck, but never a servant. He is everything, a good man tormented with love for his lost family and Huck, yet in his world, he is literally bound (by chains and threats) and so cannot come close to the dignity of African Americans of today. Huck and Jim's world requires that we board a mental time-machine and accept both the life on the raft and the values on shore as they were then, not now. Teach the book with joy after preparing with compassion....more info
  • YOU CANT RUN AWAY FROM TROUBLES.
    "You can't run away from trouble. There ain't no place that far." Uncle Remus

    Huck and Jim take to the river to escape their troubles, but trouble dogs them every foot of the way. In fact, both Jim & Huck were within days of liberation when they eloped. They literally escaped from freedom.

    The slavery and such are interesting sideshows, but Twain makes it pretty clear Jim wasnt mistreated, and freedom was always across the river, north & east, if Jim wanted physical freedom. Freedom was NOT down the river in the heart of the Deep South. All of this is metaphor for running away from your troubles.
    ...more info
  • Learn to hate Twain while driving
    Let's face it, the novel is flawed. At best Twain is commenting on race poorly; at best he's blind to his own racism. Want to judge for yourself, you can read it again or give it a listen here--it's the complete text. ...more info
  • Old classic
    We have a classroom set of an old favorite. This was for the student who would have trouble reading on his on or for the class to listen to certain parts of the book read to them....more info
  • A humorous reflection of our flaws
    A vivid story of wit, growth, and adventure is provided in Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The experience of reading this novel has proved equally exciting to the plot, inducing fear, anger, and happiness as I yearned to find out the next encounter of Huck and Jim. Through a mix of satire, irony, and subtle humor, Mark Twain voices his condemnations of the faults of society: its prejudice, discrimination, and racism. This is especially expressed in his exaltation of Jim the fugitive, revealing that one's qualities are shown through their actions, not a pre-existing judgment of physical properties. The strength of friendship and individuality is also greatly emphasized in this novel. I have learned from Huck's experience that respect and freedom is not gained by following the rules, but rather gained by reaching beyond what is expected. As "uncivil" and "savage" as Huck is considered, his purity and morality outshines the rest, illustrating him as the true protagonist. The flaws of society in Huck's time are just the same as our times: a drive of ambition and greed, selfishness, and cowardice in humanity. The average man follows his peers to gain acceptance, for without acceptance, one fears their capability to function. This dependence has made us fearful and suspicious of one another, trusting no one but ourselves. A true friend discovered is a priceless jewel - a needle found in the roaring sea. They will wait for us, accept us, and most of all, converse and trust us regardless of our flaws or looks. Huck is just as we are, but successful in finding true direction and acceptance. ...more info
  • Required Reading
    This was a required reading for my son's class at school. Although he enjoyed the story line, the use of the local slang (written out phonetically ) was difficult for him to read and distracting to the story, he felt....more info

 

 
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