Jane Eyre - Illustrated novel by Charlotte Bronte. Published by MobileReference (mobi).

 
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Jane Eyre is an 1847 novel by Charlotte Bronte, published by Smith, Elder & Company, London. It is one of the most famous of British novels. Charlotte Bronte first published the book as Jane Eyre: An Autobiography under the pseudonym Currer Bell. The novel was an immediate critical and popular success. Especially effusive in his praises was William Makepeace Thackeray, to whom Charlotte Bronte dedicated the novel's second edition, which was illustrated by F. H. Townsend.

Jane Eyre is a first-person narrative of the title character, a small, plain-faced, intelligent, and passionate English orphan girl. The plot follows the form of a Bildungsroman, a novel that tells the story of a child's maturation and focuses on the emotions and experiences that lead to her maturity.

- Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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Customer Reviews:

  • Worth the time!
    This book is wonderful! The beginning is a very slow read, but it picks up and is totally absorbing once you get a third through it. Once you've read it, the beginning is never dull, as many people say. Once you know the story, you'll enjoy the begininng to the full!...more info
  • A CLASSIC with a capital "C"
    This CLASSIC with a capital "C" deserves every excellent review it has. I can't add anything that hasn't been said. So, I will give Bront? fans a couple of website links in Haworth where the Bront? sisters wrote. The parsonage (where the family lived, father was a parson) has been turned into a museum filled with Bront? artifacts, their little dresses (the sisters were under five feet tall), letters, and books.

    I don't know if AMAZON will allow me to include website links in this review. If the links are removed you can look them up on your own.

    Haworth is in West Yorkshire. It is approximately one hour from the Manchester airport. Website: www.haworth-village.org.uk

    The Bront? Family Parsonage Website: www.bronte.org.uk
    ...more info
  • "Destiny"
    There are many excellent books written about the human heart, but few writers master the artistry needed to combine both thought and dialog into a free flowing story that, filled with mystery and torment, capture the imagination as does Charlotte Bronte's tale of love and desire struggling upstream against the elements of life station, society's pressure, and mistakes made in youth that never lie in peace no matter how much time passes.

    Such is the novel Jane Eyre. I knew it was a Classic, and acknowledged it; I had seen several versions of the movies made of it, but did not recall having ever read the book as an adult. Written in 1847, it seemed something to watch on film, but not explore in the written word, as many such novels are difficult to read. Nothing could have been farther from the truth, and I was given an extraordinary literary experience once again by chance. It is particularly interesting given that this book was written by a woman at a time when license was thin; she managed not only to pull it off, but gave up nothing in the process while taking the reader to the smoldering destiny of what she intended to deliver.

    Jane Eyre is a hauntingly beautiful tale of a plain but highly mature and intelligent girl, shunned and unwanted by her family in her youth, much like the fairy tale of Cinderella. The reason for this travesty is finally delivered in the epilogue, yet it's integral importance yields completely to the unlikely romance that she finds as a result of it.

    She, frightened and alone but possessed of a courage and confidence that she will somehow prevail against her odds, is arranged a position as a governess for a mysterious, often absent gentleman of means who needs a tutor for his little girl. Upon arriving, she immediately senses there is a sinister intrigue surrounding the big house and it's inhabitants, but is too conscious of her place to be too inquisitive; beyond that, her sense of honor and integrity prevents any covert investigation on her part. But it is a place to flee from on occasion, and one night she leaves to send a letter out in the next town, which is a long walk through a dusky, cold winter's evening. There, on a lonely bridle path, she unwittingly meets the owner of the Estate, Edward Rochester - as he returns homeward, although in no glamorous way to be sure, as he has fallen off his horse and sprained his leg, all within her immediate vision. She come to his aid, helps him to his feet; and the first of the fateful encounters between a world-weary yet vital man and a much younger, guileless, yet very capable woman has come to be.

    The author waxes splendid in her descriptive paragraphs of the countryside and surroundings; of the morning mist shrouding the walks under the cherry trees in the old gardens surrounding the mansion; of moonlight shining in windows at night adding visuals as if by magic. But that's the periphery; the undercurrent of something else is running dark and deep. There is a secret hidden on the upper story, one that is closely guarded, yet threatens to expose itself continually, with the potential to destroy not only Mr. Rochester himself, but any chance for happiness he may decide to take.


    Rochester senses something out of the ordinary in the governess he has inherited by chance to educate and care for his child. The flighty little girl is the irritating and very tangible link to his past that brings him continual reminders of his "error" - yet has somehow been the vessel that brings about his emotional emancipation - through the hiring of Jane. And as Jane becomes acquainted with her benefactor, she realizes that despite his eccentricities, he is above other men in many, many ways, for even in her protected environment she has noticed his encouragement of equality for her; encouragement to speak her mind and reveal her thoughts to him. She is reluctant to do so, because she is wary of the differences in station between them, and realizes he has ultimate and enduring power over her. He cleverly attempts to seek out and determine ahead of time each of his moves toward his desires so that he may emerge to the next level unscathed.

