Person Pitch

 
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Customer Reviews:

  • tight
    This cd is very tight. I really like how they play off what sounds to me like audio feedback loops, which essentially creates a new kind of music. Makes me wonder how they did it with out creating chaos...more info
  • Panda Bear V. The ghost of Robert Palmer
    Panda Bear:This administration has got some nerve--
    Robert Palmer: You're lights are on but you're not home.
    Panda Bear:Hey who said that I was about to lay into my analysis of this country's impending cultural decay.
    Robert Palmer: You see the signs but you can't read.
    Panda Bear: Oh how lame, you're singing in key.
    Robert Palmer:You know you're gonna have to face it your addicted to love.
    Panda Bear: You call that artfully obtuse, you sound like my dad imitating Bryan Ferry.
    (Robert Palmer takes the form of a panther and lunges at Panda Bear)...more info
  • Not for me.
    Let me first say that I have a lot of respect for this guy. I can see that a lot of people love his music, and he does have some truly unique and neat music, but I guess this album's not for me. I'm not finding the beauty, which is pretty disappointing for me. I'll give it another shot another day, but I'm really not liking this too much. Something about his sound doesn't appeal to me.
    Again, I do have tons of respect for this artist, as Animal Collective are brilliant, but this just isn't for me....more info
  • Person Pitch - Panda Bear
    This album is great. I recommend this if you are a fan of Animal Collective definitely. The music makes you think of sunny days at the park....more info
  • Panda Bear- Person Pitch
    This album is awesome. If you like Animal Collective, the Beach Boys, or indie music in general you will love it. This album is unique and complex enough for the intricate listener, and fun and pleasant enough for the mainstream listener. I recommend it highly....more info
  • Person Pitch
    Panda Bear's Person Pitch is proof positive why it's necessary for Animal Collective to remain a "collective" rather than a permanent band: the members just have too many ideas. Granted, they leapfrogged from style to style on each of their albums anyway, but Animal Collective drummer Panda Bear's latest sounds like the work of one man making music on his own terms, and reflects his own current state of mind. See, Panda Bear (Noah Lennox) just moved to ultra-laid-back Lisbon, and sure enough, Person Pitch sounds like the Beach Boys' California love filtered through a strange exoticism that's easy to associate with a place like Portugal. It retains Animal Collective's ebullient, idealistic attitude, but it's more low-key and atmospheric: quiet drum machines and plinked instruments awash in a psychedelic cloud. And, as you would expect from an animal in the Collective, the vocals are treated in wonderfully creative ways; the fact that Panda Bear sounds uncannily like Brian Wilson is just a really big bonus....more info
  • Stoners beware
    If you smoke this cd will make u zone out like your in a different galaxy....more info
  • COPYCAT AGENDA
    If you like this music, then you'll certainly like the band 'Russian Futurist', which is where I believe "Noah" aka "Panda Bear" got either his inspiration from, or maybe copied from... Both bands sound almost identical.. Regardless, Panda Bear sounds very good and has that daydream music appeal... ...more info
  • One of the best albums of the 2000s thus far
    After thoroughly listening through Person Pitch, Noah Lennox's third solo album, several times, three things ultimately struck me most.

    The first was how quickly this album seemed to pass by. On the first listen, I passively lent it my ears while doing other busy work. I knew I liked what I heard, but it seemed to have ended after fifteen minutes. After looking through the tracklist, I realized that over forty five minutes had passed in actuality. And on many listens since then, I have also felt similarly, even though I have been paying very close attention to the music, that it seems like it must go by in under a half hour.

    I can attribute this strange phenomenon to a number of factors, the first of which is Panda Bear's wide use of sampling and repetition throughout the album. When I saw Animal Collective live at Pitchfork, I found it quite interesting that the show was really just shy of a laptop show; all three members of the band were at one point in front of a soundboard, the Geologist actually for the entire show. Avey Tare was actually quite versatile, sometimes on a guitar or drums. Panda Bear spent most of the show in front of his soundboard, but picked up on percussion a couple times.