    The idea flow is exquisite; articulate without a misstep anywhere in connecting her intricate plot with the characters and the moments that filter unerringly down to create the mood and the sensuality between the two unlikely lovers that are caught up in the vortex. The night the Gypsy arrives unbidden to the big house is a perfect example.The scene Jane endures with the "gypsy" in the parlor is truly one of a kind; I don't believe I have ever read anything quite it's equal for astonishing originality. The depth of emotional insight, passion, and fear of rejection and/or discovery is intensely woven into this particular part of the story in an unforgettable exchange of dialog and mental dueling; a subtle, ingenious breaking of barriers, of discovery without risk.

    Turn charlotte Bronte loose with word software on a computer with the literary license of today and one can't help but wonder just what form it would have taken. For certain though, it could not have been more masterfully written than was the "original."



    ...more info
  • A Must-Read Classic
    It is a true classic of British literature. Charlotte Bronte paints a great story with very interesting characters. Even though some would say that is is boring to read all that detailed descriptions, long internal monologues, and difficult to understand dialogues, I have to say that these are the best part of the book. The dialogues are sparkling with humor and wit.It is very entertaining to read.The author follows the development of the characters throughout the story and offers many pedagogical and psychological theories concerning the human nature and its evolution.
    It is one of the best books I have read from this period and about this period. It beautifully describes the time the story took place. Next on my reading list are more stories by Bronte. I found one of the favorite classical authors. ...more info
  • Jane Eyre hardback edition
    The book is beautiful and all that I had hoped to receive. It is a wonderful addition to my classic book collection. Thank you. ...more info
  • illustrated ebook
    Jane Eyre - Illustrated novel by Charlotte Bronte

    This ebook is a golden treasure to add to your library. A beloved classic and remarkable work of literature....more info
  • A guaranteed good read
    For all you out there who aren't very big fans of classical literature, I assure you that this book will not disappoint. This is a beautiful love story that isn't too hard to understand as far as classic books go, and is well worth the effort. ...more info
  • Jane Eyre
    This is a beautiful love story about not so beautiful people. Which makes it even better. I really think it's one of the best books around in this genre. Some of the lines are priceless and the interaction between the two main characters is charming and yet painful at the same time. It's young love at it's very best. Bittersweet and oh so good....more info
  • Jane Eyre Audio CD
    It is really nice for traveling to "read" as you go, also it was nice for a busy daughter who had to read it for HS assignment!
    ...more info
  • Touching
    Jane Eyre / 0-451-52655-4

    Unlike many of the classics, which contain a superb message under vernacular that is sometimes hard for us to read, Jane Eyre still flows easily to our ears and eyes, and the plot is gripping and suspenseful.

    While Jane may seem, to our modern sensibilities, to be something of a weak heroine in her jealousy of her master's suitor, her insistence upon actual marriage in spite of the cruelty of the situtation, and her weak acceptance of her missionary suitor's almost vampiric leaching of her spirit (in spite of his own sisters' exhortations to stand up for herself, no less!), Jane is still a strong and modern female in light of the standards of her own day. Her bravery in taking up her post as governess in a strange land, her 'presumptuousness' in courting (or being courted) by her master, her daring in considering to be a missionary's wife, and her final decision to set out again in search of her lost love all point to a strength of will and character which would have made her character - at the time - to be quite 'mannish' indeed! We can admire Jane her strength and will, while marvelling happily at how far things have come, and wonder hopefully at how much farther they may yet go....more info
  • None Like It
    I consider 'Jane Eyre' to be one of the greatest works of art ever achieved. Certainly better than almost any other work of literature and on a par with Michelangelo's 'David' and Beethoven's Fifth Symphony....more info
  • Best Book in the World!
    Jane Eyre is my favorite book. I love it.
    I read it first when I was 10, but it did not appeal to me at all, so I stopped reading it. I tried a year later. It immediately became my favorite book. I have read many other good books too, like Rebecca, but Jane Eyre is #1! I have recommended it to all my friends who love reading. This book is very great for someone my age (12) who is not bored with descriptive writing. (I've read worse.)
    You should definitely try this book! ...more info
  • buy this edition
    If you're thinking of reading Jane Eyre, and you want to understand it, this edition is the one for you. The footnotes are very helpful, explaining the allusions to the Bible or older literature that you might not pick up on, as well as some of the vocabulary. The contemporary reviews in the back are great - everyone must read Elizabeth Rigby's review. Our culture has changed so much, we don't understand how revolutionary books like Jane Eyre once were. The essays of modern criticism are also very helpful. Someone did a very good job with this book.

    A few reviewers wrote that Jane Eyre is not entertaining or something. Actually, it is if you understand it. To me, Jane Eyre is up there with Shakespeare, the Great Gatsby, Catcher in the Rye as some of the deepest, most well thought-out stories I know of. It is a book to read 2 or 3 times before you draw your conclusion.

    So - in short - read Jane Eyre, and use the Norton Critical Edition.
    ...more info
  • Better than I expected
    This novel was quite a bit better than I expected. I usually prefer adventures ("manly" literature) but quite frankly, this book didn't disappoint me. I don't give it 5 stars for the convoluted way that Jane and Rochester get back together. The "I heard your voice in the wind" stuff is a little hard to swallow. (Sorry if that was a spoiler! Still read the book because there are some true heart-pounding moments!) Jane Eyre was actually quite enjoyable to read and I'm glad that I took the time to read it. I like her character: She's not beautiful, but she's a solid and determined woman and I like that her inner beauty overcomes her physical plainness. She's a role model for young girls! She overcomes adversity with strength and determination and has an accurate moral compass. She follows her inner voice and she's rewarded for it. Great female literary character of the 19th century!...more info
  • Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre" is a beloved novel of a governess's life and love
    Jane Eyre was authored by the inimitable Charlotte Bronte of the Yorkshire writing Brontes of Haworth Parsonage. The novel was written under the pen name "Currer Bell" in fears that it might be thought to have been by a woman. Bronte dedicated the book to one of her literary heroes William Makepeace Thackery whom she met on a London trip. Little did Charotte know that Thackery had to deal with a wife gone mad as had Rochester in her novel!
    Jane Eyre suffers through a miserable childhood. She is raised by a cruel aunt Mrs. Reed after the death of her parents. Jane is sent to the odious Lowood Academy where she lives for eight years from age 10 to 18.
    At Lowood, Janes befriends the older girl Helen Burns. Helen dies at an early age; Jane remains at Lowood. Miss Eyre eventually becomes a teacher at the school as she has learned French, sewing and social skills.
    Jane departs Lowood to become the governess of Adele the illegitimate daughter of Mr. Rochester. Rochester is a Byronic figure who has a madwife named Blanche living in the third story of his estate Thornfield. Jane leaves Rochester at the wedding altar when it is discovered he has a living wife. Jane flees to a home of evangelic Christians where she is courted by the future missonary Mr. St.
    John. He rejects the wealthy Rosamund Oliver for Jane. Jane, however, loves Rochester. In a dramatic ending the little Miss Eyre is reunited with her lover and weds Rochester. Jane comforts Rochester who has become blind and maimed due to the burning down of Thornfield. The fire had been set by his mad wife Blanche who leaped off the roof of the building. Daphne Du Maurier would use a similar ending of her novel "Rebecca."
    The name "Jane Eyre" can be interpreted in many ways. Jane was the middle name of Charlotte's sister Emily. Eyre may refer to her desire to fly freely in the independent air of personal freedom. Eyre also hints at the fact that Jane is an heiress. Jane also "errs" in some of her decisions as she makes her pilgrim's progress through northern England. The book is a Cinderella story in which a poor and plain young woman wins her lover. The dialogue is sharp, witty and the scene is populated by interesting rural servants and domestic animals such as the dog Pilot.
    The book contains elements of Gothic terror, romance and a defense of the rights of women. Bronte is often taught in courses on Feminism. Charlotte Bronte writing in the first person uses a rich language drawing on Biblical, Classical and Shakespearean language and metaphor. Bronte knew how to tell a good story for her life was similar to that of Jane Eyre. Bronte saw many of her sibling die young and lived in genteel poverty as a governess and teacher.
    Jane Eyre is an immortal classic which will continue to be read and enjoyed by future generations. It is the kind of book which will hook you on reading. Excellent and deserving of several rereadings. The Penguin edition has a large section of notes explaining Victorian customs and the literary allusions....more info
  • a timeless story
    In our current culture filled with technical language, slang, and gross misuse of the English language, Jane Eyre is a refreshing and brilliant view into 19th century England and pure unadultered English. It is a scintillating story told from a feminist perspective at the time, yet it is completely applicable to the 21st century. It should be required reading for all women, young and old, urban and rural, single and married. A delightful read. ...more info
  • Beyond Lit: A Compelling Read
    Or: The Book Is Better Than The Movies. Liberate "Jane Eyre" from the stigma of the English Lit syllabus! This book is still fresh and accessible, its language easily readable, and its heroine's feelings and motives instantly recognizable. I enjoy "Jane Eyre" more every time I read it, and not because the book "gets better" --- as I grow and change and as my perspectives shift, I see things in this book that I missed before. Forget that you're "supposed" to like it. Read "Jane Eyre" for pleasure, and find your own rewards....more info
  • A triumphant classic
    Jane Eyre is the story of a young girl who grows up and is forever contrary to her society. The book foreshadows the penalties that society gives for such opposition, but Jane still remains opposed to the role society wants her to have. In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte uses foreshadowing, symbolism, and conflict to show her society how a woman can overcome the conventions of her society to live a happy and full life.
    An example of foreshadowing comes during Jane's engagement. First there is the splitting of the chestnut tree (page 226), soon after Rochester and Jane become engaged: "Before I left my bed in the morning, little Adele came running in to tell me that the great horse-chestnut at the bottom of the orchard had been struck by lightning in the night, and half of it split away." This event foreshadows how the upcoming wedding between Jane and Rochester will divide the two, sending one away, because they are not ready for marriage. It is not until Jane and Rochester both overcome the conventions of their society that they can have a happy marriage.
    The most dramatic example of foreshadowing comes right after Jane's dreams. After waking from her disturbing dreams, Jane sees a light in her room and finds a grotesque female figure standing over her (250). The figure is Bertha Mason, who came to terrify Jane out of marriage. After rending Jane's veil in two, Bertha leaves and Jane collapses. The rending of the veil foreshadows the obstacle still in front of Jane's upcoming marriage, and it is not until this obstacle is dealt with that Jane can marry.
    Aside from foreshadowing, Charlotte Bronte uses symbolism, mostly of birds, to show how Jane's society confines her. For example, Jane's surname comes from the word for a bird's nest, aerie. Rochester gives an additional example of the bird symbolism on page 232 when he says "Jane, be still, don't struggle so, like a wild frantic bird that is rending its own plumage in its desperation." Rochester says this when he is trying to convince Jane that they can be married. At this time Jane is struggling with the barriers that her society places on their union. Jane is the bird that society traps in a cage, keeping her away from the man she wants to marry. Eventually, Jane does find a way to overcome her cage and obtain happiness with Rochester.
    Bronte also uses people to symbolize certain aspects of her society. Mr. Brocklehurst, for example, is the epitome of hypocrisy, as shown during his inspection of Lowood. While surveying the girls in the school, Mr. Brocklehurst condemns one for having naturally curly hair, a vanity of the world in his opinion, and yet Brocklehurst goes so far as to buy curled wigs for his wife and daughters. In addition to this, Brocklehurst manages the funds of Lowood and never allocates enough money to keep the girls sufficiently warm or well fed. Instead of teaching the girls to live pious and frugal lives, he leaves them weakened in front of the onslaught of winter illnesses. These characteristics of Mr. Brocklehurst make him a symbol of the typical man from Jane's society. Jane's ability to overcome the wrongs he does to her shows her society how to rise above society and obtain a happy life.
    Throughout this book, Jane clashes with the conventions of her society until she rises above them. The greatest example of Jane's opposition to her society is in her successful marriage to Rochester. "Reader, I married him," Jane says on page 397. Jane does not say that they were married, or that Rochester proposed to her again. Instead, she states that she took the active role and married Rochester. Such assertion from a woman went against the standard role of women in Bronte's time. Jane opposes the role that society has established for her and rises above it, obtaining the thing that truly made her happy.
    Charlotte Bronte focuses on overcoming the conventions of her society by having Jane Eyre oppose and surmount them. Foreshadowing shows how society will react to such opposition, such as when Jane and Rochester are initially engaged. Symbolism also helps to illustrate the confines of convention; they cage Jane just like a bird. And the various clashes between Jane and other characters, even her society, further illustrated the limitations of conventionality. But opposing and overcoming the conventionality of society can lead to true and lasting happiness.