    What is interesting about Panda Bear's behavior as an electronic artist, and I firmly believe he can be considered some type of electronic artist now, is that he actually doesn't sample more than a little bit throughout the album. But when he does, he combines his sample choices with concocted or found sounds, and he never lets the album be completely electronic or completely organic. He builds up layers of sound much like Animal Collective did on Strawberry Jam, although somewhat less violent here, and then places them carefully over his rhythms. Many of his loops end in dissonant or floaty chords, thus making them that much more versatile and fluid. What many of them reminded me of before anything else was the album Pygmalion by Slowdive, and its accompanying demo sessions. It is only marginally likely that Panda Bear was ever actually influenced by this album, but judging by his use of these floaty vocal loops and many of the subtle melodies buried beneath the surfaces of many songs, it sure wouldn't surprise me. In any case, all of these elements come together to make a rhythmic result that begs for the listener to do two things at once, relax and listen. In this sense, time is not a concern. Panda Bear does what he needs to do, and lets the songs end on their own. Sometimes it takes twelve minutes, and sometimes four. Perhaps the juxtaposition of long songs next to shorter songs has something to do with my loss of sense of time while listening to this album.

    The second thing that surprised me was how accurately the album cover depicts the sound of the album. I can think of several other albums that have done such just as effectively, but none of those other album covers were quite as complex as the one for Person Pitch, making it that much more impressive.

    The meat of the album are the layers of sound built in each song. Sounds are built upon each other, sometimes used for one time, several bars, or the rest of the song. The samples and effects come from all different directions, parts of life. Some may sound like the sound of water in a bubble bath, while others may sound like animals, the clattering of chains, the sound that Pop Rocks make in your mouth, fireworks going off, doorbells, and whatever else Panda Bear has found or created. The effects, however, are treated with so much watery reverberation that deciphering them becomes difficult. I can liken this to the experience of seeing Animal Collective live, and not really being able to tell what was going on in the music simply because it was so thick, loud, and confusing. This may have been somewhat of a flaw live, but it sure made the music sound that much more awe inspiring, and on record it isn't a problem. However, I do find myself unable to pick out what I am hearing much of the time while listening to this album. It begs to be turned up, because you can never really hear exactly what is happening. After you turn it up, you still can't really make sense of things, but this is an album that grows in power exponentially with volume simply because for every notch on your knob you turn, you are that much more submerged in the music and what is going on.

    Lastly, I have been simply amazed at how happy it makes me to listen to the album.

    People seem to have forgotten to harmonize their voices with one another. They are getting better with it lately (See Fleet Foxes pretty swell release this year that has been lapped up by the hipster crowd this year, with very good vocal harmonies. Actually, they played on the same stage as Animal Collective at Pitchfork.), but still, people forget that vocal harmonies sell. Panda Bear isn't the freaking Mamas and Papas, but he harmonizes with himself in lovely ways that we don't hear often enough. And his smooth, playful vocals are really what make this album the pop gem it is.

    Lyrically, Panda Bear has the guts to sing about things that actually matter. And at that, values that his audience might actually need to hear. And the main theme of the album is so basic, so fundamental that most everyone, including myself, have glazed over it in our minds a long time ago. Be yourself. Don't let anyone else tell you what is cool, what you should listen to, or make you feel inferior. Good Girl/Carrots seems to be the most prevalent in this philosophy. After the whimsical and fun run of "Good Girl," the next movement "Carrots," after a heartwarming reference to Mitch Hedberg, rouses a widespread defense against the kind of people who try to tell you what to listen to, to make you cling to a scene. The kinds of people that try to make themselves feel superior by collecting "all those first editions." Possibly the most affecting line is an indirect put down against "those mags and websites who try to shape your style," like perhaps Pitchforkmedia.com, or better yet, this website right here. The best and most representative line, however, is sandwiched in the middle of this song; "All I need to know, I knew so early." These are the kind of lyrics that we heard when we were small children on TV. Why doesn't anyone sing about these issues anymore?

    But what really makes this album special is that it doesn't falter even once. All of these elements come together to make a collection of seven lovely, moving songs that keep their momentum. The opening Comfy In Nautica sounds like a glorious call over a cliff to some canyon. Then, Take Pills' two separate movements end up being as wonderful as one another, the first a slow relaxing piece, and then a marching, so-catchy-it-should-be-illegal second piece. And then of course comes the main song on the album, the sprawling Bros, for which my praise cannot be effectively articulated into written word. The almost tropical sounding aural cascades of I'm Not act as the keystone of the album. Good Girl/Carrots comes after it, and is just as moving as Bros. In the final stretch of the album, we have possibly the two most digestible and overall lovely pieces on the album, the ambient sound collage Search For Delicious, and a tiny, quite moving lullaby type song, Ponytail, which addresses the difficulties and wonders associated with change.