    ...more info
  • "I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will." - Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre
    Charlotte Bronte's Gothic romance novel which was written over 170 years ago, in 1847, is deservingly a classic of English literature. "Jane Eyre" has been one of my most beloved books since I was an 11-years-old girl and the friend of mine gave it to me with the words, "This book is amazing" and so it was. I have read it dozens of times and I am still not tired of it. Its language is beautiful - refined, fragrant, and surprisingly fresh. The dialogs and descriptions are memorable and visual. Above all, the novel introduces us to two main characters, a young orphan- pale, thin, "almost un-earthy" but determined, strong-willed, kind and reasonable Jane and Mr. Edward Rochester - sardonic, powerful, passionate, and tormented master of Thornfield. The story of their impossible love has attracted millions of readers not only in the English speaking countries but all over the world. "Jane Eyre" has been adapted to TV and big screen 18 times. The actors as famous and marvelous as Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles, William Hurt and Charlotte Gainsbourg, George C. Scott and Susannah York, Ciar¨¢n Hinds and Samantha Morton, Timothy Dalton and Zelah Clarke, have played the couple that had to overcome hundreds of obstacles made by society, laws, religion, by the differences in age, backgrounds, experiences, and by the fateful mistakes that would hunt one for many years.
    ...more info
  • Beautifully Written
    This was my first Classic novel. While it was not fast-paced and begging to be read, it was a beautifully written novel. It was very lyrical. I thought the love between Jane and Mr. Rochester was true, withstanding the test of time. It was a truly romantic book, but not so easy to read because of the time period in which it was written. For instance, this is not a novel I would read in bed at night because I would fall asleep. Still, having said that, I am happy I read it and thought Charlotte Bronte was an exceptional novelist....more info
  • The Model for the Modern Historical Romance
    It seems silly to say that a book can affect you on a profound level. well I definitely believe in this power that a good book has. Jane Eyre is one of them. I cannot say that this was an easy book to read. But it was a book that I was very enriched by reading. Romance is a genre that is looked down on by many "sophisticated readers." Perhaps they would look down on Jane Eyre, but would probably get some eyebrows raised at them. Well Jane Eyre is the archetype for the romance novel. After having read thousands of them, I know a romance novel when I see it, and Jane Eyre does qualify. But it is much more than this. It's a story for the person who wonders why the keep trying to do the right thing, and persevering in life, instead of just taking what they want when they want it. If Jane Eyre had been that sort of person, she would not have gotten her happy ending. Instead, Jane walked away from the thing she wanted most in the world. She almost died doing what she felt in her heart was right. Had the story ended there, I probably would have detested this book. But it doesn't. We see Jane continue to grow and act as the phenomenal person that she was. Although often downtrodden, she is no meek mouse. She has a fighting spirit that keeps her going when others would have laid down and died. But despite being a fighter, she is not a user and abuser. It's hard at times for the difference to be clearly delineated. Well there is no question about Jane's level of strength and intregrity. Although it is made clear several times in this novel, that Jane is no beauty, her soul makes her a beautiful character. Beautiful in a more profound way.

    There are moments when you feel, how can one person suffer so? But taking the journey, you realize that all Jane's suffering had a purpose. It refined her into a woman who could look beneath and love what others could never love or understand. It made her the woman who could love and heal Rochester.

    At the same time, Rochester was made for Jane Eyre. He had searched his life for a woman like her, and made quite a few mistakes along the way. And out of love, he was able to let her go when he wanted to keep her. But she came back to him, when he needed her most.

    Rochester is the hero that formed the archetype for many of my favorites: tortured, scarred, dark, enigmatic, all of those things. Best of all, loving little, plain, ordinary Jane with a fundamental intensity that pours out of the pages of this book into my heart as a reader. Despite his lack of perfection, I could not love him more.

    Ah, how maudlin I sound. I can't help it. This book moved me to tears. Yet I smiled at the same time. I enjoyed the conversations between Rochester and Jane. There was a heat there, a passion. Yet this book is clean enough to read in Sunday school. That is grand romance. The journey so well expressed, that no sex scenes are needed. It's all there.

    This novel is also inspirational. Not preachy, in my opinion, but for a believer, one can definitely find spiritual messages in this book. About perseverance, about not wearying about doing good. About the profoundness of God's love. It's all there, but in a narrative that expertly showcases it, not preaching it.

    I feel I am failing to write the review I want to write for this book. The words do fail me. All I can say is that this book will always be a favorite of mine because of the way it touched my heart and challenged me.
    ...more info
  • A Visit With the Past
    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte was our book club selection for this month. It is a book I had not read since I was in high school. Now I can't believe that at one time I plowed my way though the extravagant prose, it must have been because the selection of other romance books was limited.
    Our edition was large print, for which I was thankful and as a recommendation I'd suggest a condensed version.
    Writing style have changed since 1848, but one item of interest. Early in the book Miss Bronte describe the characteristics of the development of a serial killer as graphically as any modern thriller.
    Nash Black whose titles are available in Amazon Kindale editions.HaintsSins of the FathersWriting as a Small Business...more info
  • A timeless Gothic masterpiece.
    Some modern readers may find it hard to believe that this little Gothic novel created quite the scandal in its day. The novel is based on an orphan by the name of Jane Eyre, who is raised by her aunt, the cold-hearted and cruel Mrs Reed. Jane's early childhood is one marked by violence and neglect. Early on, however, the readers learn that little Jane Eyre has a fiery spirit that refuses to become a victim of its oppressive enviroment. She boldly lashes out at those who mean to demean her and constantly remind of her station in life.

    When Jane fondest wish comes true, she leaves behind her wretched existence at Gateshead House and arrives at Lowood school. Jane's life at the orphan boarding school proves just as trying as her time at Gateshead. Behind the walls of Lowood, Jane suffers many privations and witnesses many acts of cruelty. She remains at Loowood for eight years, first as a pupil then as a teacher. Jane's urgent need for change prompts her to seek a position as a governess. She finds such a position at Thornfield Hall, the home of Edward Rochester, who the narrator falls deeply in love with.

    The character of Jane Eyre is extremely modern. Readers today will have little problem identifying with her thoughts and wishes. Although of low social standing, Jane speaks her mind to those who mean to subdue her. She reminds her aunt of her promise to look after her when she abuses her as a child. She defies the teachers at Lowood. She refuses to become Mr Rochester's mistress. Jane choses her own happiness over what is expected of her, not a very attractive quality in women in Victorian society, but one modern readers can sympathize with

    Charlotte Bronte used several personal life experiences as inspiration for this novel. Like Jane, Charlotte attended a boarding school, where she experienced many of the tribulations Jane suffered. The death of Helen Burns at Lowood from tuberculosis was inspired by the death of her sisters Elizabeth and Maria, at The Clergy Daughter's School from the same disease. Jane Eyre is one of the best classics. It's dark and tragic, yet emotional and even amusing at times. Definitely one of my favorites. ...more info
  • It's not Austen or Emily Bronte, that's for sure.
    I guess I compared this book to Austen's Mansfield Park. The climax of the book happens too early. I was bored with most of the book, as it does not keep you entertained with clever dialog like Austen. It does not grip you as Wuthering Heights grips you and takes you in from the beginning.