    I think this is the one album of 2007 that I feel I can be unnecessarily enthusiastic about. It really is that good. Saying it is important or groundbreaking might be a little premature. But what seems to be the trend in pop music lately is either going toward the extremes of wildly experimental or almost ridiculously palatable. Sometimes we get people hitting pots and pans in complex polyrhythms, and sometimes we get The Jonas Brothers. Pop music has become a hedgemaze, and people seem to think that they need to base their decisions on which way to go according to how much is going to sell. Panda Bear, it seems, doesn't really care. He was just taking a walk, and he stumbled upon the beautiful garden in the center. If any album could introduce free form and experimentalism into the world of glorious catchy pop music, Person Pitch is that album....more info
  • apparently, i need more patience, or at least some better weed.
    there are a lot of hyped up bands out there right now (2008) making this kind of record. yeasayer, caribou, animal collective, grizzly bear, just to name a few. i'm trying to think of who started this current sub-genre of indie but can't place it -- probably animal collective -- this guys other group.

    it's not like the early 90's where bands like pavement, sebadoh and gbv made lo-fi records because that's the only studio or 4-track they could afford. these bands are purposefully going for a certain low-fi asthetic. it's noise, for noise sake. think the beach boys filtered through enough eq's to make everything sound tiny and trebly. i'm not saying it's not original, i'm not even saying that sometimes it actually works, cuz it does.. sometimes. but man, over the course of an entire album? it's just so boring. and then to get 10 more bands doing the exact same thing? and can they pull it off live? i dunno, i've never seen them in concert but i kind of doubt it.

    if you like tinny sounding music that meanders aimlessly (and forever) without any real hooks or discernible lyrics, then this is for you. as for me, i'm still looking for bands that make music without any overtly obvious touchstones -- i.e. early r.e.m, the smiths, pavement, the pixies, early modest mouse, hell maybe even some jesus lizard? yup, still no one out there that sounds like the jesus lizard.

    i'll give an extra star just cuz this guy home recorded this with some loop program which must have been a b*tch. now please go make something that doesn't sound like your other group....more info
  • almost spiritual.......
    An album of this standing, if ever, rarely comes along. Animal Collective's Noah Lennox furthers his alter role as Panda Bear and boy are we ever glad he did. Call it experimental, far-outlandish or even psychedelic if you will. The sheer truth is that "Person Pitch" is genius. Intoxicating and optimistic, it's almost spiritual! Maybe Portugal had some something to do with (Noah now resides in Libson, Portugal with his wife and daughter) who knows? What we do know is that the album is full of subtle surprises that reveal themselves with every listen; typical of Animal Collective, I know. But "Person Pitch" is truly in a class of it's own. Simply put, this is one of the most beautiful, personal, special, good-spirited, healthy, invigorating, enchanting, exhilarating, carefully crafted albums of all time.

    ...more info
  • Amazing
    If you have heard this cd, you really need to check it out on vinyl. The quality is incredible for an LP....more info
  • This Album Was Used in a Study at Harvard
    The Harvard Department of Psychology in collaboration with the Indiana University School of Education performed a study to investigate the possible relationship between measured intelligence and music appreciation. Thirty full length albums were selected that ranged from Rogers and Hammerstein to Malawian tribal healing music. Just to name a few the spectrum included representatives from the genres of country, jazz, classical, hip hop, R&B, and Heavy Metal. Of the thirty albums selected somehow Person Pitch made the list. 5000 participants from a wide range of socio-economic, ethnic, and educational backgrounds were selected at random. Male/female and age groups were equally represented. The findings concluded that there is a strong relationship (r=+.94) between measured intelligence and appreciation of specific types of musical stimulation. Though genre proved to be statistically irrelevant, individual tracks and albums were observed to have a strong correlation with various intelligence levels. Individuals grouped in intelligence levels in the upper middle-tier and above were found to have a statistically significant affinity for Person Pitch. ...more info
  • Try
    Thank heavens for Noah Lennox. His follow-up to the excellent Young Prayer LP is its complete inverse: maximal where the prior was minimal, cheerful instead of mournful, more influenced by dub and electronica than folk. And yet both albums are great.