    It is a great story, told with a boring type of writing style at times. I was bored with about the first third of the book. Only when she meets the master of the house and his odd personality does it become interesting. Gothic story telling at it's best, with a shocking climax.

    This is not my favorite Bronte book, nor my favorite Charlotte Bronte book. It is just plain boring in narrative at times. The overall story is a good one and that plain or ugly people fall in love and they are not all beautiful. That in the end, her lover pays a high price for what he's done and she is forgiving of him.

    It's a great ending and a great story, if you can get through a third of the book to enjoy the rest. It's too wordy to keep you on edge like Wuthering Heights, by her sister Emily. The hero of the book is not realistic to what men are really like. It's woman's version of what women would like a man to be.
    ...more info
  • My All Time Favorite!
    This is the book that hooked me on reading! It has everything that I enjoy reading about: strong female characters, mysterious and preternatural occurrences, secret romances, and indelible love. ...more info
  • It is Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • this is what a romance should be...
    Anyone who has read Jane Eyre will be more than ready to assert that there is more to this novel than just a protracted love story. There's the issue of class boundaries, marriage, faith and religious zealotry, self-realization, the circumstance of women in Victorian times, and so on. But being a self-confessed simpering romantic, I have no choice but to focus on my favorite theme.

    I loved Jane most whenever she's in the company of Mr Rochester, or even when she's just thinking about him. Somehow, for me, she becomes quite fervent, feels more human and behaves more womanly. Plus, I loved the fact that the author fully expressed in words the love that Mr Rochester himself feels for our eccentric heroine--so passionate, in fact, that I think some readers may gag at the "syrupy-ness" of his avowals. Not for me though. In fact, I feel a sort of regret that such emotion from a male character is rarely encountered in romance novels nowadays.

    Though a bit rough for me to begin with, Jane Eyre, as both the novel and the woman, became engaging as the story progressed. Dark, emotional, often dialectic, at times drily humorous, this story is sure to be remembered for a long while....more info
  • "Jane Eyre" deserves its standing as a classic in English literature
    "Jane Eyre" is one of the world's best-loved classic novels for so many reasons.

    It's an exciting piece of feminist literature written at a time when feminist literature was little known and even more poorly accepted. That it is a semi-autobiographical novel written by a staunchly, independent female author who herself was struggling to survive by her own wits and means and stand on her own two feet makes the story all the more poignant and compelling. While it is a prime example of Gothic romance peppered with the typical fixtures of a Gothic novel - the spectral Thornfield manor that seems to attain a life of its own; the allusions to mythological characters such as ghosts and vampires; the uncanny timing of such weather phenomenon as lightning or a chilling, drenching downpour to accompany major events in the novel - it also breaks new ground in that it avoids some of the typical conventions of Victorian literature. And, finally, it is a piece of masterful story-telling built around larger than life characters that for over 150 years has enchanted readers of all ages and thrilled watchers of numerous television and movie adaptations.

    For those few of you that have yet to read this wonderful novel, the story can be summarized quickly enough. A dying father extracts a death bed promise from his sister to raise his infant daughter, Jane Eyre. The sister, a spiteful and mean spirited woman grows to hate the obligation that Jane represents and soon sends her away to a boarding school. (Did anyone else have flashbacks to Charles Dickens' Nicholas Nickleby when they were reading this portion of the novel?) In spite of the harsh mental and physical cruelty she endures at the hands of the school's administrator and its teachers, Jane survives to become a teacher at the school. Ultimately she leaves to seek her own way in the world and secures a position as governess in the household of Edward Fairfax Rochester.

    At this point, most readers will correctly guess that Jane and Mr Rochester fall in love with each other but to tell more of the story would be to spoil the effect of this magnificent novel for first time readers.

    Suffice it to say that Charlotte Bront? has woven an enthralling story into the exploration of a multiplicity of themes that will occupy students of the English language novel for decades to come - the interplay of self-respect, morality, conventional mores and religion; the effects of social standing and class discrimination; gender relations in a patriarchal staunchly male-dominated society; legal issues of the day that related to marriage, inheritance and ownership; contrasting extremes of religious zealotry as displayed by Brocklehurst's hypocritical Puritanism reflected against St John Rivers' obsessive but well-intentioned determination to spread Calvinist dogma as a missionary abroad.

    While many of these issues have clearly been relegated to the history of the 19th century, it's also a fact that much of the controversy that Bront? has so eloquently built into her characters' lives persist as issues into our own 21st century. Little wonder that "Jane Eyre" has such enduring power in the world of English literature!

    Highly recommended.

    Paul Weiss...more info
  • I am Jane Eyre sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • pain?
    if i had to say anything about jane it would be that she seems to revel in pain. the injustic of her childhood caused it i suppose or, perhaps, she was always that way. was rodchesters wife crazy before she was locked up? or did locking her up make her that way? well, jane seems to like to be in pain and rodchester seems to like to cause it, they make a happy pair. it was a dark book with a happy ever after, as happily ever after as a dark book can be.
    the book was interesting, clear and well written though something of a slow read....more info
  • I am Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • I am Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • It's Jane Eyre, sir

    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • STILL HOLDS UP BEAUTIFULLY...
    ...after 160+ years.

    THE STORY:

    I read Jane Eyre every 3-4 years because its truly the grading curve for so many writers of the genre. There are times even now when I read the book and I'll say to myself, "I LOVE this book!"

    When you think of the date in which it was written in and the author's limited worldly experience and resources, you can't help but appreciate her sharp wit and thoughtful insight into each character. In addition to that, Bront? has a way of transporting you into Thornfield's dark eerie halls alongside Jane. It's truly a remarkable story!

    THE BARNES AND NOBLES CLASSICS EDITION:

    As for this particular edition, for quite some time I had been encouraging a friend to read Jane Eyre. The compact size was perfect for her to carry around in her bag for long grocery store lines, commuter rides, etc. She finished all 608 pages in one day because she loved it! It also has a great introduction filled with historical and bibliographical information on Ms. Bront? to truly transport the reader into the mind and time of Jane Eyre.

    **If you simply want more Mr. Rochester and Jane after reading this, I suggest seeing the 1983 Timothy Dalton/Zelah Clarke made for TV version by the BBC. Out of all versions (and I've seen all) it is the TRUEST adaptation of Bronte's work and doesn't dumb down her beautiful prose (what the author is most famous for) with modern day slang, nor does it take liberties with Bronte's Mr. Rochester and Jane Eyre to bring them down to Hollywood's standards. The strong characters you fell in love with while reading her book, are the same strong characters in this wonderful screen adaptation. Bronte would be proud as was this reader/viewer. ...more info
  • It is Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • Great for anyone who's ever been in love...
    Simply Stated: This is a story about the importance of not committing your life to love (to marriage) until you know who you really are. In order for you to have a successful, truly successful (by which I mean happy, rewarding, ever-growing, intellectually and emotionally stimulating) marriage, you have to be able to clearly identify and assert what matters to you: who you are, what you want and need in order to be fulfilled on both a daiy and on a lifelong basis.

    Figuring that out may mean leaving someone you love (as it does for Jane), or hurting someone who loves you (as Jane must do), but the only way to return to the 'right' relationship (or to find the right relationship) certain you won't 'lose yourself' in it (lose your mind, lose your direction, lose your hope), you must first strike out on your own and endure (with your own strength, determination, and defiance) some hardships. You must try on some alternative lives (so you won't wonder about them later, won't sit at your kitchen table saying to yourself, "what if", won't bemoan the choice you've made when the going gets rough), and wear them around for a while, like so many shoes in a shoeshop. Sometimes, it takes walking around in heels for a while before you can really enjoy being barefoot. And it takes being barefoot for a while before you can truly appreciate that versatile, enduring and practical comfort of your tennis shoes.

    The bottom line is, this is not just a message for women, or about women. It's about people. People in love. And while the book is pretty old, and the language is sometimes alarmingly eloquent, and the character's day-to-day lives involve horses not cars, and talking not internet, the message in it (and the way it's conveyed) is still highly relevent, highly accessible, and highly enjoyable...and I highly recommend it....more info
  • I LOVE classic romance, but not this!
    I enjoy classic Victorian era romance , and this by far is the worst book I have ever read. I know that Jane's character was suppose to be "Plain Jane", but I in no way found her endearing. Instead of feeling sorry for all her misfortunes and lack of love, I found myself detesting her character. The plot drags on forever, when really it could be told better in five minutes. It could be romantic, except that the plot is so boring and outlandish, that it overshadows that element. And the supernatural elements of the novel literally made me laugh out loud. I could go on about why I hate this novel, but I don't want to ruin the story for others....more info
  • I could not put this book down!
    I bought this book about 10 years ago, and I did not read it till last year, i could not put this book down, This book is so relevant to a woman's heart, to the human being's gemotions, What I love about Jane Is that she always kept fighting through all her trials and never let hate poison her heart, always made the best of everything. I bought the miniseries from BBC, I recommend Pride and prejudice and sense and sensibility by Jane Austen to those who love this genre.Nobody writes this way anymore!...more info
  • One of the Greatest Books in all of English Literature!!
    Jane Eyre is one of my favorite books! It is not at all like other great novels -- it is great in it's own way. I was introduced to Jane Eyre by my best friend. I had read the adapted version first, and then my best friend gave me the unadapted Jane Eyre for a birthday present.