    Person Pitch begins with "Comfy in Nautica", which both defines the album's sound and provides an accessible jumping-off point, like any good opener should. To get an idea of what the sound is like this time around, picture Brian Wilson singing in the middle of a car factory somewhere in the middle of Africa, with drums and noises from outside sometimes working their way into the mix, and the occasional guest appearance by some thick, dubby basslines.

    "Comfy in Nautica" itself is pretty simple; some clattering industrial percussion, a towering looped vocal sample and Lennox's heavily reverbed vocals. These same elements show up repeatedly elsewhere on the album, but thankfully there's much more to it than just that. Take, for instance, the ferocious tabla opener to "Good Girl/Carrots", the second of two twelve-minute epics on the album, and one of my favorite tracks. This is followed by a loping, easy section. The lyrics here seem to reference Mitch Hedburg, before breaking off into a gentle debate with a music snob who's attempting to put Lennox down. Then the track drifts underwater, accompanied by chimes and heavy bass as Panda exhorts us to "Take a risk just for yourselves/and wade into the deepest of the oceans". The track ends on an exultant note, the shimmering chimes drawing it to its close.

    In fact, I'm pretty sure Person Pitch is worth buying for "Carrots" alone. But other tracks like the whirling, giddy guitar jam of "Bros" and the smooth echoes of "I'm Not" are equally elating. It's easily the happiest album released this year, and probably the most conventionally listenable thing any member of Animal Collective has ever created....more info
  • Magic Mushroom Music
    Like another reviewer on here, I was not all that impressed with Panda Bear's first solo record, Young Prayer. It was overly simple and lo-fi. There's not much that I can say about it that hasn't been said before. However, with Person Pitch, Panda Bear has created an amazing audio tapestry of hazy samples and sun-drenched guitarscapes. If I had to reduce this review to as few words as possible, I would say this: Fennesz's Endless Summer meets the Beach Boys' Pet Sounds in Animal Collective's basement. I hesitate to mention AC here but this album is definitely reminiscent of the more melodic parts of Feels. I'm going to go out on a limb and say that this is more accessible on the first listen than any AC release.

    There are only 7 tracks here, but there is no filler on the album and two of the tracks exceed the 10-minute mark. It opens with Comfy In Nautica - a repeated choral loop on top of simple 1-2-3-4 factory-noise percussion that floats underneath Noah's (Panda's real name) nostalgic singing. The next track, Take Pills, reminds me of Banshee Beat from Feels in that it begins slow and lurching but becomes upbeat about 3 minutes into it. "I don't want for us to take pills anymore..." is the catchy refrain to this one. Next comes Bros, the album's centerpiece. It starts with the sound of an owl hooting, but jumps into the melody very quickly. It desolves into lovely, hazy AC territory about halfway through, and the owl comes back for some background vocal work.