    The book is about Jane Eyre, and the story is told "by her". Jane is orphaned, and her father's brother (Uncle Reed) takes her into his house, "Gateshead". Jane's uncle dies, and her mean and cruel Aunt Reed keeps Jane only because of a promise Aunt Reed had made to her husband while he was on his deathbed. Aunt Reed treats Jane lower than a servant. Jane's aunt eventually sends her to Lowood Institution, a charity school for girls. At the school, Mr. Brocklehurst, a so-called "good Christian clergyman", skimps on food and clothing, and lots of girls fall sick with Typhus because of it. Jane's best friend, Helen Burns, gets Consumption and dies from the loathsome disease.

    Jane is at Lowood Institution for eight years -- two of which are spent as a teacher. Jane soon leaves the school and goes to be a governess at "Thornfield Hall" to Adele Varens, a little French girl. Adele is sweet-tempered and is a bit spoiled. Jane meets the master of the house, Mr. Edward Rochester, but she can't figue out why he is so cold and distant. After being there for a bit, Jane realizes that she is falling in love with him. Jane tells herself that it is absurd, her a mere governess and him so rich and fine a man. Lady Ingram, a rich high-society girl who speaks French fluently and has grace and manners, plus great beauty, seems to be Mr. Rochester's true love.

    But there is a mystery in "Thornfield Hall" -- sometimes there is an unearthly laugh that rings through the mansion -- a demonic laugh. It belongs to a lunatic, a person that acts like an animal, and her name is Bertha Mason. Jane believes it comes from a strange servant, Grace Poole. One night, Mr. Rochester's curtains are set aflame in the middle of the night, and when Mr. Richard Mason comes to visit, he is bit and stabbed in the night.

    Mr. Rochester tells Jane of his love for her, and Jane accepts him after finding out that he flirted with Lady Ingram only to make her jealous. Just when Jane is standing at the altar, ready to pledge her life to Mr. Rochester, Jane finds out that he is married, his wife is the one to whom the demonic laugh belongs. Jane is faced with the hardest decision that she will ever have to make -- stay and be Mr. Rochester's mistress, or leave "Thornfield Hall". Jane leaves.

    Jane finds herself in a place she doesn't know, nearly starving to death.
    She stumbles across a nice house, and the kind people take her in. Mr. St. John Rivers and his sisters, Diana and Mary, and a housekeeper named Hannah reside at "Moor House". Jane then goes to teach at a nearby school, where she learns that she and St. John and his sisters are cousins! Jane, though happy with her cousins, misses Mr. Rochester immensly. One night......
    (Read the book and you will find out what happens! :-)

    Jane Eyre is a wondeful story -- filled with romance, mystery, friendship, kindness and love. The author, Charlotte Bronte, wrote it in five months. Charlotte Bronte once said to a critic, "To you I am neither man nor woman. I come before you as an author only. It is the sole standard by which you have a right to judge me -- the sole ground on which I accept your judgement."
    If you have not read this book yet, I encourage you to do so. I hope that my review has been helpful to you. - P. Charles

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  • Great book!
    Recieved this book along with another book and 2 cds. Shipped really fast..Excellent book..a classic for all ages....more info
  • Jane Eyre The Classic Collection
    The Audio was great until I reached disk 14. This disk would not play, no matter what I tried. Very disappointing....more info
  • It's a classic for a reason
    I'm amused to have been asked to review this by Amazon.com. The book is a classic, and a rip-roaring good read. This version also has a good introduction and helpful endnotes. And I like the cover....more info
  • Gothic and Brilliant
    There is a reason this book has remained popular over the last 160 years. One, it is a fantastic novel written by a woman in the Victorian Era and two, it is on the surface, a romance. However, as the story unfolds, one comes to see the novel for what it really is: a Gothic ghost story. I recommend this book to everyone from age 7 to 70. A must read.

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  • This Particular Version
    I will leave the telling of Jane Eyre to some of the other reviewers. This particular version is my favorite. This is the cloth bound version or the book with the lovely attached ribbon bookmark. This is a very lovely version of this book....more info
  • An unconventional heroine
    In many ways, `Jane Eyre' can be seen as an autobiographical novel. Certainly, Charlotte Bronte drew on her experiences as both pupil and teacher in shaping the character of Jane Eyre. The story of Jane Eyre is a triumph of character and spirit over circumstance. Jane herself is depicted as small and plain and with an independent spirit. She believes, fundamentally, in equality and, absolutely, in the healing power of love.

    The story can be read on a number of different levels: as a triumph of `good' over `evil'; as a claim of a woman's independence; and as a love story. I have read it three different times over the past 40 years and have formed different impressions each time. Perhaps on a fourth read I may form another impression altogether different.

    `Jane Eyre' is a wonderful mixture of the conventional and the unconventional. Jane is a survivor who uses her strength of character to survive the adversities which form part of her life. Many of the views expressed through the characters had critics arguing about the relative morality of the work. Some of those debates would be viewed with astonishment through our late 20th and early 21st century eyes but in the context of the 19th century it was not accepted that women could be the equal of men.

    Charlotte Bronte wrote `Jane Eyre' in 1846, and it was accepted for publication in 1847. Charlotte outlived her younger sisters Emily and Anne and had a number of other novels published: each of her novels is worth reading.

    Jennifer Cameron-Smith
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