    There are four other tracks that come next. I'm not going to try to go through each of them here, mostly because I fear my adjectives will become redundant. But if you enjoy the first three tracks, you're most likely going to enjoy the last four. Every track on here has a similar sound and feel to it, but they each stand out on their own. I highly recommend this to fans of AC, who most likely do not need my recommendation, but also to people who feel like AC is maybe a bit too out there for them at times....more info
  • Love at first listen
    first off i don't really get the constant brian wilson comparisons. i know his voice is similar, and i hear that there are even beach boys samples on here. but i'm not really hearing the harmonies he's famous for. i love this record. animal collective can be really frustrating at times. some of their music sounds like a persistent one note hum spread out over like 5 songs. but 'person pitch' is everything that's great about animal collective, plus. if there's one complaint, it's that he repeats one line over and over a lot. but that's what he (and animal collective) does, makes you wait. in the end you get a helluva payoff. this has been in the cd player constantly since the first time i heard it. good girl/carrots is 3, 3, 3 songs in one and is the standout. bro's isn't far behind. there's such moments of seemingly effortless brilliance. it clicks with me in a big, big, way. ...more info
  • Total GARBAGE
    AND I DON'T MEAN THE GROUP GARBAGE! If you want a detailed review, go somewhere else. I heard one song on this CD, "Take Pills", on internet radio. I liked it enough to take a chance on the entire CD hoping the other tracks would be as good, or nearly as good as "Take Pills". So, I got my delivery from Amazon at work and popped it in my computer for a listen. EVERY SONG BUT "TAKE PILLS" WERE GARBAGE. I learned an expensive lesson I should have learned long ago: Never buy a CD based on ONE song. Garbage like this is why people download music illegally. $13 bucks down the drain!...more info
  • honesty
    The hype for Person Pitch is ablaze and acclaim for Panda Bear's follow up to the underrated Young Prayer now carries more words than most modern novels. Regardless, it is up to you to defend yourself from being won over by the majority and make sure your opinion of Person Pitch is yours. You know, you don't have to love everything any Animal Collective member produces. Panda Bear's third album sees him trading in the eternal acoustic strumming of previous albums to the knobs of a mixer. Spanning seven tracks of various length Person Pitch is one of the most deservedly (however overplayed the comparison is) labeled Brian-Wilson-influenced album to come out of the Paw Tracks camp. Using the genuinely beautiful harmonies that defined his influences along with slowly evolving repetitious samples Panda Bear has molded seven extended pop songs. The effortless nature and drowsy comfort these songs embody somehow maintain an attention span but not too much more. There is nothing overtly groundbreaking here nor is there a particularly evocative melody climactic experience; just pleasantness. So, while enjoyable and recommended, for the over-hyped explorer: don't expect the mind-blowing power Sung Tongs. ...more info
  • Magical Realism
    The warmest record i've ever heard (besides Aphex Twin's Selected Ambient Works vol. II). You can feel the goodness in the vibrations, it melts your soul down to a primordial goo - it's electric.

    It takes a lot of love and patience to make a record this magnificent from mostly samples and vocal effects. You get visions of Panda Bear sitting in his bedroom with a 4-track or a laptop with the windows wide open, facing the ocean, watching Portugal by daylight, by moonlight, by the very fabric which helped inspire most of this albums sound and emotional content.

    Person Pitch, as a way of life, makes you forget and remember. This is an album that defies the current music trend, it creates it's own path all the while helping all listeners along without hesitation.

    I would recommend using headphones and buying the vinyl for the full effect....more info
  • all of these reviews are wrong
    Im sorry I dont mean to come off as an elitist or anything but its true. First off the first panda bear album is very great actually. I love the songs on it so much it is a very mood driven meditative work a lot like this. Im sorry that there are people that think that because he recorded it in his bed room that makes it any less amazing than studio albums. Secondly this album lacks any indie pretensions that the other terrible review claims. It is so great I havent been able to stop playing it. The 12 minute peices do not drag on a bit Panda bear lists can and neu in his liner notes (among the huge lists of other influential artists) and he definately took fine notes on how to get his repitition on. Some moments are very dub influnced (liner notes also acknowledge king tubby and lee "scratch" perry) I do not think it is a beach boys rip off. It sounds very familiar to a beach boys sound but it is no carbon copy it is definately in its own arena. I dont understand why all these kids need to get on here and hate if you dont like it explain yourself better while writing a review. If you think your oppinion matters justify it. Its a great album the only thing I imagine rivaling it this year is Animal Collectives much anticipated release which panda bear is a member of. ...more info
  • utterly original
    I really like Animal Collective (when they're not confounding the hell out of me) but had no idea at all bold and sweet and wild Panda Bear's second solo disc would be until a good friend told me I had to give a listen. A great, great surprise, this has been a perfect album to crank while alone in the house and feeling exponential. If you can't hear it I'm sorry, it's been a gift for me......more info
  • Panda Bear = Beach Boys + Adrian Sherwood + Polmo Polpo

    These days, indie rock shelves swell and collapse under the weight of bedroom projects, a large portion of those being something from an attention starved bassist or drummer from xx band. Many of these sound like afterthoughts, something a songwriter has kicking around after the band wraps up an album. That is not the case here. Noah Lennox's Panda Bear work seems more of an extension of his activities with Animal Collective, not just absent noodlings to occupy his time. Track after track, Lennox melds terrifically catchy vocals with heavenly bizarre, ethereal abstract dub, at once delivering the greatest pop and post-post-rock (sic) record in ages. Affecting an accent and same range as Brian Wilson, Lennox douses his lush croon/harmonies in cathedral style reverb while working a kitchen-sink of marching rhythms and kamikaze dive-bombs ("Comfy in Nautica"), found percussion and island guitar strums ("Take Pills"), tabla loops and bit-shifted trumpets ("Good Girl") and pulse-driven piano lullabies ("Ponytail"). Stunning, bizarre, hooky, hokie and intoxicating, after a few listens you might consider taking up a petition to keep Lennox away from his day job....more info
  • vinyl opinion
    I have the LP edition, double vinyl. of course I love the album, I used to hear it on Cd, since I love vinyl format I bought this, It is ok, but not a big deal actually. THe sound is kind of the same than cd, not incredible, it's normal, like cd, that was I bit disapointing for me. GReat album, but vinyl format in this case is not a difference...more info
  • perfect pitch
    the whole thing (and in particular 'bros') sounds like it was made by some happy 8 year olds high on acid and kool aid....its totally insanely brilliant....more info
  • One of the best albums of the 2000s thus far
    After thoroughly listening through Person Pitch, Noah Lennox's third solo album, several times, three things ultimately struck me most.

    The first was how quickly this album seemed to pass by. On the first listen, I passively lent it my ears while doing other busy work. I knew I liked what I heard, but it seemed to have ended after fifteen minutes. After looking through the tracklist, I realized that over forty five minutes had passed in actuality. And on many listens since then, I have also felt similarly, even though I have been paying very close attention to the music, that it seems like it must go by in under a half hour.

    I can attribute this strange phenomenon to a number of factors, the first of which is Panda Bear's wide use of sampling and repetition throughout the album. When I saw Animal Collective live at Pitchfork, I found it quite interesting that the show was really just shy of a laptop show; all three members of the band were at one point in front of a soundboard, the Geologist actually for the entire show. Avey Tare was actually quite versatile, sometimes on a guitar or drums. Panda Bear spent most of the show in front of his soundboard, but picked up on percussion a couple times.

    What is interesting about Panda Bear's behavior as an electronic artist, and I firmly believe he can be considered some type of electronic artist now, is that he actually doesn't sample more than a little bit throughout the album. But when he does, he combines his sample choices with concocted or found sounds, and he never lets the album be completely electronic or completely organic. He builds up layers of sound much like Animal Collective did on Strawberry Jam, although somewhat less violent here, and then places them carefully over his rhythms. Many of his loops end in dissonant or floaty chords, thus making them that much more versatile and fluid. What many of them reminded me of before anything else was the album Pygmalion by Slowdive, and its accompanying demo sessions. It is only marginally likely that Panda Bear was ever actually influenced by this album, but judging by his use of these floaty vocal loops and many of the subtle melodies buried beneath the surfaces of many songs, it sure wouldn't surprise me. In any case, all of these elements come together to make a rhythmic result that begs for the listener to do two things at once, relax and listen. In this sense, time is not a concern. Panda Bear does what he needs to do, and lets the songs end on their own. Sometimes it takes twelve minutes, and sometimes four. Perhaps the juxtaposition of long songs next to shorter songs has something to do with my loss of sense of time while listening to this album.

    The second thing that surprised me was how accurately the album cover depicts the sound of the album. I can think of several other albums that have done such just as effectively, but none of those other album covers were quite as complex as the one for Person Pitch, making it that much more impressive.

    The meat of the album are the layers of sound built in each song. Sounds are built upon each other, sometimes used for one time, several bars, or the rest of the song. The samples and effects come from all different directions, parts of life. Some may sound like the sound of water in a bubble bath, while others may sound like animals, the clattering of chains, the sound that Pop Rocks make in your mouth, fireworks going off, doorbells, and whatever else Panda Bear has found or created. The effects, however, are treated with so much watery reverberation that deciphering them becomes difficult. I can liken this to the experience of seeing Animal Collective live, and not really being able to tell what was going on in the music simply because it was so thick, loud, and confusing. This may have been somewhat of a flaw live, but it sure made the music sound that much more awe inspiring, and on record it isn't a problem. However, I do find myself unable to pick out what I am hearing much of the time while listening to this album. It begs to be turned up, because you can never really hear exactly what is happening. After you turn it up, you still can't really make sense of things, but this is an album that grows in power exponentially with volume simply because for every notch on your knob you turn, you are that much more submerged in the music and what is going on.

    Lastly, I have been simply amazed at how happy it makes me to listen to the album.

    People seem to have forgotten to harmonize their voices with one another. They are getting better with it lately (See Fleet Foxes pretty swell release this year that has been lapped up by the hipster crowd this year, with very good vocal harmonies. Actually, they played on the same stage as Animal Collective at Pitchfork.), but still, people forget that vocal harmonies sell. Panda Bear isn't the freaking Mamas and Papas, but he harmonizes with himself in lovely ways that we don't hear often enough. And his smooth, playful vocals are really what make this album the pop gem it is.

    Lyrically, Panda Bear has the guts to sing about things that actually matter. And at that, values that his audience might actually need to hear. And the main theme of the album is so basic, so fundamental that most everyone, including myself, have glazed over it in our minds a long time ago. Be yourself. Don't let anyone else tell you what is cool, what you should listen to, or make you feel inferior. Good Girl/Carrots seems to be the most prevalent in this philosophy. After the whimsical and fun run of "Good Girl," the next movement "Carrots," after a heartwarming reference to Mitch Hedberg, rouses a widespread defense against the kind of people who try to tell you what to listen to, to make you cling to a scene. The kinds of people that try to make themselves feel superior by collecting "all those first editions." Possibly the most affecting line is an indirect put down against "those mags and websites who try to shape your style," like perhaps Pitchforkmedia.com, or better yet, this website right here. The best and most representative line, however, is sandwiched in the middle of this song; "All I need to know, I knew so early." These are the kind of lyrics that we heard when we were small children on TV. Why doesn't anyone sing about these issues anymore?

    But what really makes this album special is that it doesn't falter even once. All of these elements come together to make a collection of seven lovely, moving songs that keep their momentum. The opening Comfy In Nautica sounds like a glorious call over a cliff to some canyon. Then, Take Pills' two separate movements end up being as wonderful as one another, the first a slow relaxing piece, and then a marching, so-catchy-it-should-be-illegal second piece. And then of course comes the main song on the album, the sprawling Bros, for which my praise cannot be effectively articulated into written word. The almost tropical sounding aural cascades of I'm Not act as the keystone of the album. Good Girl/Carrots comes after it, and is just as moving as Bros. In the final stretch of the album, we have possibly the two most digestible and overall lovely pieces on the album, the ambient sound collage Search For Delicious, and a tiny, quite moving lullaby type song, Ponytail, which addresses the difficulties and wonders associated with change.

    I think this is the one album of 2007 that I feel I can be unnecessarily enthusiastic about. It really is that good. Saying it is important or groundbreaking might be a little premature. But what seems to be the trend in pop music lately is either going toward the extremes of wildly experimental or almost ridiculously palatable. Sometimes we get people hitting pots and pans in complex polyrhythms, and sometimes we get The Jonas Brothers. Pop music has become a hedgemaze, and people seem to think that they need to base their decisions on which way to go according to how much is going to sell. Panda Bear, it seems, doesn't really care. He was just taking a walk, and he stumbled upon the beautiful garden in the center. If any album could introduce free form and experimentalism into the world of glorious catchy pop music, Person Pitch is that album....more info
  • Great in critical sense, but clash in personal preference
    Person Pitch is the first solo effort by Animal Collective member Panda Bear. While containing many interesting conepts and fresh ideas, I could never find myself truly enjoying the album. After several re-listenings my confusion only grew; I felt left out of the circle. I don't discourage you from buying this album, I just caution you to borrow it from a friend first. If you are like myself, it might not be the experience you had conjured in your mind. Save some cash, give it a listen, and if you love it by all means buy it. ...more info
  • almost spiritual.......
    An album of this standing, if ever, rarely comes along. Animal Collective's Noah Lennox furthers his alter role as Panda Bear and boy are we ever glad he did. Call it experimental, far-outlandish or even psychedelic if you will. The sheer truth is that "Person Pitch" is genius. Intoxicating and optimistic, it's almost spiritual! Maybe Portugal had some something to do with (Noah now resides in Libson, Portugal with his wife and daughter) who knows? What we do know is that the album is full of subtle surprises that reveal themselves with every listen; typical of Animal Collective, I know. But "Person Pitch" is truly in a class of it's own. Simply put, this is one of the most beautiful, personal, special, good-spirited, healthy, invigorating, enchanting, exhilarating, carefully crafted albums of all time.

    ...more info

 

 
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